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I'm on the road and will be in the area tomorrow and clean and discreet I can get a ride anywhere near me and I can get you the info you need for the next door to the store and get some rest and feel better soon as possible so I can see what I can do for you guys and clean the kitchen table and chairs and the electric bill is about to be on the way soon as ...


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Tom is playing God of War [at Tim's house]. The underlined bracketed expression belongs to the class preposition phrase, and its function is adjunct. Be careful, though, when using the term 'adverbial phrase'. It is potentially misleading since it is quite often used for any phrase functioning as adverbial and hence likely to be confused with adverb phrase ...


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Yes, the prepositional phrases can act as an adjective phrase or as an adverbial phrase. The girl with a smiling face is my sister. Here, the phrase "with a smiling face" is a prepositional phrase in form and an adjective phrase in function. Tom is playing God of War at Tim's house. In your example, the phrase "at Tim's house" is a prepositional ...


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The use of prepositions is not determined by general rules. It is a mess of special cases. But the rules about determiners do follow general rules. Nouns that are proper names do not take determiners. Nouns that are mass nouns do not take determiners. Nouns that are countable nouns, are in the singular, and are not being used as proper names do require ...


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Of those sentances the one with "in" looks the most idomatic to me. However. 640p refers to the pixel count width wise. Umm no. When talking about video the number before the p or i (BTW p is short for progressive not for pixels) refers to the vertical resolution, not horizontal. 640p is not a common/standard resolution. The normal values are. 240p: ...


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When colour photography first became possible, we would describe a film as being in colour... and old films were in black and white. I think that the image resolution is a similar property, so one could say in 640 p. You could also simply say that the picture is 640 p.


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Meaning of both sentences are same But, first one is not commonly used second one is better


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Try to understand these two sentences: What's that on the water? There's something floating in the water. So, you cannot say that one sentence is good and other one is wrong. Because usage of prepositions depends on context of the sentences.


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"Resource" can take a complement with "for", specifying the purpose or target of the resource. So A resource for the medical field means a resource applied to the medical field, which doesn't make a lot of sense, and would probably be interpreted as A resource for certain unspecified activities in the medical field. "Resource" does not take a complement ...


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How to know that 'to' is infinitive particle or preposition? In an infinitive, the X in to X will be a verb. If it's a preposition, X will be a noun. Nouns often have articles or other determiners in front of them, if one of these exists for X, to then has to be a preposition. I walked to the park - the is an article and that only appears in front of ...


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The verb try can take a "to"-infinitive clause, or a noun clause. It cannot take a prepositional phrase introduced by "to". This means that your 2 and 4 are not grammatical; your 1 and 3 are: try (whether a base form after don't or a gerund after stop) can take the clause to be smart. Note that this is a property of try. " ... to being" is not necessarily ...


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Examples 2 and 4 are not grammatical, and so can't be analyzed. In example 1, "to be" is the to-infinitive; "to" is not a preposition. For example 3, "trying" is a gerund-participle acting as the head of the clause "trying to be smart." That clause is the complement of "stop". The function of "to be" is the same as in example 1.


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Both are grammatical and correct, I would naturally use the first one in general conversation as a native speaker.


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The meaning of important is the same in all of these sentences. The choice of in vs. for is governed by the words that follow. The examples with in use that preposition in the sense of "part of" or "an ingredient of", and the examples with for use it in the sense of "in order to", i.e. to say that something is a prerequisite for another thing. You could ...


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