New answers tagged

0

A book is written by an author A painting is painted by a painter. A meal is cooked by a cook or person. However, there is at least one case, if not more, where one might use OF: The exhibition showed works of A, B and C. If you want to emphasize who they "come from", you can use "of". And if there are several artists. The paintings of Rembrandt, van ...


0

The first version using "by" is correct, but I think the second version using "of" should be The exhibition features the work of VALIE EXPORT, Frieda Kahlo and Georgia O'Keeffe. This has work in the singular, because the noun work is being used in a different way. In your first version, the works are the works of art. In the second version, work is used ...


1

They're only really similar in specific contexts. For example, all the gold medals different countries have won at the Olympic Games. You can say "the table shows the medals per country", meaning that it shows how many medals each country has won. You can say "the table shows the medals by country", meaning that it shows a bunch of medals, that information ...


0

Normally it's damage to [something]. If it's spatial, you can cause damage on/under/near the surface of [something] (on top/on the side/on the wall/under the stairs).


1

A is the correct sentence. The grammar of sentence B may be correct but it is unnatural usage. I don't know of any specific rules to help with prepositions, because English doesn't have consistent rules for everything. Learning the correct use of prepositions comes from listening and practice. If anybody else can find a rule that has few exceptions, let us ...


1

In the given context It was Tuesday is more suitable. As you are beginning the story and nothing has been introduced it is correct, the second would be more appropriate where something has been introduced. For example: I really liked that party we went to! It was on Thursday.


2

I don't know what sort of "participation" is he talking about here? It's a category you are graded on. You may receive a score for attendance, midterms, finals, homework, class participation, etc. Is it class participation of a student? Yes And what should be the preposition before it? In or on? In that precise sentence, "on". He meant "marks ...


1

Answered in the comments: "You would not say concerned of either. It's concerned about and anxious about. Using of with either word is unidiomatic at best and ungrammatical at worst. If you insist on the specific phrase anxious of, then the answer here will be that it's wrong. You can change the word that comes before the preposition (such that of becomes ...


1

Neither is idiomatic, nor grammatical "Its one wheel was made in Germany" implies "It has one wheel", and "This wheel was made in Germany". The subject is singular, so you can't use the plural verb "are". The making of the wheel is in the past, so I've used a past tense verb. "One wheel of it was made in German" Is closer to what you probably mean. Again ...


0

Yes, however, it does change the meaning of the sentence. So as long as the second statement is true, it is appropriate. "Work in a school," refers only to the location where one works. "Work for a school", refers to your purpose and the organization to which one is employed. One can work for a school, but work for example at a public library. As a nurse, I ...


1

The form "ask something of someone" can be used for either inquiries and requests. I need to ask for the support of the team. (I want the team to do something. This may be a request for a favor, or a politely phrased order if it comes from a boss.) I am asking careful attention of you. (This is probably a polite order.) She was asking more of me ...


1

You can use ask for in the examples that you have given—you just don't have to. "Can I ask you for a favour?" "I'd like to ask for your advice/opinion on a financial matter." "You have to ask for permission to leave." Technically, I suppose that, in the first two cases, you would use ask for if you were intending to obtain the advice or favour in the ...


0

"I want to ask a few things of you guys" Technically, I could see how that could be asking them for favors also / asking them to do something for them. Mostly, it would be to ask a question, or in this case, a few questions. "I asked my sister for some favors" This could either be used in the past or present, I could see it being either. However, this is ...


2

Yes, the change of tense suggests whether the position is temporary or permanent. This choice of preposition suggests whether you are "in" (either physically or figuratively) the bank/school. So a freelance programmer "is working for a bank" this month, but a teacher "works in a school". The programmer could "be working for a school" next month, designing ...


0

Yes Both "to" and "over" have many meanings, and this is not really the central meaning for either of them. Yes, in this construction, the meaning of the two sentences is exactly the same, the difference is purely one of style. Both are comparing two things. Both sentences are quite correct and fully natural. I think this use of "over" is more common in UK ...


0

Heyy listen Of is used to show possession so In the sentence..... of shows a possession means ticket is your... Nd to is not only used for movement it is also used as infinitive means (to + verb)


4

According to Lexico.com, "for", as a preposition, can mean: Having (the place mentioned) as a destination. And is usually used with the verb "leave", as in: I'm leaving for Paris tomorrow. And after a noun which is going to a specified destination: I have to catch the train for Paris. "to", on the other hand, used when: Expressing motion ...


0

Yes. “He went running in the park” Means he went to the park in order to exercise by running. One could say also “He went running at the park,” which means the same thing. If we break the sentence down, “He went running,” - tells us what he did; “in the park,” - tells us where he did it.


0

“. . . but several episodes in . . .” used in the first sentence is the correct version. However, it needs to be understood that “several episodes in” is a slang expression which is linguistically incorrect in itself. Furthermore, both sentences are linguistically incorrect in that neither half expresses a complete thought: In the first half of both ...


1

he is in the chair ....he is on the chair .....Which one is right and why? Both are correct. He sat on the dining room chair He sat back in his chair and browsed the newspaper. It depends on what type of chair. A dinning room chair is most often just a seat with a back. You sit on it, like you would a stool. Whilst a fire side chair is usually of the ...


0

First, your example sentence is a little redundant. Typically, we'd say either: I prefer money over happiness. or: I choose money over happiness. This isn't to say your example is ungrammatical; however, it would be unusual to see, except perhaps in a special context, such as: Most people choose happiness over money, but I prefer to choose ...


0

If you're trying to say that money is more important than happiness to you, it should be: I prefer money over happiness. or I choose money over happiness. The construction "prefer to choose" is too convoluted for what I think you mean. Literally interpreted, your sentence indicates that you would choose money and not happiness, even if you had the ...


0

From my understanding of the intended meaning of these sentences, for is not required in these sentences. In your example, "I won't be able to talk any longer" the words "talk any longer" is what you won't be able to do. There is no need to have a for in the sentence as the meaning is clear without it. For is a word that can be used in many ways. In ...


0

A form of be with a past participle is the normal way of forming a passive in English. So being interviewed is the -ing form of be interviewed, which is the passive of interview. I look forward to being interviewed means roughly the same as I look forward to somebody interviewing me. She was afraid of being accused of a crime which she did not commit ...


2

For me, these are both fine: 'I am writing to express my complete dissatisfaction with the meal I was served last night.' 'She expressed deep dissatisfaction at the way the interview had been conducted.' Whereas this sentence sounds very wrong: 'I am writing to express my complete dissatisfaction at the meal I was served last night.' As a native English ...


6

In this sentence, "as" is a preposition. It means "In the role of": It forms a prepositional phrase which describes the role of the speaker. A person can have many roles in their life, and sometimes we want to emphasise that we are speaking with a particular expertise or perspective: As a parent, I am concerned about youth crime. In this case, the ...


0

Mostly “As” is used when you you are comparing two different things having some common similarities. Here are some basic uses:- Adverb- used for comparisons Eg: Her voice is sweet as honey. 2.Conjunction -to join 2 sentences(in the place of 'because') Eg: She did not go to school as she was not feeling well. 3.Preposition Eg: He was selected as the ...


1

a person's emotional state or the atmosphere of a place as communicated to and felt by others. in an interesting sentence fragment. from the comment, I gather that the full sentence would be something like: "Vibe" means a person's emotional state or the atmosphere of a place as communicated to and felt by others. If "to" were omitted one would have: ...


0

The appropriate preposition for a given verb is really just a matter of custom, and there is no real way to escape learning them with the verb. Many verbs have more than one suitable preposition, with different meanings: sometimes the meanings are very different indeed. For your examples the prepositions are: exchange of the engine intervention of the ...


0

[1] What's the trick to [getting this chair to fold up]? [2] some tricks [to speed up your beauty routine]. If clause is of the -ing type, then the preceding "to" is a preposition, and if the clause is an infinitival then "to" is a subordinator serving as a marker within the clause. Thus "to" is a preposition in [1] and a subordinator in [2]


1

In this case, the phrase "over one day" means "over the course of/duration of a single day." In particular, both sittings wherein the person referring to him or herself as "I" in the sentence read the 192 pages in French occurred on the same day.


0

Sentence two is better, because it is less ambiguous. "Both," in a way, establishes "trust in executive" and "legislative powers" as one unit, connecting them both to political interest. In sentence one, the connection between "trust in executive" and "political interest" is not as clear, because the former could be interpreted as distinct from "legislative ...


0

Some nouns + get mean achieve or obtain can be used like this: The trick to getting this chair to fold is [x] The solution to getting these voters to turn out is [x] The answer to getting more people at the park is [x] get x to means: to obtain or achieve or persuade Getting people to understand you can be difficult. Getting better quality/price ratios is ...


0

I've edited the title question (which appeared far too general and had been in part addressed on ELU before). There are a couple of particular usages involved in these specific examples. 'Is a trick to', like (the probably less informal) 'is a means to', can be followed by a present participial clause: This imperative is derived from a causal 'law' ... ...


3

"In the news" means that a subject is currently found across all news media - on TV or radio news broadcasts, or in newspapers etc. eg "The story has been in the news this week". "On the news" would be used to refer to a specific news broadcast or source. eg "I saw it on the news last night". Your example using "at the news" could refer to hearing "...


1

I'll start by analyzing the phrase: a chance at that dream Per the answer to this other question, the phrase a chance at [X] means an opportunity to achieve [X]. This fits with one of the definitions of chance: "a situation favoring some purpose; opportunity".1 Dream in this context means "a strongly desired goal or purpose".2 So "a chance at that dream"...


0

This is really two questions, but since they both involve of: Your first passage: If you paint the same face, and set a winged rose or a rose of gold somewhere about her, one's thoughts are of her immortal sisters, Piety and Jealousy, and of her mother, Ancestral Beauty, and of her high kinsmen, the Holy Orders, whose swords make a continual music before ...


2

"... in the ground" is correct. "Under" would not be wrong either. As an alternative, the word "underground" can be used as an adverb: "Carrots grow underground"


0

Neither is correct. I suspect what you mean to say is This project may increase global sales. If you want to stay as close as possible to the original, then say This project can raise sales at the global level. The latter will be understood and sound idiomatic even if a bit verbose.


0

The usual preposition to use with "level" is "at". Something is at a particular level. I would use the plural of "sale" too, and omit the definite article, since "sales" is general. This project can raise sales at the global level. The preposition "in" can be used with a different noun, say "market". In this case This project can raise sales in the ...


3

"In the entrance" suggests actually within the doorway or entrance passage, or perhaps just inside the door or opening. The speaker might even be partly blocking the entrance. "at the entrance" more generally suggests "somewhere near the entrance", perhaps just outside it. In many cases there will not be much practical difference of meaning.


2

upon (or on) means: at the time of reaching a place or doing something. Upon reaching the house, we parked the car in the driveway and went indoors. Upon crossing the garden, he saw a rabbit in the bushes. It is a literary word. People do not use it usually in conversations. Don't forget to call me as soon as you get there. [spoken language, no upon]. ...


2

Instead of immediately after, you could use when in these sentences, but not with the -ing form. Your sentences (with minor edits): Don't forget to call me when you get there. The recipe was so delicious that everyone licked their fingers when they finished it. Another reasonable option: Don't forget to call me as soon as you get there. The ...


0

It really depends on the verb being used. We can say: I went on a picnic yesterday. I went to a picnic yesterday. but not: I went at a picnic yesterday. However, we can say: I was at a picnic yesterday. We were on a picnic yesterday. (Note: this one sounds a little unusual with 'I' instead of 'we'.) but not: I was to a picnic ...


1

English club describes the following rules for using prepositions for time: at PRECISE TIME (e.g. at 3 o'clock, at night) in MONTHS, YEARS, CENTURIES and LONG PERIOD (e.g. in May) on DAYS and DATES (e.g.on Sunday) Also, When we say last, next, every, this we do not also use at, in, on. e.g. I went to London last June. (not in last June) ...


0

But can I use "when" in sentence like this? When should I book a meeting room for tomorrow meeting? or What time should I book a meeting room for for tomorrow meeting? "When" changes the meaning of sentence. So I cannot use "when" in this case.


0

From is telling that the teacher was FROM the time period that was few hours earlier. The second sentence is missing the preposition (from), and is not telling the relation between the teacher and the time. Hence it is grammatically wrong.


2

I believe you are asking the specific meaning of "under" in the first sentence. In context, it means "less than". As used it is not very specific, so it could be 1 day less than a decade or 3 years less.


2

Commuting means "travelling to and from a particular place. Usually traveling to and from work". It usually is used to talk about travelling by car, bus or train to work. It could be used to mean walking to work, but if you can walk to work, the distance can't be so great, and you might not consider it to be "travelling" or "commuting". Nevertheless, some ...


Top 50 recent answers are included