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1A. Some people value the beliefs in respect. 1B. Some people value respect beliefs Neither of these is correct, adn i am not at all sure what the intended meaning is. It might be: Some people value respecting the beliefs of others. 2A. The president gave him an approval to the policy. 2B. The president gave him a policy approval 2A is ...


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Both are correct, in different contexts. "On" means "atop of", and would be used for things that you sit on the surface of, such as a barstool. "In" means "amongst" or "inside of", and would normally be used for something you sit within, such as a bathtub. Returning to the chair example though, there are different types of chair and it is not uncommon to ...


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There's not really much difference between these sentences -- not when it comes to the information they actually convey, anyway. Today is my birthday, whether I say it happens to be, or just that it is. Which brings us to the question of why a structure like this exists. Well, because language is an imprecise and constantly evolving tool and sometimes we ...


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Essentially, no (they aren't different). The phrase "happens" is used for saying that something is true, although it is surprising that it is true. Source You could similarly say: Coincidentally, it's my birthday today. Although it's worth noting that: Coincidentally, it happens to be my birthday today. Is also valid. Interestingly, the phrase "it ...


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You are asking whether omitting a preposition from a phrasal verb makes any difference. Well, if you go by the definition, it mentions - a phrase that consists of a verb with a preposition or adverb or both, the meaning of which is different from the meaning of its separate parts While in most of the cases, it's true, in some cases, as in here, it makes ...


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As a native American English speaker, both versions are roughly interchangeable. However, "being + [verb]" implies to me a stronger focus on the action behind something, while words that end in "-ed" imply more of an adjective. For 1/2, I would prefer 1 as it focuses on the action of informing families, instead of the fact that families are informed. For ...


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Yes, the use of "back at" in these sentences is natural and grammatically correct. In these sentences, "Back" indicates that the scene is in the past. This is redundant, because the sentences' verbs also use the past tense. In formal writing, similar sentences usually start with "At" instead of "Back at". In these sentences, "at" is appropriate because a ...


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The meanings of "in" and "from" in this context are very similar. Using "from" is a typical meaning of "from". You can consider "coming in the opposite direction" to be an idiom. You can't generalise it to say "a car coming in London" (but "from London" would be fine). You can say "in the direction of London". And this can be used with "going" to ...


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