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4 votes

Is “That store sells watches for one dollar each” grammatically correct? Are there better alternatives to this sentence, such as with “at”?

Yes, "for" is completely fine. I wonder where you heard this rule, because I can't think of any cases where it holds. You can buy, sell, distribute, purchase, or do any other commerce-...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
4 votes

Is “That store sells watches for one dollar each” grammatically correct? Are there better alternatives to this sentence, such as with “at”?

For is the way that it would most likely be expressed. How much did you pay for that? How much do you want for that? I got it for a song [very little money]. They sold their house for nearly $700,000....
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

If there're several figures in a category shown in a chart, can I say "The percentage of something IN the category FOR..."?

In any type of report there must be an introduction. The author tells the reader which activities (sports) are being compared and explains that "other sports" refer to sports other than ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.3k
0 votes

How to interpret ambiguous phrases like "John knows the father of Sam and Leon" with no context?

The ambiguity lies in that you're attempting to interpret the written representation of a segment of a spoken conversation stripped of context, nuance, and inflection. A normal speaker would slur over ...
digimunk's user avatar
  • 215
0 votes

arrange in or arrange into?

Arrange in order is fine. This Ngram shows that arrange in is much more common than arrange into. We would use into for sorting things into different groups, in for a single sequence such as 'arrange ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.5k
1 vote

care of or care for

The second one is correct because care as a noun is normally followed by of, but as a verb by for. The expectant parents were taught about the care of a newborn baby. The new parents were taught how ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.5k
-2 votes

arrange in or arrange into?

"Arrange into." The reason is that "arrange in the correct order" is vague. You could be arranging a number of things...say items X, Y, and Z. Now you're supposed to start ...
digimunk's user avatar
  • 215
5 votes
Accepted

Correct message to notify users about errors in data

Simply showing "Segment error(s)" is your best bet. It's succinct and applies to a single error in that section or to multiple errors.
digimunk's user avatar
  • 215
3 votes
Accepted

How to interpret ambiguous phrases like "John knows the father of Sam and Leon" with no context?

As you surmise, the phrase "the father of Sam and Leon" can mean either "the father of both Sam and Leon" or "Sam's father and Leon"; but in general, we prefer "X's ...
ruakh's user avatar
  • 4,593
0 votes

Is "died by suicide" a correct use of preposition?

by introduces an agent. from introduces a cause. of introduces a proximate cause. I was ready to die of boredom. He died from boredom. *He died by boredom. boredom cannot be an agent so it's not ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
0 votes

The ring was put on in/at the wedding. - which is acceptable?

"in the wedding" refers to the wedding ceremony. "at the wedding" refers to the occasion. When is the torch lit? --In the opening ceremony. Or Did you see the torch get lit? --...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
1 vote

The ring was put on in/at the wedding. - which is acceptable?

We use "in" when the subject is actively taking part in an event. For example, This is not true. "The bride put on the ring in the wedding." This is an error, it should be "...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,579
1 vote

Is there any difference between the expenditure for something and on something?

This is similar to your recent question about among and for. The consumers spent their money on products. The table categorizes those products and shows consumption data for each category. The ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
3 votes

Is there any difference between the expenditure for something and on something?

Expenditure on is much more common, Cambridge uses 'on' as it's preposition in it's explanation of the word (Expenditure, Cambridge). also TextRanch says: Both 'expenditure for' and 'expenditure on' ...
Amirreza's user avatar
  • 167
0 votes
Accepted

"Please wait for another 5 minutes" or "Please wait another 5 minutes"?

Isn't for mandatory because 5 minutes is length of time? No. In "Please wait another 5 minutes", "another 5 minutes" is a noun phrase acting as an adverb (or to be more precise, ...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,579
1 vote

Which prepositions can be used to fill in the blank: "The smoking rate _____ women"?

the smoking rate for women is self-referential, the study referring to itself, to its category "women" and the data being presented for that category. for there means "pertaining to&...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
1 vote

Do we use a preposition after "use". For example:

No it is not correct. A better way to phrase it would be Grammarly is not allowed to be used in either quizzes or exams
Rohit Gupta's user avatar
1 vote

Which prepositions can be used to fill in the blank: "The smoking rate _____ women"?

'Among' is better than 'for', because the smoking rate is something that exists within that demographic rather than something that is being assigned to them, which the preposition 'for' could imply.
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
0 votes

Which is correct "in spring" or "in the spring"?

"the" being a definite article, specifies the spring you are talking about. If it's "in the spring" it's an specific spring you are talking about. If it's just "in spring"...
Matt Molina's user avatar
0 votes

Software on/under/in a computer

Side note: We don't say "a software". We say, "a piece of software" or "the software". We say that software runs "on" a computer. "This runs on my Foobar ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.3k
1 vote

Software on/under/in a computer

Under is fine when referring to software executing within a particular operating environment (whether the OS or even something more specific). In this case "under" is used to indicate that ...
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
0 votes

What does "a receipt for the money" mean?

Please note: I am only responding in this manner because I do not have the reputation to comment. I 100% agree with @gotube's answer. As to a general "rule" for those looking to improve ...
JustKillMe's user avatar
1 vote

"Items should be paid for within 14 days <of> <after> receipt." — What's the difference between "of" and "after" here?

I agree with what others have said in comments and +1 to FF. I want to add that your sentence (2) doesn't work because "within 14 days" and "after receipt" scan as two separate ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.8k
11 votes

What does "a receipt for the money" mean?

In the context of a receipt, the preposition "for" indicates what the receipt acknowledges the receipt of. If someone gives you $10 and you give them either a machine-printed slip of paper ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.8k
1 vote

"rise 2%" VS "rise at 2%" VS "rise by 2%"

"... rose x%" and "... rose by x%" always mean exactly the same thing: The new number is x% higher than the old number. "*... rose at x%", however, is ambiguous, at least ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.8k
0 votes

"rise 2%" VS "rise at 2%" VS "rise by 2%"

If something is rising at 2.5%, the rate is currently 2.5% but it is rising (it was maybe 2.4% last month and 2.3% the month before that). If inflation is falling at 2.5% then it's still 2.5% but it's ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 2,389
2 votes

"Items should be paid for within 14 days <of> <after> receipt." — What's the difference between "of" and "after" here?

As has been pointed out in comments, you can't use both within and after in this context. The dictionary example... Items should be paid for within 14 days of receipt ...is fine, but if the OP wants ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
0 votes

What is the preposition and object in this sentence: The first thing they saw was the colorful butterfly garden in front

front is the object of the preposition in. The phrase is locative and means "in the front" of something mentioned in context. Compare "an ice-cream sundae with a cherry on top"
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
0 votes

Verb "to convict" with prepositions

People are convicted of crimes, and they are convicted on charges. So, both of the following are incorrect: *The man was convicted on fraud. * The man was convicted of charges of fraud. The "...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
  • 3,201
0 votes

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

Firstly, afterwards is awkward; later is more natural. I.e. (1) reads better as, 'I didn't see her again until three days later'. The simple answer to your question is that until is never optional in ...
CraigF's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes

Verb "to convict" with prepositions

He was convicted of fraud "of" is followed by the actual crime that was committed. He was convicted on charges of fraud. He was convicted on fraud charges. "on" is followed by ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
0 votes

the percentage of something _____ the total

"in" and "out of" are correct, although "out of" is better. "to" is factually wrong, it implies a ratio of renwable energy, as in "The ratio of renewable ...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 1,887
0 votes

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

Until sets a limit at which point some condition ends. The structure will be: [some condition continues] until [a second condition occurs ending the first condition.] Ex. You must wait at the red ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
0 votes

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

"A few days afterwards" is ambiguous out of context. Is it a point in time, or is it a span of time? "Until a few days afterwards" makes it clear that it is a point in time being ...
nigel222's user avatar
  • 424
-1 votes

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

I didn’t see her again a few days afterwards. ...means someone might have expected you to see her a few days afterwards, but in fact you didn't! The until completely changes the phrase by qualifying ...
Francesco Dondi's user avatar
0 votes

Which one is more correct and natural "top up your phone 100 dollars" or "top up your phone with 100 dollars"?

The first one sounds more natural, but I would say something more like: If you would like to renew the service, you will need to top up your account with (at least) one hundred dollars. Using "...
Spehro Pefhany's user avatar
0 votes

Which one is more correct and natural "top up your phone 100 dollars" or "top up your phone with 100 dollars"?

This is an easy one for me (BE). If you need to renew the service, you'll have to top up your phone with 100 dollars. This is just telling the customer to add $100 to the existing balance. If it is ...
Robert Davies's user avatar
0 votes
Accepted

Which one is more correct and natural "top up your phone 100 dollars" or "top up your phone with 100 dollars"?

I suspect from the way you are writing that you are not actually describing topping up. To top up is to fill something to its capacity, generally from an initial state that is not entirely empty. For ...
Paul's user avatar
  • 211
10 votes
Accepted

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

"A few days" is a length of time. In the right context, the "for" is understood, as in your example with "waited". "A few days afterwards", however, is a point ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.8k
3 votes

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

The only times I can think of, where your second version without until would be idiomatic, is in response to a question in which you are denying the assertion of the question: Prosecutor: Isn't it ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
10 votes

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

QUESTION: (1) I didn’t see her again until a few days afterwards. my variant: (2) I didn’t see her again a few days afterwards. They mean different things. means a few days went by and then you saw ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.5k
0 votes

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

The sentence makes no sense without until. If you 'didn't see her again' full stop - never again - why mention 'a few days afterwards'? (1) means that a few days afterwards was the first time you saw ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.5k

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