New answers tagged

0

In is more appropriate if you are referring to information literally contained within the content of the invitation. On is used more to refer to the address of the invitation. For example, Bidders shall complete, execute and submit their bids in strict compliance with the instructions contained in the invitation for bids her name should appear on the ...


0

I believe that answer B cannot be correct. The mistake seems to be with the interest with. It would be written Interest in I've always had an interest in astronomy. He never seems to show any interest in his children. She takes more of an interest in politics these days He has demonstrated a genuine interest in the project. They take a lively interest in ...


2

In your station example, I’d use the phrase, “away from”. So: He went toward the station He went away from the station. Not sure there’s much more to be said on the matter. 🙂


0

Compare All I want is to mess around. and All I want is ice cream. Both sentences have the form, "All I want is X." Consider that if the speaker were not specifying that X was the only thing she desired, she could have said "I want X." But shifting to the non-unique desire does not change the way that we express X," whether that ...


1

Want has to be followed by a complement. The complement can be a noun or pronoun as an object, or a verb in the to-infinitive form, or an object plus a verb in the to-infinitive form. So All I want is to mess around. is the correct way to make this sentence. The only answer for why we use the to-infinitive and not the bare infinitive is probably "...


0

In English, we call a number, not "call to a number". For example, I call the number on the card that the salesman gave to me. Telemarketers that call a number on the no-call list can be fined There are some other issues with your sentence, though. You need a preposition after "numbers". I would say the numbers are on other cell ...


0

San Pedro is the definition of "here". But I am not sure if adverbs can work like pronouns in this manner. My intuition tells me that they do not. That's okay if you use the right punctuation. A distinct pause is needed before "San Pedro". I want to move here — San Pedro.


1

Actually the real issue with this sentence is "even a better place". You really can't phrase it that way. It has to be "an even better place". Regarding "at" at the end: there's an oft-quoted rule that sentences shouldn't end with prepositions, but really it's one of those rules that needs to be broken quite a lot, especially in ...


0

The reason you can't add "by" to this sentence, grammatically, is that you already have a preposition ("through"), so adding on "by" creates a mix-up — you can't pass by through something. If "by" is what you want, then you should say: "Beautiful indeed is the path by which he passed". You could also say &...


0

The basic sentence I want to move here is fine. If you want to clarify that "here" means "San Pedro", then it would be written I want to move here, San Pedro. Saying I want to move here in San Pedro could mean "I want to move to this specific location within San Pedro" or "I want to move but I want to stay within San Pedro....


1

Contact the team about this issue and Contact the team regarding this issue are both correct and work regardless of whether the issue is a topic or a problem. You can contact the team about workplace rights or cancer, but you can't contact them "with" those things. You can also contact the team about a bug in their software or about a problem you'...


1

None of OP's examples sound idiomatic to me. We don't generally talk about getting / becoming "smart" anyway (you're either smart or you're not, same as you're either tall or not), and we don't usually restrict the scope of adjectival "smart" to a specific subject (being "smart" implies having high general intelligence). To a ...


0

@RonaldSole is correct, the automatic payment is really a property of your account, not your card. That being said, if you are going to be setting these up with/using your debit card, then say “with”/“using”.


0

Your “an x of a y” example does indeed imply that there is more than one “x”, but not necessarily only one “y”, for that we’d say, for example: A wheel of the car. “The x of a y” does indeed imply that a y only has one x. The last example you mentioned is not good English, and is actually from a German website (“.de”).


0

If the windshield is still in one piece (if possibly shattered), and the body lies on top of it, on is the right choice. In could be used if, for instance, the body has fallen hard enough to pierce the windshield and get embedded in it.


2

"At my training" is fine. Training is a noun, and like many nouns for activities (such as the names of sports) it is very flexible and can refer to a single session, a place you go to for the activity, or an activity you attend regularly. For example, "I'm going to football" could mean you are going to the place you regularly go to play ...


3

I am not sure there is an answer to why we use at instead of of that is substantially better than "Because that is the way English is." I am sure your native language also has cases where you use one preposition and not another. But we often use at to mean "caused by" in the case of reactions, or to mean "on the occasion of". ...


-1

Abnormal activity has been registered in/on my phone number, which is why it's suspended. Strangely, both "in" and "on" can work in this sentence, as well as "with". All three prepositions are fine, but for different reasons. "In" works, because the phrase "your phone number" can stand in place of "...


0

"By" likes specifics. When you're dealing with a large area before, you need more wiggle room, you need a more general preposition than "by", so I would use "before": I need you to pull the shipping date any day before 10-Oct, 2021 Important Note: Add "a" or "the" before "shipping date": "I ...


1

In that sentence, "up" is a predicate adjective, with a meaning equivalent to "expired": American Heritage Dictionary up (adjective) 10. Having been finished; over: Your time is up.


0

The first variant feels more correct to me. However, I would suggest another alternative altogether: X published a preview of Y's forthcoming book


0

You could use either option, with a slight distinction in meaning where walking the path is more active than following the path. Depending on your article this might me relevant, if it's an analysis of his philosophy, then following would be more suitable. If it is you reinterpreting his philosophy in a new/current context, I'd use walking.


1

If the firework festival was being held on a barge moored on the river you would say on the river. If it is being held on a piece of land next to the river you would say by the river or beside the river. If you say at the river people would understand you of course but it is not the most common preposition for an event y the river.


1

"by the river" would be apt. "by some place" suggests next to, near or beside a place.So by the river would be a better choice "at the river".Well, I have noticed "at" being used with river in few cases but as per my limited knowledge, "at" is generally used for specific locations or points in space.Since ...


0

It depends what you intend 'ABC' to mean! If you are talking about putting a paper document in its proper place in a file (sorted alphabetically or by date), with ABC means 'in the ABC section of the file'. If ABC is the tax office, with means 'in charge of' - you submit the tax return to them.


1

File (noun) with means that you have entered something as a legal document in charge of ABC. https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=file 2. To enter (a legal document) as an official record. https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=with In the charge or keeping of: left the cat with the neighbors.


1

First, let's look at the sample sentences: Which climate you live in? [Statement: I live in a tropical climate] There is nothing to be scared of. [She is scared of snakes.] I have something to talk about. [She talks about her brother all the time.] I wonder who this book was written by. [The book was written by her friend]. If you have an action verb plus ...


1

Yes, it is correct to use with, although you could say that they looked at you in a contemptuous manner. In contempt is a legal expression, used when some person/organisation is said to be in contempt of court. It is also the name of a TV show. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contempt_of_court https://www.ourfamilywizard.com/blog/contempt-what-does-mean-family-...


1

English requires extra work for specifically pinpointing time ranges and time spans. You cannot merely rely on the prepositions. You will need to be certain and possibly confirm that the listener understands when. Your question overlaps with English speakers use of This Wednesday, Last Wednesday, Next Wednesday. These things can be understood differently ...


2

When you say "Change the quantity of an order", it means to change the quantity of the idea of the order. When you say "Change the quantity on an order", it would usually mean that the order is a physical object, such as a piece of paper with an order written on it. It's the same thing for changing the date. Using "of" instead ...


1

I have never heard of Houston University. There is a University of Houston which you should use the definite article to refer to as "the University of Houston" because it is how the school is named. Also, it should be "a professor at ABC University" I am going to pilfer Hellion's answer on ELU as it is hard to improve upon. And since this ...


1

If you are involved in some kind of scandal, the media will get excited about it. The more excited they get, the more they will write/post/talk/speculate, and so more people will get to hear about it. Even if there's nothing to it, people will think "there's no smoke without fire". The accepted way to deal with this situation is to lie low. ...


1

"Stay away from" more clearly describes what is happening. The object of "from" in the phrase "lie low from ..." is normally the thing you are hiding from: A village in Burgundy offers a place to lie low from the police. — Alain Delon You could combine both to say He should lie low and stay away from social media until the ...


2

[1] Sort [by extension]. [2] We came [by the back road]. In these examples "by" is a preposition functioning as head of the bracketed PPs (preposition phrases). In [1] the PP is an adjunct expressing how something is to be sorted. In [2] the PP is a complement of "came". PPs expressing path are complements because they have to be ...


0

It would be - "unleashing the dogs onto the crows" I will start by explaining the difference between in and on."on" is used when something is positioned above something else or on the surface of something."in" is used when something is inside something or surrounded or enveloped by a thing. e.g Lie down on the floor The painting ...


1

Either form works grammatically, and which one sounds more natural varies by region both both can be understood. Overall, using "on" will often sound more natural. Leaving it out will often sound more clipped. It seems more common to leave it out in a printed context where extra letters may cost more to print. It is one of those things are are left ...


-2

To run - movement from inside a room to the balcony outside the room. Hence, run to. Run 'out on the balcony' - no movement from inside a room out on the balcony. I already was there. I decided and I ran in that place, the balcony.


-1

Warned on September 6 means that the speaker delivered his warning exactly on sep 6. Warned sep 6 refers to a date. I warned people that sep 6 2020 would be a poignant date. The speaker delivered his speech weeks or months ago.


0

'to' is directed towards only one person, whereas, 'with' includes both people. Example: John was talking to Smith. John was speaking with Smith. In the first sentence, only John is speaking. In the second sentence, a conversation of two people is implied.


1

The meanings are very similar, but not quite the same. Saying the material will be released on this website means that the material will be placed on this website. That is, you will come to this website and the material will be there. Saying the material will be released through this website means that you will come to this website and, through some means or ...


1

by = through/by the means of. from = starting point. Therefore shaken by gives an immediate result - the experience shook him; giving an immediate reaction to go home. shaken from would continue with a resolution which would have a more permanent action - shaken from the experience I would no longer enter that room!


2

I know that ending sentences with prepositions should be avoided… There is no such rule in English as actually practised by real English speakers and writers—not in informal speech, not in formal writing. This so-called ‘rule’ against ‘preposition stranding’ is an artificial fabrication of confused grammarians of the 17th century, whose ideas of English ...


4

Yes, you need to add a preposition before. But He reads books afternoons. is OK (see here), if a little terse or poetic. You may need to clarify the sense of your sentence. Is the afternoon the time when he usually reads, or is reading what he usually does in the afternoon?


0

Since a quad is an open plane, a building is on it, and not in it. Also, on the left-hand side; on the north side, etc.


1

I can't give you any promises that your late response will be acknowledged. It should be promises because it's a countable noun. Again, I can't give you any promises about that. about and of collocate well with promise, but I don't see anything particularly wrong with the other two. A sentence with promise as a verb I can't promise you anything/it. ...


0

I'd say, 'We need to facilitate information flow within but not outside the company.'


3

The phenomenon to which you refer is called preposition stranding where a preposition is not in its natural place. Despite what you may have read authorities disagree about whether it is always to be avoided. The Wikipedia article on preposition stranding gives much detail about the controversy. It is alleged that the practice started with attempts to import ...


2

Ending a sentence with a preposition like 'of' is not a big issue in spoken or informal language. You should only be concerned if you are writing in a more formal context, which is unlikely in this case since the sentence is a question.


1

When it comes to a road, or a street, "in" the road means something is actually occupying the road surface where cars drive, for example: There is a man standing in the road. We refer to all the buildings etc that may be at either side of a specified road and use that road name as their address as being "on" the road, for example: ...


3

Neither of them is correct. The appropriate preposition here would be for or among or between. What is your preference for cars? What is your preference among cars? What is your preference between cars? Note that I have made car plural here. I would have to say none of these sounds very natural to me and I would probably change the whole sentence Which ...


Top 50 recent answers are included