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We use "on the side (of X)" to mean "on one of the sides of X". It's used with things that can be clearly divided into sides, like a political debate, a border, or the sides of a house. In this case, "on one side ... and on the other side" would mean the wreckage has precisely two sides, one with a grave, and the other with an ...


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Both are correct, and they have different meanings. "He won't be back for six months" means that he won't be back during the next six months. If he will be back at the end of the six months, you could say "he will be back in six months"; this does not contradict the earlier statement. "He won't be back in six months" means that ...


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It could mean that "I" was in the cave with the ball, or it could mean that "the ball" was in the cave (for example if you shot the ball with gun, the ball might be in the cave, but you are not). Or it could mean that the ball was propelled into the cave by the hit, but this meaning would be better expressed by "into the cave". ...


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There's no rule here about "ending sentences with is/are". There is a rule about moving interrogative pronouns (wh-questions) to the front of a sentence, and sometimes that leaves the verb ("is/are" in your examples) at the end of the sentence. In your examples, the difference is in the structures of the two noun clauses after "Do ...


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Here, the phrase "in a coat" is an adverbial phrase of manner, which means it acts like an adverb that answers the question "how" about "dressed". So yes, it does modify "dressed". However, "dressed" here is not a verb, but an adjective modifying the subject "I". In English, "to be dressed"...


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