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1 vote

Which sounds more natural: "someone with (the) phone number…" or "someone at (the) phone number 128…"?

(background, 30+ years Canadian English, another 30+ in the States now) Neither sounds natural to me (in particular, I don't think I've ever used kindly in that context). I'd probably split it into ...
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0 votes

Two usages of the preposition "for" I'm not sure about

Webster's definition 2a. for As being or constituting. In your examples I finally saw him as being what he [truly] was. I have a sagging bag constituting [that constitutes] my belly.
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1 vote

Which sounds more natural: "someone with (the) phone number…" or "someone at (the) phone number 128…"?

None of the ways suggested by the OP are natural-sounding. People, and even more so patients, are not usually identifiable by their phone numbers. Imagine if that were really the case, it would mean ...
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0 votes

Two usages of the preposition "for" I'm not sure about

I think there is something inherently wrong with the question. There is a reason why modern dictionaries increasingly opt for "used to...", "used when...", "if you..., you...&...
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4 votes

Which sounds more natural: "someone with (the) phone number…" or "someone at (the) phone number 128…"?

With can imply that the phone number 12837487383 belongs to the patient. At simply answers "where can I reach the patient?" - but there is no implication that the phone number belongs to the ...
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0 votes

Does the meaning of a sentence change when I change the order of the adverbial (preposition) phrases in it

Yes, at least the connotation changes for those examples. Both are somewhat ambiguous, but to me, they hint at the following: "We spoke on the phone for the first time," could mean the two ...
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1 vote

Do you write posts "on", "for", or "in" social media groups?

In this case of using "group", the preposition "on/in" are both viable. But we usually do not post on/in a group, it is post on a site.
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1 vote

two "in"s in a row

Your premise is not really correct; it is possible either to "fill in" a blank or to "fill" a blank. (You can go to Google Books and search for a phrase such as "fill all of ...
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-1 votes

Differences between "a X of a Y" and "the X of a Y"?

Businessman sitting on a backseat of a car using smartphone and looking around. The above sentence is not correct. Correct one :- A businessman is sitting in the backseat of a car using a smartphone ...
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1 vote

Is "spaced by 1 meter" correct English?

"Spaced apart" may be commonly used, but it is a horrible grammatical error called a pleonasm (like "round circle", "kicking with your feet", "foot pedal" - &...
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0 votes
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In the expression "Elevator up" is "up" a preposition or an adverb?

It's an adverb. Lexico (definition 1.5) has: [as exclamation] Used as a command to a soldier or an animal to stand up and be ready to move or attack. But in your sentence I think it's a brusque ...
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3 votes
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is "capturing moments for social media" correct?

On is probably better than for - if you use for you're implying that they capture the moments to post later, whereas if you use on, you're suggesting that they are capturing them to post live. ...
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0 votes
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where vs at where

TL;DR: The preposition is technically correct, but it sounds strange to many English speakers, so omitting it is probably best. First of all, let's deal with "where" alone. In that case, the ...
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0 votes

where vs at where

The word where can replace at what place, so the combination at where is redundant. In your example, though, this would be grammatical: A new roundabout will be added at the place where the south road ...
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0 votes

'Obsessiveness about' or 'obsessiveness with'

I think "obsessiveness with" is more correct, even though I don't think in the dialect and academic writing, people will often use the word "obsessiveness"
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0 votes

Should I use "previous experience in" or "previous experience of"?

My first instinct was that we use "experience in" in a professional/skill context and "experience of" for more personal/occasional things. However, when I set out to double-check ...
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-1 votes

"to pull all of the data" vs "to pull all the data"

They both sound fine to me, and sound identical in meaning.
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3 votes

to have confidence in sb

I don't know if this is cultural, but it seems very clear that in an organisation, confidence should go both ways. The people at the bottom and the people at the top both have jobs to do. The ...
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2 votes
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In preposition usage

Yes. "in" in that context means "out of": 4 out of 10 people are working full-time; the rest (6 out of 10) are working part-time. The first google definition of "composition&...
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2 votes
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during an interview vs. at an interview?

I would give "during" a very slight preference but either "during" or "at" are otherwise fine. I don't particularly care for the "our learning" in the original ...
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5 votes
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Which preposition do I use with a URL?

The abbreviation “URL” is new enough that I doubt a rigid usage has developed. However, I’d recommend “at.” First, a “URL” is called an address, and usage decrees that the preposition “at” is used for ...
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1 vote

Is " of him" or " for him " followed by the infinitive?

Given a construction like It is [adjective] [of/for] him to [verb phrase] Here are some general rules: We can use of him whenever the adjective could reasonably be applied to him. This can often be ...
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  • 1,663
2 votes
Accepted

Whether to use a preposition in this sentence construction

You should keep "with". Here is what the phrasal verb cover over means: Put something on top of something else so that it is completely hidden. (Longman) The female lays a single egg and ...
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1 vote
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over/in the past/last years

Yes, those changes are grammatically valid, and will make no significant differences in meaning. More specifically all of: Life has changed a lot in the last thirty years. Life has changed a lot over ...
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1 vote

over/in the past/last years

For all intents and purposes, all four mean exactly the same thing. Life has changed a lot in the last 30 years. Life has changed a lot over the last 30 years. Life has changed a lot in the past 30 ...
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4 votes

throw something at/to someone

We throw something to an animal or person for them to receive. We throw something at a person, animal, or thing as an act of playfulness, aggression or rudeness, or (for a person) when we don't care ...
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1 vote

Who did you say that to?

The sentence: Who did you tell about that? sounds strange but is possible. It would sound completely natural if you simply added an object. Who did you tell about that accident? If you omit about, the ...
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1 vote
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Who did you say that to?

The first definitely needs either the "about" or a trailing "to" and in the second it should be "say" not "said". That is: "Who did you tell about that&...
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0 votes

Not by somebody VS by not somebody

”She is being thought about not by him (but by someone else)” Here, ”by him” is a prepositional phrase. We cannot place ’not’ between the preposition ’by’ & its object ’him’. Therefore, ”by not ...
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1 vote
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"Go doing something *to* somewhere"?

Yes, you can. It's grammatically correct, but which word is to be emphasized? With nothing emphasized it seems to need "...but not to the Gobi Desert" (or some place). "He will swim ...
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0 votes
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It can be controlled from the software

You are right that controlled using or controlled on is more usual and reads more naturally in this context. However, controlled from is also correct. The differences between these three are in the ...
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0 votes

launch ... to/into space

"Into" implies the subject arrived in space (and stayed there for a significant amount of time), whereas "to" simply emphasizes direction. In your second quote, for example, the ...
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1 vote

What are we in for today?

If you are 'in for' something (usually bad) it means that thing will happen to you soon. I was caught stealing. I am in for a punishment when my father finds out. Our office has received 5000 orders. ...
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0 votes

I'll be gone IN or ON the train?

I'll have gone by train. I'll be going on the train. I'll be going by train. Will you be there? No, I'll be gone, by train.
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0 votes

"I haven't received the confirmation letter via/by/from email"

Your sentence, whether it uses "via", "by" or "from", draws attention to the means of communication, when what is important is that you haven't received the confirmation. ...
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1 vote
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"I haven't received the confirmation letter via/by/from email"

The most natural ways to say this generally avoid propositions. You can refer to the confirmation you are expecting as a confirmation email or an email confirmation. I haven't received the [email ...
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1 vote

Double "in", is it natural?

It is not really a problem, the two "in"s are different in function. The first is part of the phrasal verb "live in", and the second is a prepostion. However, as there are very ...
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3 votes

Understanding "of" use in "all I could think of was"

In this context, think of means the same thing as think about. This is a complex sentence, but let’s pull out the main clause of it: all I could think of was [....] This is saying that the speaker ...
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2 votes
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Which preposition to use when talking about the speed of processing a document?

Both on and with sound plausible. Another option is for. Without more familiarity with the context/genre it is hard to say which is most natural.
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1 vote

Meaning of "for stem cell interventions"

The meaning of ,, stem cell intervention'' is a simple stem cell treatment. Actually, it is about treatment rather than an intervention. An intervention is more suitable for a surgical operation (...
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-3 votes
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Understanding "of" use in "all I could think of was"

It's shorthand for: "all I could think of (from all possible thoughts) was X"
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32 votes

Understanding "of" use in "all I could think of was"

In this case, of is a part of a larger phrasal verb--in this case, 'to think of.' To think of something is to be reminded of it, to consider it, or to make an opinion about it. It is almost a synonym ...
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