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13

"By" gives method (travel by train), it can also be used to give location (by the statue) "at" and "on" give location or time. (let's meet at 5:00, on Oxford street) You want to give purpose, and the preposition that gives purpose is "for" Let's meet for coffee. (Drinking) coffee is the purpose of our meeting


2

There's nothing wrong with "they are by the hill", although it's a little strange when talking about people. It's fine with something larger, for example: The hospital is located by the small hill on the east side of town. People are usually on a hill, otherwise you might say something like: They are on the ground near the hill or various other ...


2

"They aren't by the lake, they are by the hill." ✅ That is a correct English sentence. (notice the placement of the comma) I don't know what the teacher is complaining about. Maybe the sentence refers to a story in which there is a lake and a pond?


2

It is an adverb. From Merriam-Webster's definition of on: adverb 2 b : in continuance or succession // rambled on // and so on In the sentence in question: on they flew → they flew on The adverb is then followed by the prepositional phrase through the gathering darkness.


1

While the sentence has issues in terms of seeming like natural, well-formed text - and possibly with being grammatical in terms of normal usage - the use of to rather than for there isn't one of them. True, there are people who insist that the preposition to should only be used for adverbials that modify translate if they are indicating the language that ...


1

The usual meaning of "take out" here is romantic meeting, usually but not always with the implication that the invitee doesn't pay. "Go out" is ambiguous about who pays. (These details vary enormously depending on local customs.) I've never heard "meal" used like this in the UK except in Macdonald's or similar ("Enjoy your meal"), in the US it's more ...


1

Both can be correct, but there is a difference in meaning between them. The term "over the period" explicitly distributes the event across the time, while "in the period" allows the event to happen all at once. Over a period of 10 years, the gambler lost a hundred thousand dollars. In this sentence the loss will happen throughout the time frame. ...


1

"Get {something} across to {somebody}" means "Present {something} in a way that {somebody} can understand", or "Explain in a way that {somebody} shows they understand". The phrasing assumes that the problem is a difference in language or assumptions. For example, science teachers often have a hard time getting quantum mechanics concepts across to their ...


1

Neither answer is correct. As Kshitij Singh said, "expect something" is the correct form in this case, so you would simply say "We are expecting positive changes in future." "Expecting to" would be used when you are talking about what you expect yourself (or in this case, "we") to do, and would be connected to a verb to create the infinitive form ("to do", ...


1

According to OALD expect something is correct. We are expecting positive changes in future. Expect somebody/something to do something We expect you to arrive by 8 o'clock


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