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In English, it's not incorrect to have two consecutive repeated words in a sentence, and one place you'll encounter that is a phrasal verb followed by a preposition. For example: Nevertheless, other shows went on on the fatal day. (H.L. Mencken, On Politics) They scuttled the vessel off the harbour's mouth, and came in in the boat. (J.L. ...


3

No, your second sentence is not idiomatic, as it means you are saying "addicted with" which (as you know) is not the normal collocation. If you need two different prepositions, then you have to apply the proper preposition to each. Example: In order to find the treasure, you must gather up and bind together all of the parts of the map which I have ...


3

The correct answer is expression_3. This is a visualization of a procedure or the results of a procedure. This is a visualization of k-means clustering, applied to our dataset. If you say "visualization for," then you are indicating a destination or purpose of the vizualization, not what it is. This is a visualization for my boss. He likes pretty ...


2

To “live with something” means to “accept something” or to “abide something”. live with something (ACCEPT) to experience and accept an unpleasant event, decision, or situation: When you get arthritis at your age, it’s just something you just have to live with. —Cambridge Dictionary The words every day can be deleted without changing the meaning ...


2

I bought two discounted Standard Airlines tickets to Honolulu...


2

To my ear, that is ungrammatical, a mistake for "it was less a thought than a feeling". Probably a blend with the different structure "It was less of a thought than I expected".


1

He does not leave his house until 9 o'clock. This strongly implies that he does leave his house, and that he does so at "exactly" 9 o'clock (a reasonable amount of imprecision is allowed of course). He does not leave his house before 9 o'clock. This only weakly suggests that he does in fact leave his house. He may or may not. More importantly, it only ...


1

"Renovations on your backyard" mean that the backyard will be improved. "Renovations in your backyard means that is the location of the renovation. While that usually means the backyard is being renovated, it is conceivable that the renovations are being done to something nearby, such as a tool shed, the rear of the house, or a fence along a neighbour's ...


1

through is not correct here, in that the meaning is different from by. See definition 8b in Merriam-Webster: 8b : on behalf of // did right by his children "I shall do my duty by him" is kind of like "I have an obligation to him, so I will do what I can to honor it." through doesn't work because in this context it would mean something more ...


1

One and two you cannot remove it but for three and four you can. This is because the word "being" before another word means that the word (in #1 this word would be "poor") describes the person ("he" in #1). You can reword it to have the same meaning in these examples: Number 1 means: he is poor but he is also happy. Number 2 means: he is fast but he is ...


1

"come over" means "cover". While "over" is usually used with verbs of movement, "above" is more frequently used with verbs of state. Notice you've said: Dark clouds have come over the city (and now are above the city).


1

On is not here a preposition, but an adverb, acting as an intensifier of "far". There is a metaphor of "journeying" into the night, so "far on" means "a long way" (on the metaphorical journey into the night).


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If you understand obvious of and oblivious to, then you can consider the sentence to be an elided form of one of those: Oblivious [to the fact] that an unconscious patient was still lying alone on a bed . . . The sentence would mean essentially the same thing without still, but it's being used to emphasize the fact that the man continued to lie on the ...


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I think it works either way. When writing, I would prefer using "of" for clarity, but I might say it without the "of". "not that nice a hotel", "not that great a cook", "not that good a hockey player" are some other examples I found on google.


1

For. X for Y is used to express that you use X to accomplish, complete, allow, or do Y. E.g. I bought tickets for the concert On sounds like you are trying to say you bought the tickets while on a plane.


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