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'Up' is a preposition here. According to Merrian Webster definition 3, 'up' is a preposition used in similar fashion as your examples. For the first example sentence in the question, the applicable definition is 2a - "in a direction regarded as being toward or near the upper end or part of". For the second example sentence in the question, the ...


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This is somewhat a matter of opinion and style. Prepositions can often be used interchangeably in English. "For" is a more direct and unambiguous preposition to use in the example. You use a tool (or a type of indent formatting) for something -- for this type of code to be formatted correctly. You may also use a tool "with" something, ...


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"for a longer time" is correct; "in a longer time" is not. The reason is because what you are describing is the duration of the travel to the workplace. "For _____" is generally how durations of time are described. For example: "I traveled for an hour to work." or "The United States has been a country for ...


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Here's an example sentence from the Scholastic website: "At about the age of 7, children enter what Piaget termed the concrete operational period, which lasts until they are about 12 years old. " https://www.scholastic.com/parents/family-life/creativity-and-critical-thinking/development-milestones/cognitive-development-6-7-year-olds.html


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Your preposition is used correctly, in my view, although a bit weird. I didn't understand what you were saying without the explanation so it might be useful to expand your statement a little to make it clearer. "Live by" is used more often with a large guiding principle, such as "faith" or "virtue", rather than "rumors"...


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