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1

This is a good example of how English must be confounding to learners. There are all sorts of grey areas which arise from the use of words like 'of' that are only settled by context. As @JasonBassford pointed out: The reviews of your clients can mean either 'the reviews that were made about your clients' or 'the reviews that your clients made about you. ...


0

The modified version of the sentence has a stranded preposition ("from"), that is separated from its object "which". That is a less formal style than a fronted preposition, as in "from which", but it's grammatical and understandable. It's common for such a preposition to be at the end of a sentence, like this: "They have a mental calendar which they can pull ...


1

The difference is that "worked the table" means that "being at the table" was the work, but "worked at the table" means that "you did some other kind of work while at the table". In this case "the table" is a special table set up with flags and books. And the job is to be at the table and represent HERO. Because the job is "being at the table" you can say "...


2

You can use either preposition. Neither is more 'natural' or 'better'. Put up verb 6a INTRANSITIVE ​OLD-FASHIONED to stay for a short time in a place that is not your home put up at/in: We put up at a cheap hotel. Put up (Macmillan Dictionary)


1

Gerund is a double parts of speech : partly a verb and partly a noun. "The advent of social media has had a huge impact on sharing information." Here, sharing is a gerund. Like a verb, it has an object 'information'. Like a noun, it is used as an object of preposition 'on'. "The advent of social media has had a huge impact on the sharing of ...


1

Outed is generally used to mean that someone's homosexuality has been revealed by a third party. People also talk about gays coming out (of the closet) when they declare their own sexuality. She's is an abbreviated form of she has. She has got up and gone off - in a hurry. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/outed


1

These are examples from this book: Google Books "The English Phrasal Verb" They are examples of some phrasal verbs where the greatest part of the meaning is carried by the particle. The evidence the book offers for that is a couple of references from literature where the verb itself has been dropped, and the particle is used as if it were a verb. The ...


0

I always think of and about you. That was good. if both of them fit in the sentence then they will most likely work together.


0

//A. You wanted to die rather than face yourself. B. You wanted to die rather than facing yourself. C. You wanted to die rather than to face yourself.// When we use 'rather than' both the verbs should be similar. It should be like rather die than face; or rather dying than facing. It shouldn't be that rather is followed by 'die' and than is followed by ...


4

“Decide for yourself” would mean you’re making the decision that is only for you. The consequences of your decision only affect you. For example: “I’m going to order chocolate ice cream, you decide for yourself what you want” “Decide by yourself” means you’re making the decision on your own without anyone else. The decision may or may not affect others, ...


0

Neither is natural. One doesn't hammer a nail into a spot. One hammers it into a wall or plank or similar at a particular point. Thus, prefer: to hammer a nail into the wall at this point/spot. If you were pointing to the spot, you would just say here.


0

As a native UK English speaker, I would say A seemed the most natural. The other two sound a bit "foreign" to me, but I can't really explain why and I'm too busy to start analysing it.


0

Prefer takes a direct object. That direct object can be an infinitive verb in "to infinitive" form ("I prefer to choose"). It can also be a gerund ("I prefer choosing") or a noun ("I prefer sandals"). Normally, if you're also mentioning the thing you don't prefer, you use "to" ("I prefer sandals to boots"). But in the example sentence, I would argue that ...


0

Stretch out is a common phrasal verb; originally it was a sort of intensified version of stretch, emphasising how far the stretching went; but I would say that today it is probably more common than plain stretch, except in the special meaning of "stretch a muscle as part of physical exercise or warm-up". So stretched out is more or less interchangeable with ...


0

If you are only asking about the specific question "What is the point doing something", either is fine and there is no difference in meaning. If you're interested in the phrase "the point ..." in general, the situation is more complicated, and I don't have an answer. (See my comments on the question.)


1

General rule: Above: It's usually used for positions. Example: The village is well above sea level. Over: It's usually used for number or time. Example: a. I have been waiting for over an hour. b. I got over ten likes on this answer. Other cases: If over is used for position, it means the directly above. But above can be directly or left or right above ...


1

You're right, the preposition is usually omitted, but it's not wrong; here is a similar example from Lexico: Karen's train was due in soon after 2, so I made my way back to the station, having to squeeze through a thick colonnade of cyclists in order to do so. It doesn't change the meaning, so "It's not due tomorrow." means the same and is much more ...


1

"Trends" is plural*. "Of" is the correct preposition to use in this instance See definition 6b Yes, trends is a suitable word here if you mean "the general direction of change". *A general rule (with many exceptions) is that nouns that end in "s" are often plural. A better rule is that nouns that both end in "s" and whose the second-to-last letter is not "...


1

Preposition usages also varies depending on which version of English you're speaking. U.S. English, for example, will use "different from" or different than" but British English will use "different to" which sounds very wrong to an American. Also, I'd agree that some of the examples you've posted are idioms that may use prepositions in ways not otherwise ...


0

These examples all don't depend on the preceding verb following a personal pronoun. In example a, have to is a standard prepositional verb meaning 'are required to', 'must'. In example b, you're right, 'swims' doesn't need a 'to' (unless you're swimming to a certain point in the swimming pool/lake/sea). In example c, 'to' combines with the preceding 'how',...


1

Nor was it under many, many minutes, that she could comprehend what she heard It means that not less than many minutes passed before she could comprehend. (It took her quite a while to understand.) So, "in many minutes" misses the "less than" meaning. though not in general backward to credit what was for the advantage of her family, though ...


0

"Other than" means except / but. The sentence sounds good if you say : I didn't see any person other than / except / but your brother. Or, I saw none other than your brother. Or, I saw none but your brother.


1

There is no rule that tells you what direct objects you can place after the verb travel. The two examples you give are both common. After that it's a question of how familiar the object (of travel) will sound. While you can safely say that you travelled a continent, it becomes less obvious that you can travel a country (depending on its size) or a region or ...


0

When the antecedent is 'place', 'in' is optional. But in this case, if we drop the preposition, the sentence sounds good. "This is not a safe place to live." (= This is not a safe place where you live). "This is not a safe place to live in." (= This is not a safe place in which you live / which you live in.) When the antecedent is another noun (NOT, '...


0

Neither is inaccurate, and both of the expressions are used, but "decrease in the" occurs about five times more frequently, so that is the expression that should be used. Here is a Google Ngram comparison Ngram "decrease in/of the" (You may note that both expressions seem to decrease after about 1980, but I think that is a reflection of the date of the ...


2

The rules about prepositions in English are admittedly messy and abound with apparent exceptions, but this one is straightforward. Restriction on relates primarily to what person or thing is restricted. Since his release from jail, the only restriction on Joe is his requirement to see his parole officer every Tuesday at 8 a.m. Restriction of relates ...


0

“She is in a baseball cap and red shoes” could be interpreted as” ... and nothing else”. Use “she wears a baseball cap and red shoes”. You put a key on a keychain or a key ring. Usually you have more than one key on a key ring.


1

The legal term is "extortion", or the related verb "extort" If the threat is to reveal a secret, the term is blackmail. The gangster extorted $1000 by threatening to set fire to the property. Jim was blackmailed by an ex-employee, who threatened to reveal the company's history of tax evasion. Both extortion and blackmail are crimes. "Under the ...


2

The use of prepositions is not determined by general rules. It is a mess of special cases. But the rules about determiners do follow general rules. Nouns that are proper names do not take determiners. Nouns that are mass nouns do not take determiners. Nouns that are countable nouns, are in the singular, and are not being used as proper names do require ...


2

I wouldn't put too much faith into "grammar checkers" online. Language is complex. Grammar and syntax, for example, can be easily manipulated, especially in conversational speech; the same word can have multiple meanings, which will completely change the sense of a sentence when used incorrectly; words or sentences can have varying levels of formality, ...


2

He has too many prepositions and not enough objects. It needs one less preposition or one more object, which can be shown more clearly by recasting the clause as a sentence. It would make sense to write: The assembly was called to propose a new law in which the higher classes would no longer be exempt from universal land tax. because it would make ...


3

You're right, both a and b could mean either that the journey could end in one hour from now, or that the journey will take one hour regardless of departure time. a. Can we get to the airport in an hour? b. He can get to the airport in an hour. As in a lot of cases you will come across in English, context is everything. An example of duality of ...


2

I got stuck in a bad situation. I got stuck on a question. I got stuck during my exam. By the way, your sentences are either strangely worded or totally incorrect even after we insert the correct preposition. But introduces a contradiction. The third question being difficult is not contradictory to the entire exam being difficult. Try: That was a ...


1

The phrase is wrong as written, but there's more than one way to fix it. You can remove to: … whether to support a U.S. move to reinstate Taiwan’s observer status at the World Health Assembly (WHA) or China’s opposition to it. You can add support: … whether to support a U.S. move to reinstate Taiwan’s observer status at the World Health Assembly (WHA)...


1

1.a. How far is it from the Earth to the moon? 1.b. How far is the Earth from the moon? 1.a. and 1.b. are pretty close to being identical. In practice, 1.a. would be more likely to be used if someone were planning to move something from the Earth to the Moon, or if someone were planning to travel from the Earth to the Moon. For example "That ...


1

"In" doesn't fit the context of "the formation of my character". You would use "in" or "on" depending on how you would speak about the subject in any other context. For example, you would say a person lives in a town, not on it - so if you were speaking about something having an influence in a geographical area you would say "it has an influence in [place]"....


1

to impute takes a direct object (the 'something' you mentioned) and an indirect object, often a person, specified by 'to', so the following would be correct: Even the obsequious guy who imputed violent behavior to Sam said sorry to him. This follows the many example sentences mentioned here in Lexico.


1

"persuade to" is entirely clear and conclusive: a person is persuaded to follow a particular course of action. "convince" relates to a state of mind. It is therefore appropriate "to convince somebody that he or she should do something", but "convince to" is simply not English.


0

Certainly, Work hard to stand out from the crowd. My suggestion in this example is" replacing "to" with "in order to", which is just its elaborate form. This is the definition of "in order to" by Longman Dictionary: in order to do something: for the purpose of doing something. I must add that after "in order to" we cannot use "ing+ verb". However, I ...


1

Personally, whenever I explain a search query verbatim to someone, I don't use "for": I searched "How old is Leonardo DiCaprio" on Google... Essentially, I'm treating the full search like direct speech. When one merely states the topic/person/object that they searched for, I feel like without the word "for," the sentence doesn't seem quite right. I ...


0

In US English, we say, "I live on this street." If a person is homeless, we say "He lives on the street" or "He lives on the streets". Note the subtle difference in wording: "He lives on THE street" means he's homeless. "He lives on THIS street" or "He lives on Maple Street" tells us his address. If a homeless person sleeps on the sidewalk on Maple ...


-1

I am so confused because according to Cambridge Dictionary: Live "on" the streets (or "on the street", AmE): To be homeless. I have also had time to look it up on the book Practical English Usage by Swan and this is what I have found: We generally use "at" to talk about addresses: She lives at 73 Albert Street. We use "in" (AmE "on") if ...


2

The usual phrase for the weekdays excluding the weekend is "during the work week" or just "during the week", not "in the week". "In the week" could mean all the days of the week, as for example in, "There are seven days in the week." Another way to refer to those days is as "weekday" or "weekdays": Merriam-Webster "weekday" "any day of the week except ...


-1

We don't use prepositions before a number of common time expressions beginning with next, last, this, one etc. I met him on Friday. ✔️ I met him on last Friday. ❌ I met him on Friday last. ✔️


1

In an informal setting, you'll likely encounter the sentence Who do you want to come with? This sentence is problematic, however, according to traditional English grammatical rules. You've likely heard something along the lines of "It is grammatically incorrect to end a sentence with a preposition" before. Ignoring examples where this rule falls apart (I ...


0

Both are appropriate prepositions to use with the verb “wipe.” According to Oxford English Dictionary, “wipe, v.”: a. transitive. To rub (something) gently with a soft cloth or the like, or on something, so as to clear its surface of dust, dirt, moisture, etc.; to clean or dry in this way. Also with complement. As you can see, both prepositions may be ...


1

With whom do you want to come? (formal) Who do you want to come with? (Informal) These two versions are usually found to be used.


1

Both are correct and sound totally natural, so you can't really go wrong here. That said, I believe "Of all the people..." is likely more common because brevity is used wherever possible by most native speakers. I think the more common way of saying the same thing would actually be to arrange the sentence differently and say "Kate sings better than anyone ...


1

As a generality the construction "He wipes X on Y" suggests that X is the active noun and Y is passive (being acted upon), whereas "He wipes X with Y" suggests that X is passive and Y is active. So if the napkin is being moved to wipe the mouth then "wipes his mouth with a napkin" is correct, but if the mouth is being moved to the napkin then "wipes his ...


1

Meaning of both sentences are same But, first one is not commonly used second one is better


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