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"since late on the previous evening"

It doesn't sound wrong to me [dialect: U.S. English]. To compare a simpler sentence: It happened on Saturday evening. is quite natural. Note that it is not *It happened in Saturday evening. though ...
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0 votes

Should prepositions be repeated while joining multiple prepositional phrases?

Grammatically they are both fine. The second one is longer to write, but is a little easier to read and understand. One could even repeat the "to": "and from C to A and to B".
2 votes
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Adverb phrase vs adjective phrase …

In your sentence, the phrase "in the shop" only modifies "buy", not "bandages". But let's change the sentence a bit: Take this money and buy the bandages in the shop. ...
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2 votes
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How to know which words are being modified by a prepositional phrase?

It describes the table. This is because you don't carve the legs of girls. This kind of reasoning is called "pragmatics". You understand which noun phrase is modified partly by syntax (the ...
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0 votes
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Make comparison "For ” some indicators

You should use "for indicators": I did something for something "in indicators" isn't really idiomatic especially when you aren't specifically doing something in something else.
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1 vote

"very well above", "so well above", "so much above"

I would not use any of your suggestions in the context in which you are proposing. "Well above" is something native speakers say when talking about gradations - for example, "his ...
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0 votes

"very well above", "so well above", "so much above"

In informal speech, I would most often use way: The helicopter is way above us. The bridge is way up high. Our car is way on the other side of the parking lot. It might be more of an American ...
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0 votes

As what does phrase "to make me laugh" function in this example? (as an adjective or an adverb)

The person in the video is correct. The example speaker isn't "looking laughingly", they are are looking for a specific kind of book. "a book to make me laugh". If it were an ...
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0 votes

Is the correct preposition used in: "Evaluating Xtool at/in Y"?

You might try something like: How good is Xtool for analysing data? Can Xtool perform specific action? Specific action: can Xtool do it? I use Xtool for action, and it's great! I'd prefer "to ...
  • 669
0 votes

Is the correct preposition used in: "Evaluating Xtool at/in Y"?

I'd opt for "Evaluating X at doing Y" because it is a shortened construction of "Evaluating how good/bad X is at doing Y". Alternatively just title the article "How good/bad ...
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1 vote

"The Lakers have been winning in a row"

When using in a row, a quantifier (such as a number, or a statement) needs to be used. Using you examples: The Lakers have won four times in a row. We need to win many times in a row if we want to ...
2 votes
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What's the difference between "Behind you" and "with you"?

There is, or at least can be, a subtle difference of meaning, but in many situations the two phrases can be interchanged with no real change of meaning. "I am behind you" suggests that the ...
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2 votes

What's the difference between "Behind you" and "with you"?

The two expressions essentially mean the same thing. I am behind you does imply that you are the leader and I am a supporter, but the implication is not strong. Moreover, I am with you does not ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Are the expressions "book about grammar" and "book on grammar" interchangeable?

Your examples that use about and on to describe the grammar book are correct. They both mean the same thing and are interchangeable. A book about grammar. A book on grammar.
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2 votes
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Are there any difference between "of" and "about" in the context?

Please tell me about the new school is a request for a description of the school. It might be a parent asking for information, or someone asking a new pupil how they are experiencing life there. To ...

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