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3

Be very leery about using the word only when giving rules about English. You wrote: you only use the proposition 'on' with nouns that refer to groups of people The three example nouns you provided – team, board, commission – indeed typically use on instead of in. However, I thought of three other nouns (there are probably a few more) that can refer to ...


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The neutral word here is on: we blow on (or onto) things unless we are definitely blowing inside them (eg a balloon, or somebody's mouth when giving them resuscitation). But in somebody's face is the word we use when we talk about doing something to somebody via their face: blowing, hitting, spraying, smiling, shouting. If we are talking about applying ...


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Blowing air at a persons face is a very rare action. If you "blow in his face" it suggests an annoying action. We could also say "She threw a cup of water in his face". If you blow smoke at someone it is nearly always annoying: nobody wants to breath your smoke. On the other hand "blow on his face" could be to warm it, or as a lover's game. It is a ...


1

The meaning of "from" and "of" are slightly different. We say "made of a substance" (made of rubber). But we say "made from something already made for some other purpose" (made from rubber tires). For example "made of glass", but "made from old Coke bottles". Or "made of paper", but "made from old magazines". These are only general trends in meaning, ...


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I think there is a difference. I can't find the definition you wrote, "is to deal with a successful situation or problem", in the source you linked. The second meaning of "manage" in Macmillan is to deal successfully with a problem or difficult situation That is not the definition of "manage with" but just of "manage". I can't find "manage with" in ...


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"For better or for worse" is a common and very old idiom. It means "under any conditions", as you probably already know. The expression appears in the poem Confessio Amantis, written circa 1386 in Middle English: "For bet, for wers, for oght, for noght." (rougly translated "for better, for worse, for something, for nothing") It later appeared as ...


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Dignity is a noun, meaning "the state or quality of being worthy of honour or respect." "WITH" as a preposition means: "accompanied by (another person or thing)" or "having or possessing (something)." Dignity in this case... "IN" also a preposition means either: "inside a container, place, or area", "surrounded or closed off by something", or "forming a ...


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You can't really go wrong with "with". As FumbleFingers mentioned in their comment, both prepositions can be used, and using "in" won't change the main essence or meaning of the sentence - the focus will remain on "dignity". Google results: "with" is more common in AmE Google Ngram shows both "to live in dignity" and "to live with dignity" were commonly ...


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For is fine here, although to is more common. If thing A is attractive to thing B, it means that thing A finds thing B to be attractive. Typically, if thing A is an inanimate object, for will nearly always be used. If thing A is a human, for will usually be in the form thing A is attractive for person B to do thing C. (I hope that isn't too many things.) ...


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To speak a language can refer to specific acts of speaking, or to one's ability, or customary behaviour. To speak in a language is used only for specific acts of speaking.


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This is an antiquated usage that you would find in the King James Bible or other writing from the 16th or 17th century. Extrapolating from the OED definition you have provided, we can assume its meaning is something like 'by' or 'for'. If someone does something 'unto oneself', they are doing it for themselves or by themselves. If a person is a 'law unto ...


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This kind of thing can vary by (English-speaking) country, and even by region. Your first sentence would be idiomatic pretty much anywhere, but the second sounds more American English-esque to my (British) ears. If I'd written, "He'll come home Friday" in an English high school essay, I suspect I'd have lost a mark. Something similar can sometimes be seen ...


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I think you have discovered that "on" is not always required when giving a day. The word "Friday" is normally a noun, but it can (sometimes) function as an adverb. The function of "the day of our party" is also functioning as an adverb. It is rather unusual in written English. It is quite common enough in spoken English.


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Your sentences are both problematic in several respects. Correcting bad grammar is not what we do on this site but here are some suggestions. Whereas does not work in your example. Whereas balances or compares one thing against another. You will find numerous examples of its use online. Jane does not have the qualifications for this job whereas Margaret ...


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The key is whether the event can strictly be defined as temporal or whether it would best be defined as spatial. I'm past the pizza shop. describes the event temporally. I've passed the pizza shop. describes it spatially. Left, in this context would imply you had already called in at the pizza shop a few minutes ago, but were now on your way home. ...


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Let me answer this question myself. According to the Google Trend comparison, I guess my original thought (i.e., 'during the interval' is grammatical) is wrong. 'For the interval' is the most idiomatic usage, at least according to the search result. The possible rationales behind this would be; i) an interval is a sort of like an amount of time, so using '...


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Native English speaker answer. I have been a University lecturer (in Science, not in English, but with many non-English undergraduate and postgraduate students). A really common mistake that non-native speakers make is the original poster's Case 1. Sentences of the form "It allows to do something" should not be used. Here's a typical sample that I found in ...


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It's a distinct construction in English. The second noun phrase serves as an adjective modifying the first one. If you want a term for it, the second noun phrase is an "adjective equivalent". This construction is customary only for a few kinds of attribute: mostly size, color, and price—and not with very consistent syntax. I think you'll find that most ...


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... shown in the video ... That is fine. "By" would work if you said something like this This video has been recorded by a CCTV camera on the corner of ... "The footage showed Chang purposely lowering his head to avoid being captured on video by the CCTV in the lift." - google In your sentence, "from" is the the appropriate choice. "The video ...


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“From” should be used to explain the source of the video. “On video” means a video is the type of record—not a book. “Upload to” a specific site. “In a video” means there may be other content. Otherwise it would be better to say, “the video shows” something


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These tiny flowers transform into [ pulp-filled pods almost the size of rugby balls ]. A preposition is not required. "Almost the size of rugby balls" is a noun phrase functioning as modifier in the larger bracketed noun phrase. "Almost" is an adverb modifying the noun phrase "the size of rugby balls". Adverbs freely modify noun phrases (though only ...


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in emphasises location Because "this school" can be a physical place as well as an organisation, the meaning of "in" and "at" in these sentences is subtly different. When dealing with an ambiguous subject like "this school" or "the Louvre", the use of "in" more strongly implies a location. Thus, saying "in this school" leads the reader to think of the ...


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Firstly, as Elizabeth suggests, your sentences start incorrectly. Normally we'd just say: I found an error But if you really want to use "there": I found an error there I found there's an error (I found [that] there is an error) For the second part, you can just say: I want to report it to them There is no need for on or about, as the verb ...


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When I listened to that clip, I could absolutely not hear Ms. Streep saying "with". It sounded like she said, "I c'n ... deal ....... my own disasters". However, in American English, we don't talk about "dealing a disaster". We exclusively deal with disasters. So I'm pretty sure she must have said "with", and either that word was so quiet as to be ...


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You express support for a cause. You can express that support to a particular person or group. Alice expressed to Bob her support for the new policy. Alice expressed her support for the new policy. (To whom Alice expressed her support is not stated.) Alice expressed her support to Bob. (What Alice supports is not stated.) Alice supports the ...


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I think the simple answer is ellipsis. These tiny flowers transform into pulp-filled pods (that are) almost the size of rugby balls. These are not two noun phrases; they are two clauses joined by an elided conjunction and verb. I'll explain below but first let's talk about noun phrases because I think you might be missing something. Nouns can be ...


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He's by the door. This means he is right next to the door. He can just touch the door. He's near the door. He's close to the door. These 2 mean the distance between him and the door is small but probably not enough for him to touch the door. These 2 mean the same thing.


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When we discuss an activity done while a sound or sounds are being made (for example, while music is playing), we use the 'to' preposition: dance, hum, tap fingers, move, etc to the music. to preposition (AT THE SAME TIME AS) at the same time as music or other sound: I like exercising to music. He left the stage to the sound of booing. To (...


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"Approach" means "move nearer to": So you can't say it that way because it would mean: I am moving nearer to to the beach. To address some things others have brought up: I am approaching from the beach. What has happened here is that the destination has been omitted (probably due to it already having been established). Consider a conversation: ...


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You can either say: Students studying in 5th grade or below are not allowed to go on this trip. or Students studying below 6th grade are not allowed to go on this trip. In the first case, below acts as an adverb modifying 5th. In the second case, below acts as preposition, and in is not needed in the phrase.


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I think the missing word here is not an additional "to", but an "as": Aston Martin’s IPO will provide further clues as to which category ultra-expensive carmakers really belong. The phrase "as to which" is often used in contexts like this one. From Longman: as to something a) concerning something advice as to which suppliers to approach We both ...


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IMHO the use of "by" in "have dinner by candlelight" is something like an abbreviation for "by way of" or "by means of." In English we have the expression "to read by the light of the moon," and there's a song called "Stella By Starlight," where in both cases the idea is that something is being seen by means of moonlight or starlight as the source of ...


2

No, both all and all of are correct (although usage of all of has been growing lately). However, in your particular example, I would remove the, so the phrase looks like this: I'm not sure if all 3 topics are there. OR I'm not sure if all of the 3 topics are there.


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Can we use a percentage after both of these sentences? Yes. "Percentage" can be used like "amount" and "number". In 2005 the production of steel reached a low of 5%. This is grammatically correct. We often use "a low of" and "a peak of". In 2005 the production of steel reached a low at 5%. This means the same as the above (of), but less common. As @...


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We had a chat (while) drinking a cup of coffee. This describes two activities taking place at the same time. We had a chat over a cup of coffee. This expresses the coffee as the context in which the chat took place. You might think of the coffee as the foundation ("underneath") of the chat, hence, the chat is described as being "over" the coffee.


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I'm surprised that none of the answers here provide the simplest answer, which is the correct answer: yes. Explanation: In the examples you gave, you are referring to things in the instrumental case. As explained in the linked article: The instrumental case ... is a grammatical case used to indicate that a noun is the instrument or means by or with ...


0

I have a theory, it could be totally wrong, just guessing. It seems to me that the "by" in "by candlelight" is an exception, something that doesn't fit and shouldn't be, if English were as systematic as possible. And I have a guess of why it came to be: German. "Bei Kerzenlicht" is completely normal German, and might explain the "by" in English, when it ...


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I hope I could do something. I would use this sentence to describe a hypothetical contingency: “If my neighbor were in danger, I hope I could do something.” I hope I can do something. Something needs doing. “The dog's leg is caught in the net! I hope I can do something.” This is not really an offer to help, but more of an observation to a friend. I ...


3

It is an idiom, not to be taken literally. "To be in X's face" means to be "too close for X's comfort."


2

The problem word here isn't "into", but rather "within" - it just doesn't fit here. Inexact time: "Within {duration} of {point in time}" "Within ... of" is used to state that something is close to something else. Take this example: "the second runner finished within two minutes of the winner's time" You're stating the upper limit of the difference ("two ...


4

You can say: She wrote the answers by pen. (deleting the article "a") Similar published examples are: Translation of Thought to Written Text While Composing: protocols were substantially longer than what he could write by pen Report of Cases Under the Workmen's Compensation Act: he was going to write by pen but his pen didn't have any more ...


4

She wrote the answers by a pen. It would sound more correct to say: The answers were written by a pen. However, you wouldn't say this, as the pen was not the agent of intent, it didn't write anything of its own. You would say: She wrote the answers with a pen. This implies that the pen was a tool that was used, and sort of hints at collaboration....


22

Nope! In all three of the sentences at the end of your question, by indicates location: beside, near, next to, nearby (though the meaning could be shifted by context). To indicate that the pen, the tumbler, or the bowl were the means, you would need another word: She wrote the answers with a pen. He usually drinks coffee using a tumbler. She ate ...


3

"by" only works with certain means In the case of your three examples, they should use different prepositions: She wrote the answers with a pen. He usually drinks coffee from/in/with a tumbler. She ate spaghetti from/in a bowl instead of a plate. "by" is usually a means involving the larger situation "with" is usually more an indication of a ...


1

What it means It means that her patients won't be able to consult with her on Monday and on consecutive days after that (the rest of the week). (You guessed correctly.) With some adjectives or nouns for a time interval or a specific time, English doesn't require a preposition to make them function adverbially. For example: Janice returns to work next ...


1

to kick in an amount to some thing = to contribute an amount to it. Why are you interested in using that verb? Usually, kick in means contribute some amount of money to something. Money is not usually kicked into an account. Money is kicked in as a contribution to buying someone a gift or to having a party, for example. I kicked in $`10 to the party fund....


1

Both prepositions, of and with work after experience but the choice is likely to depend on the context. For example, it is more natural to say: I don't have much experience of mountain climbing indicating that the speaker is relatively new to mountain climbing and implying that s/he would not wish to tackle difficult climbs. On the other hand, you ...


2

If you have a bucket, you can have a hole "in" the bucket (in the metal of the bucket). If the bottom of the bucket has the hole you can say "There is a hole in the bottom of the bucket". It is in this way that the song (humourously) says "Theres a hole in the bottom of the sea". It means "a hole in the rock that contains the sea". Normally "At the bottom ...


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It depends on the context. Here is an example of each preposition: There is a white house at the bottom of my street. There is a hole in the bottom of the bucket. There is a stain on the bottom of the pan.


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They are basically all correct, but they don't all mean the same thing. Their meaning depends on the difference in meanings between at/in/on. Bottom itself also has a couple of meanings. It can refer to specifically the surface/edge, to one side of the surface, or to the entire lower volume/area. Which one is meant can usually be figured out by whether at/...


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