New answers tagged

1

For me, simply indicating a measurement of duration would have to use "for", not "during". So I was an intern at Company X for four months. is correct. That changes with a more substantive event as the object of the preposition: I was an intern during four months of intense growth within the company. (I am an American English speaker. ...


2

A café is a store which you can go inside of. It is also a landmark which you can recognize and use as a reference point without going inside. Each of the prepositions you use would be acceptable grammatically, but there are different meanings: "We wait in the café" means we go inside the café and wait. It is likely, but not guaranteed, that we ...


0

"In my experience" and "in your experience" are very very common phrases, almost fixed phrases. So much so that the standard online initialism "IME" stands for "In my experience". "From your experience" is reasonably common, although far less common than forms using "in". It is often used when ...


0

I was an intern at Company X for four months. is much more commonly used than the variant with "during" and in my view sounds more natural, at least in AmE. The use of "during" ias not wrong here but is sufficiently unusual for a listener to raise an eyebrow at it, I think. I was an intern at Company X during 2006. probably means that ...


1

You lie in your bed, so you need to slip out of it. When you would've been lying on your couch, you could slip off of it. So you use 'slip out of' when you're in something, and 'slip off of' when you're on something.


0

It might seem complicated, but the answer is manageable. Use “to” when the reason or purpose is a verb. Use “for” when the reason or purpose is a noun.


0

He tore the paper into four pieces. Into sounds more natural. It's neither idiomatic nor equally correct since in is used for indicating things inside of "something." While into refers to places something physically inside something else just like in, it can also be used for several different other things such as movement, direction, location, etc....


2

Before you tear it, it's in one piece. You tear it into pieces. When you've finished, it is in four pieces.


0

In terms of grammar, it can be analyzed several ways. Here's the first three I found: "I am sitting in the car and I am sitting across the street." "I am sitting in the car which is across the street." "I am sitting in the car and I am across the street." where "across the street" modifies the subject "I" ...


2

No, those uses would not be ideal (and maybe the speakers you mention aren't really using "integrate" properly). In this definition, the words "into" and "with" show up. I can think of three constructions: Integrate A into B Integrate A with B Integrate A and B In all cases, "integrate" is a good choice when two ...


1

The first example feels a bit convoluted, but is generally correct. The second example is plainly wrong ;) Let's start with the second example: The playlist was played in the songs sung by popular singers. would mean that the playlist was played in the songs, like for example a band is playing in the concert hall. That just doesn't work ;) On the other ...


-1

The playlist was played with the songs sung by the popular singers. This preposition is correct since with is a kind of a word accompanied by another term. While in is usually used for words referring to either things inside something, or a date( for example, 1952 and 2012), movements made, etc. Also, if you read both sentences the 1st example sounds more ...


0

It depends on whether you are using a 3-dimensional (volume) metaphor (in) or a 2-dimensional (surface) metaphor (on). Hard drives, at least the rotating type, use surfaces of platters (albeit to a certain depth) to store magnetic information. Maybe that is where the terminology "on the drive" arose. "In the memory" may be a better fit ...


3

If your head, or some portion of it, is currently located in some space that would otherwise be occupied by the pillow, but for your head displacing it, then your head has gone into the pillow.


9

Good question! It’s not something I consciously think about often, but into and onto are very tricky words: I remember one fellow from Mexico, who had grown up using en for both and finally thought he had it: onto means on top of, into means inside. Then he’s at the airport, and the loudspeaker announces that everyone should get onto the airplane. (I ...


28

Onto portrays the pillow as a surface. Into makes sense if the pillow is fluffy and partially surrounds your head. Assuming an ordinary-sized pillow, "He sank into the pillow" is another way of saying (more literally) "His head sank into the pillow".


14

I'm pretty sure sank is the reason here, it becomes a metaphor in which into is used since "sank" literally proves a rhetorical point. The word into refers to the person slowly sinking "into" the pillow and not actually/literally the head being inside of the pillow. You can say it as in the head sank into the pillow because of its ...


1

In most countries in which English is the (or an) official language, the law has a term 'contempt of court' which is the offence ('offense' in US English) of being disobedient to or disrespectful toward a court of law and its officers in the form of behaviour/behavior that opposes or defies the authority, justice, and dignity of the court. A person ...


0

As the comment by Kate Bunting correctly points out, the most usual way to express the height of the flagpole is to say: The flagpole was ten feet tall. or if the height was changed later or there is some other reason to emphasize the height at the time of production: The flagpole was ten feet tall when it was produced. To try to create a grammatically ...


1

The preposition differences are subtle here. The first group of verbs you have listed are behaviors that exhibit or communicate the sensation the person is feeling. Trembling with fear means that fear is shown by trembling. Dying/fainting from fear is a significant change that the person undergoes, caused by fear. Out of is equivalent to from in this context....


0

"To ponder on / ponder over / ponder upon" means 'to think about'. Therefore, 'ponder about' is NOT used. Nor is the 'ponder upon' very common today. "He seemed to be pondering on / over his answer." In US English, the verb 'ponder' takes a direct object without any preposition : "He seemed to be pondering his answer."


1

Both of the comments are correct. As Kate said, your teacher is flat-out wrong. "Manufactured with a bigger size" is not idiomatic at all. "...with more room inside them" could work, but it just makes the sentence clunkier. And as Fumble said, "in a larger size" is really only used when there are set sizes to select from. If the ...


0

X to Y has a lot of meanings and one of those is a destination or direction identifier - it's used to express the target/direction that X is pointing or facing. X at Y answers the question where is X? and this typically works in English only if Y is a place or a point on some type of line, sequence, or continuum. This concept is usually invalid for a person'...


0

TO is correct. You can get a sense of this from Google n-grams.


0

Both are perfectly good (in my British English), but have a slightly different meaning. What time do you go in at? or What time do you go in? suggests that there is an exact time that you aim to be in. What time do you go in for? suggests that there is a time by which you will normally be in. The distinction is more natural in the answer: I go into work ...


1

Unfortunately theres no real reason why one would be more suitable than the other. It would really depend on the speaker and its fine to use either. Because a playground is a finite area,(fenced in, has a paved ground designated for it), in or on works in both sentences. They are in the playground area and they are on its grounds.


1

Middle East Syrian army steps up offensive on rebel redoubt in southwestern city. Reuters news agency Not at all. On or against can be used with offensive, which, of course, is military or like a military offensive. An attack on or against a person is right. Offensive would not be right unless it was against the person's power, politically or militarily. ...


0

"It gets narrower towards the top" means it goes up straight, then near the top it gets narrower. "It gets narrower as it goes up" means it steadily gets narrower the farther up it goes.


0

In your sentence context, "towards the top" is more commonly used. "upwards" isn't as clear to me as an english speaker, but I don't think that it's technically wrong.


0

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco was translated by a great translator. It is old fashioned on purpose. In modern English, the from Pisa would be move: almost following the line of mountains that leads from Pisa in the direction of the pilgrim's way to Santiago. |in the direction of the pilgrim's way] is one phrase inserted between lead and to. X leads ...


0

This use of "lead" is followed by a direction/path, which could be a variety of prepositional phrases: All roads lead to Rome. All roads lead from Rome. All roads lead in that direction. All roads lead over the hills. etc.


1

There is a special construction where with marks a verbless absolute clause modifying the main clause. To take the example in the previous answer: With so many people ill, the meeting was cancelled. This is equivalent to: Given that so many people were ill, the meeting was cancelled. The sentence from your question: With back-to-back matches against ...


0

Naively, it looks like "in the air" is an adverbial of place because it answers the question "where". In "There's smoke in the air", "in the air" describes the location of the smoke. But when we say that change/love/tension/... is "in the air", the question "where" no longer applies. Merriam-Webster ...


0

"In the air" does not function as an adverb. It does not modify the verb. Instead it functions as the object of the verb, although it is not strictly speaking an object, because it is not a noun phrase. Formally it is a verb complement. "In the air" is a fixed phrase or idiom, meaning generally felt by those in the room, house or area. &...


2

To answer this question, it is important to first explain the difference between prevalence and incidence in medical reporting. Prevalence In a study of prevalent cases of diabetes with a one year time period, anyone who has diabetes during the one year study period would be counted as a case. These prevalent cases would include both people who have ...


0

"The number of cases IS..." or "Cases (or case-numbers) ARE..." You don't need "reach". In/by are as Michael Harvey says.


2

350 in 2030: the number will be 350 at some point in the year 2030 and not before 350 by 2030: the number will be 350 or more at any point in the year 2030 or before You should remove reach.


1

According to "Advanced Grammar in use", "With" can be used followed by a noun phrase to give a reason, consider the following example: With so many people ill, the meeting was cancelled (== as a result of there being)


1

cut on my arm vs. cut in my arm: This is a specific sense of "cut" meaning a long thin skin wound. My sense is that on is the default or zoomed-out view which explains where on my body the cut can be found, and emphasizes that the cut is visible on the surface of the skin. In is the zoomed-in view which focuses on the opening created by slicing ...


1

One factor is whether it goes all the way through. A cut "in" a piece of a paper usually means that the cut goes all the way through and makes a hole in the paper. A cut "on" your arm usually means that there is an indentation on your arm, but it doesn't go all the way through.


0

First, you need an article: normally a book, unless the book has already been mentioned or you expect the hearer to know which book, in which case the book. As for your question: a book is not a method, so you can't use by. You could say I'm studying by reading a book but not by a book. The most common choice would be I'm studying from a book.


0

In the U.S. we do not enroll in majors. We enroll in classes/courses that we need to complete in order to graduate from a college in the subject/field we have majored in. You major in engineering and enroll in engineering classes. After graduation you can say, Engineering was my major. I majored in engineering. If you decide math is hard you can later ...


1

If we set aside the island bit, across suggests the goal is getting to the other side. Through suggests the goal lies within. If the bar is in the middle of the restaurant, you walk through the restaurant to get to the bar. If the bar is off to the side of the restaurant, you walk across the restaurant to get to the bar.


0

to be something to it/that/this. where it refers to whatever came before: I've had two days away, I've gotten a little sleep... and I am finally starting to feel like myself again. I think there's really something to it. it refers to being away two days and getting sleep I ate only salad for dinner all week and feel really great. There's really something ...


0

Both phrases are correct but have different nuances. Via comes to English from Latin, where it means "way" or "road." In English, it means something like "by means of" or "through the channel of." Thus, I just scheduled a meeting via Outlook, means I just scheduled a meeting that will occur by means of Outlook. This ...


1

"Over toward" is a colloquial phrase meaning simply "in the direction of." There is extremely little difference between "toward" and "over toward;" the one thing that "over" adds to the phrase is a vague sense of increased distance, depending on context. Otherwise it is essentially a filler word.


0

Combining a verb with "at" in examples like shoot at something, peck at something, kick at something is called the conative construction. The meaning changes slightly if "at" is omitted. This "at" can indicate repetition or potential lack of completion of an action. Shooting at a bird means aiming at a bird and shooting, but ...


3

Across is two-dimensional -- it refers to a motion over landscape or flat area. Crossing the area is going from one side to the other, which assumes boundaries on the area. Through is three-dimensional -- it refers to a motion that may move in only two dimensions, but which counters obstacles in three dimensions. Contrast walking across the park and through ...


1

The preposition phrase is with one player less. It acts as a modifier of the sentence, telling the conditions we played under. one player less is a noun phrase. It works the same as played with five players played with all our players A noun or a noun phrase can be the object of a preposition. Examples of noun phrases as objects of prepositions: on muddy ...


0

Generally, we say come here and go there when referring to ourselves in the first person. And: I have been working since I graduated to keep up my standard of living. Generally, I have been [action verb] + since + phrase in the simple past. It's best to keep together the action and the point in time it refers to. Purpose is shown by using to. Your purpose is ...


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