46

With the "It's 2018" clause, both mean more or less the same thing (as Neil says). But without that clause to clarify, the implication would be quite different. I still use this phone would be something you say to emphasise the fact that generally-speaking, you still use the phone. If someone suggested you throw the phone away, for instance, you could say "...


38

You can use the past tense, if you are talking about what the person who was photographed was doing. But normally, when you look at a picture you describe the things in the picture in the present tense. The picture doesn't change, it's always the same. It's the same type of thing as describing what's depicted in a painting. Especially if the painting doesn'...


36

Watch out. The answer is going to be far more complicated than you ever expected, but once you understand it, you will understand something very important about English grammar. This year Both sentences mean almost the same thing, and both sentences are strange. How do your parents punish you this year? suggests that my parents long ago planned out a ...


17

Good question! While they seem like they ought to mean similar things, the present continuous and present simple tend to be used in different situations. The present continuous is used for the specific action that is presently occurring, while the present simple applies more generally. For instance, if someone asked me "What are you doing?" I would ...


16

Verbs of inner state, unlike most verbs, do not normally take the progressive in English. So I think (I feel, I believe) are the ordinary unmarked forms. When they are used with the progressive, this is "marked" - not the normal form - and generally emphasises that the inner activity is going on at this very moment. So if somebody says "I'm thinking ...


16

It'll take us four hours to get to the coast, so you can sleep while I drive. Here, while can (but does not necessarily have to) mean whereas. If said alone without more context, I would interpret it as "I will drive for the full four hours whereas you can sleep." It'll take us four hours to get to the coast, so you can sleep while I am driving. Here, ...


15

In a context like this there is no substantive difference between the simple present and the progressive present: both designate a current activity. In Present-day English, however, the simple present 'marks' the utterance as distinctly formal; it would be used, for instance, in a legal or bureaucratic notice (We write to inform you . . .), or in an ...


15

One is simple present tense while the other is present continuous. Use simple present whenever you want to indicate something you do frequently. Every friday, I go to the mall. Use present continuous whenever you want to indicate something you do in this very moment. See ya later, I am going to the mall. In this case, you could use either, frankly....


15

As has been pointed out, in some contexts, while can mean whereas / on the other hand / contrariwise. But no native speaker would interpret OP's cited example like that without a couple more words to make it obvious exactly where the contrast lies (between what speaker and addressee are able to / must do)... 1: ... so you can sleep, while I have to / must ...


14

If you are relating an incident which started and finished sometime in the past with no present relevance, then you would not use the present perfect. So, I was locked in the elevator for five hours is the likeliest choice for your context. If you call someone from the elevator to report that you are trapped, then I have been locked in the elevator for five ...


13

When describing what is present in the picture we tend to use present tense: That is granddad. He is wearing a hat. The continuous form is used, although it might not be "logical", at any rate we treat the picture as if it were happening now. It's not required, and if you use a past time you'd also use past tense That was granddad in 1951. He was ...


12

It is possible to use the present progressive (present continuous) tense to give instructions, but not in the ordinary sense. Instead, when we use the present continuous to give instructions, we do so only to give a very strong command or order--or a humorous parody of such. (However, it is also possible, and more common, to issue strong commands or orders ...


12

We can express intention more simply: Are you going to the pub tonight? If you want to use "planning": Are you planning on going to the pub tonight? Are you planning to go to the pub tonight? Do you plan to go to the pub tonight? Yes, the continuous is idiomatic, but with planning on or planning + marked infinitive. P.S. If you want to ...


12

As you may know, the simple present tense is used for natural, repeating, or habitual activities. The present continuous is used for current and ongoing activities, things that are in progress. In this case, do you habitually use your phone every day? Or are you using it continuously? It's kind of the same thing, don't you think? It's just two slightly ...


12

It helps to give the context surrounding the quote and a link to the text. After some googling, I found this script for The Importance of Being Earnest: JACK. Do you mean to say you have had my cigarette case all this time? I wish to goodness you had let me know. I have been writing frantic letters to Scotland Yard about it. I was very nearly offering a ...


11

The sentence as provided is incorrect. While your rephrasing is grammatically right, it's still a little awkward. I would say either "your behavior has a negative influence on me" or simply "you are influencing me negatively."


10

The present continuous sense in that case is used to emphasize the fact that right at the moment of speaking she treats me nicely, even though at other times she and I might not like each other. For example you and your friend are talking to her in a coffee shop then you two go to the toilet and talk privately together: You know she hates me right? But ...


10

You use the present simple… …to state facts or general truths. : Hair grows. …to express habits or customs: I usually go home at 6 o'clock. …to describe a course of action: First I have lunch. Then I meet my friends. Finally I go home. You use the present progressive... ...to talk about temporary actions that are ongoing now.: I'm going ...


9

The general "rule" is that with stative verbs—verbs which express a state rather than an event, such as know, love, see—English doesn’t use progressive constructions. This is because the function of the progressive is to ‘recategorize’ a non-stative verb as stative. When you say I was writing my paper instead of I wrote my paper, what you are doing ...


9

The population of the world is increasing very fast. (Why it does not use 'increases'?) At first I didn't like my job, but I'm beginning to enjoy it now. (Why it does not use 'I begin'?) 3a. You can turn off the radio, I don't listen to it. 3b. You can turn off the radio, I'm not listening to it. Which sentence is correct? The ...


9

Have is one of the verbs that can be stative or active depending on their meaning. If I have a car or a house or a project, then I am trying to say that they belong to me, in which case have expresses possession and is stative. Here are examples of active meanings: having a shower means taking one, having breakfast means eating, having beer means drinking ...


9

We often prefer to use the present simple rather than the present continuous with verbs describing states such as “think”, “agree”, “hope”, “know”, “look”, etc. However, we can use the present continuous with some state verbs when we want to emphasize that a situation is temporary, for a period of time around the present. You’re thinking. This is ...


9

It means 'about to', but the point of the expression includes what John is doing now not just what he will do. John is engaged in 'picking up the phone activity'... ie he has gotten up from his chair, is walking to the phone, etc. This separates it from, "John will pick up the phone" which is purely in the future, and "John picked up the phone&...


8

Regarding The Joy of Not Being Married First, keep in mind that lots of books have titles like "The Joy of _" -- it is something of an idiom (from The Joy of Sex to The Joy of X (a book about math)...). Like most book titles, these titles aren't complete sentences: they're just stating the subject of the book, which in this case is "What Makes [Subject] ...


8

“How many years have you been studying English” assumes that you are studying English now, and have been studying English continuously for [???] years. “How many years have you studied English” assumes that at some time you studied English for [???] years. It leaves open the possibility that you studied English some time ago and are ...


8

How do I look? How am I looking? Both the sentences are grammatical. If you are asking about your appearance or the way you are doing something at the present time; at the time of speaking, you can use either, without any difference in meaning. However, the use of the presrnt simple is more common than the present continuous. Nevertheless, many people ...


8

Have in this case is an imperative, expressed with the same plain form as the infinitive: the singer is not saying that everybody is having a good time but calling on everybody to have a good time.


8

Remember: the main reason we use the present continuous is to show that something is happening at the present moment. Also we need to remember that some verbs are not used in the continuous tense. Some examples are verbs that show emotion (love, hate, prefer, etc.), measurement (measure, weight, etc.) senses (see, hear, smell, etc.), thought (know, ...


7

We would say, "how long have you lived there?" (present perfect; began in the past and continues) Or, "how long has your family lived there?" We might say "How many years have you lived here?" if the precise number of years were critically important, e.g., you are eligible for some benefit after living in a place for three years. But usually "how long" is ...


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