3

I fully agree with Lambie and Astralbee. Which preposition do I use after the verb “negotiate”? That depends on the context, I will explain. Do I have to use the preposition about or for after negotiate? For example: . . . No, you don't have to use those two all the time. For your example sentence We will negotiate with the company about/for a ...


3

negotiate takes direct objects: We will negotiate with the company about/for a better deal. should be: We will negotiate a better deal with the company. That is the most idiomatic. Any dictionary will tell you that so I am not bothering to cite one. It is possible to say: for a better deal but in written form that is not the best choice.


3

It is not idiomatic say "negotiate for/about" just as it would be incorrect to say "discuss for..." You can discuss a topic with someone. You can negotiate a deal with someone. Your sentence should be: We will negotiate a better deal with the company.


1

Both are correct. In English certain nouns and standard noun phrases that refer to a specific time can function as adverbs without needing to be introduced by a preposition. They indicate when the action or state named by the verb occurred. With some of these phrases, a preposition is not even allowed. These constructions are all fine even in formal English. ...


1

Prior means 'before'. If something happened prior to the 1980s, it happened before that decade. prior to sth before a particular time or event: the weeks prior to her death Prior (Cambridge Dictionary)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible