2

I don't know what sort of "participation" is he talking about here? It's a category you are graded on. You may receive a score for attendance, midterms, finals, homework, class participation, etc. Is it class participation of a student? Yes And what should be the preposition before it? In or on? In that precise sentence, "on". He meant "marks ...


2

Yes, the change of tense suggests whether the position is temporary or permanent. This choice of preposition suggests whether you are "in" (either physically or figuratively) the bank/school. So a freelance programmer "is working for a bank" this month, but a teacher "works in a school". The programmer could "be working for a school" next month, designing ...


1

Answered in the comments: "You would not say concerned of either. It's concerned about and anxious about. Using of with either word is unidiomatic at best and ungrammatical at worst. If you insist on the specific phrase anxious of, then the answer here will be that it's wrong. You can change the word that comes before the preposition (such that of becomes ...


1

They're only really similar in specific contexts. For example, all the gold medals different countries have won at the Olympic Games. You can say "the table shows the medals per country", meaning that it shows how many medals each country has won. You can say "the table shows the medals by country", meaning that it shows a bunch of medals, that information ...


1

A is the correct sentence. The grammar of sentence B may be correct but it is unnatural usage. I don't know of any specific rules to help with prepositions, because English doesn't have consistent rules for everything. Learning the correct use of prepositions comes from listening and practice. If anybody else can find a rule that has few exceptions, let us ...


1

In the given context It was Tuesday is more suitable. As you are beginning the story and nothing has been introduced it is correct, the second would be more appropriate where something has been introduced. For example: I really liked that party we went to! It was on Thursday.


1

Neither is idiomatic, nor grammatical "Its one wheel was made in Germany" implies "It has one wheel", and "This wheel was made in Germany". The subject is singular, so you can't use the plural verb "are". The making of the wheel is in the past, so I've used a past tense verb. "One wheel of it was made in German" Is closer to what you probably mean. Again ...


1

You can use ask for in the examples that you have given—you just don't have to. "Can I ask you for a favour?" "I'd like to ask for your advice/opinion on a financial matter." "You have to ask for permission to leave." Technically, I suppose that, in the first two cases, you would use ask for if you were intending to obtain the advice or favour in the ...


1

The form "ask something of someone" can be used for either inquiries and requests. I need to ask for the support of the team. (I want the team to do something. This may be a request for a favor, or a politely phrased order if it comes from a boss.) I am asking careful attention of you. (This is probably a polite order.) She was asking more of me ...


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