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31 votes
Accepted

I ___(to read) your book. It's fantastic. I'll finish it tonight

The verb read has two different pronunciations, its present simple form /riːd/ and its past simple form /red/. Neither tense belongs to the sample sentence a) I read your book [at the moment]. It's ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.4k
20 votes
Accepted

Is the present continuous idiomatic in "I'm liking to take it easy on the weekend"?

If you just started relaxing on your weekends and are enjoying it, you might say, "I'm liking taking it easy on the weekends". The only context in which you'd use this form is one where you'...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
19 votes

Why does the present continuous form of "mimic" become "mimicking"?

It's a standard spelling change. Verbs ending in c form their present particle as -cking. This helps the pronunciation, as c at the end of a word is normally "hard" (pronounced like k) but ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
18 votes

Why do native speakers sometimes use present continuous when it seems like it should be present simple?

The only one that sounds unidiomatic to me is "you're just having the right plan". That sounds more like how a speaker of Indian English would use the present continuous. But we would say &...
TimR on some device's user avatar
16 votes
Accepted

What grammar should I use to talk about an action I've been doing for a long time and will definitely keep doing?

Present continuous always carries the feeling of being temporary, and usually for a short time only. Present continuous is also commonly used with a few verbs that may take a very long time, like &...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
13 votes
Accepted

Why do native speakers sometimes use present continuous when it seems like it should be present simple?

As the Original Poster expected some of these are indeed mistakes. For example: It's really important to make sure that you're just having the right plan. We don't use the present continuous with ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
12 votes

Is the present continuous idiomatic in "I'm liking to take it easy on the weekend"?

From what you describe, I think most of the answers are not really conveying what you seek. I'd suggest instead: "I've been enjoying taking it easy on the weekend." which (at least around ...
Glen_b's user avatar
  • 514
11 votes
Accepted

Use of simple present and present continuous in subtitles for background sound

The effect is basically to distinguish a point in time from a span of time. A siren wails (once); an engine is revving (for some time). However, in practice, the real situations referred to can easily ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
9 votes

Why do native speakers sometimes use present continuous when it seems like it should be present simple?

Some of these are mistakes - people make mistakes all the time, especially when speaking or when writing in a careless way. Others are quite acceptable: You can still make progress if you're going to ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
7 votes

I ___(to read) your book. It's fantastic. I'll finish it tonight

If you've already read the book, then "I'll finish it tonight" makes no sense. This is why neither 2 ("read") nor 3 ("have read") can be the correct answer. Answer 4 can ...
Martha's user avatar
  • 5,521
7 votes

Is "it is looking good" slang?

The -ing form of verbs can be used to emphasize progress or that circumstances are changing in real time often with accompanying uncertainty, and that applies also to look, seem, and sound. In your ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
7 votes

In British English, can I use "be" in the past/present/future continuous tenses, like in "you are being selfish"?

The OP has obviously misunderstood something. It's nothing to do with British or American usage, or formal / informal contexts. The first three of these examples are all fine... 1: You are selfish 2: ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

I'm running on weekends or I run on the weekend?

The normal and neutral expression would be "I run on weekends" (or on the weekend). If you use "I'm running" you imply that it is particularly temporary, and you expect to stop. ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
6 votes

I ___(to read) your book. It's fantastic. I'll finish it tonight

To me, the sentence "I read [present tense] your book" makes it sound like you have an ongoing habit of reading the book, and you don't have any plans to quit that habit. In particular, it ...
Tanner Swett's user avatar
  • 5,950
6 votes

What grammar should I use to talk about an action I've been doing for a long time and will definitely keep doing?

'I'm wrestling' wouldn't sound right in most contexts because the present continuous makes it sound like you are actually taking part in the activity at that precise moment. But there are some ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
5 votes

Is the present continuous idiomatic in "I'm liking to take it easy on the weekend"?

No, that doesn't sound quite right. Since you want to convey the change, I might instead suggest: I'm liking 'taking it easy' on the weekend as an idiomatic way to say it: the phrase "taking it ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
5 votes

Why does the present continuous form of "mimic" become "mimicking"?

With many English words, the pronunciation of the letter 'c' is determined by with follows it. A 'c' preceded by a vowel and followed by an 'i' or an 'e' is almost always pronounced like an 's'. To ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 8,014
5 votes

Why does the present continuous form of "mimic" become "mimicking"?

The answer is about pronunciation, but it's not just about hard "c" vs soft "c". Many words double the final consonant before adding -ing, such as "bid" -> "...
Especially Lime's user avatar
5 votes

Is "it is looking good" slang?

Not slang. But a normal, fairly casual comment. These verbs (looking, seeming, etc) are not normally used in the continuous form, except to emphasise the temporary or progressive situation. (You may ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
4 votes

"I miss or I am missing" meaning I don't have it?

1: I'm [still] missing a few tapes I have found most of the previously-lost tapes, but a few haven't [yet] been found 2: I miss a few tapes I often think longingly of a few tapes that I no longer ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
4 votes

Why does the present continuous form of "mimic" become "mimicking"?

When forming derivative forms of words in English, pronunciation is almost always preserved and the spelling is modified if needed to indicate the correct pronunciation. In normal English spelling, a ‘...
Austin Hemmelgarn's user avatar
3 votes

Is the present continuous idiomatic in "I'm liking to take it easy on the weekend"?

Putting aside the question of whether it's grammatical, the problem here is not with the present continuous. Because you're using it, your audience will likely assume you plan to continue taking it ...
solublefish's user avatar
3 votes

Is "covered wagons rolling access the prairies" wrong?

This example is a sentence fragment, not a complete sentence. In particular it is a noun phrase, headed by the noun "wagons" modified by the adjective "covered" and the participle &...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
3 votes

In British English, can I use "be" in the past/present/future continuous tenses, like in "you are being selfish"?

Maybe I've been speaking BrE wrongly for the past 80 years, but IMHO "You are being selfish" carries no information as to the past quality of the person being accused. It could be an ...
Peter Jennings's user avatar
3 votes

Why is present perfect used here?

No. Arrive is a point event: it is very rare to use it in a continuous construction. In fact, the only ways in which I can think of that it might be used are either sarcastic: She's been arriving for ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
2 votes

Use of simple present and present continuous in subtitles for background sound

I have a folder containing several dozen movie subtitle files, so I just ran a case-insensitive search for the sequence phone ring (which picks up all variations, including Telephone rings, CELLPHONE ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

"Let me know how you <get on> <are getting on> at your new job."

In these contexts, to get on [well] means to be successful, content, whereas not getting on means failing (or otherwise being unhappy with one's circumstances).1 1: Let me know how you get on ...is ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

Where is the girl going or where the girl is going?

Word order in questions is different from word order in declarative statements. In a simple declarative statement, we say subject-verb-object, with "helping verbs" following the "is/are&...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
2 votes

Is the present continuous idiomatic in "I'm liking to take it easy on the weekend"?

No, "I'm liking to take it easy on the weekend," is not idiomatic English. A better to phrase it might be, "I like taking it easy on the weekend."
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
2 votes

Where do we use "IT" in sentence? For person we use he/she in singular

Assuming Tom is a male human and Niana is a female human, you must use the pronouns he and she to refer to them (or gender-neutral "singular they"). If they're dogs, "pet" fish, or ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar

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