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1

"yes, I have been redecorating" is a completely normal response. The context is provided by the comment so it is 100% obvious that you have been redecorating *the living room". The meaning of "I've been ..." is that a action that took some time (a continuous tense) but has effects in the present (a perfect tense). That fits this exactly.


1

I just went to Venice last September. The sentence above is grammatical. The speaker visited Venice in September, and has since returned home. I've just gone to Venice last September The sentence above is non-standard English; clearly “last September” is firmly rooted in the past, and in standard English the simple past tense, went, would be preferred. ...


-2

Both are grammatical and idiomatic, what you’re asking is a common question: What is the difference between have gone and went? Quite simply, the difference is to do with semantics: I have (just) gone to Venice last September - (one direction) - it suggests that a person has gone to Venice but has not returned yet to where they originally departed ...


1

Neither is correct! The usual question is either: Have you had breakfast (yet)? or Did you have breakfast - usually, but not necessarily, followed by a time reference - this morning? However, one uses the indefinite article before an adjective preceding breakfast Did you have a good/hearty/substantial breakfast this morning? Have you had a good ...


0

The simple past merely describes a past situation. So there's nothing complicated in the first sentence. You went to France every year in the past. The present perfect connects a past situation to the present in some way. In this case, the connection with the present is the potential for occurrence, or recurrence, of the situation at any time within the ...


-1

There is more than one use of the present perfect in English, but one use is exactly what you are talking about: to describe an action started in the past and completed just now or in the recent past. I have got the cookies out of the oven means that I just this instant finished the process of putting on oven mitts, opening the oven door, and pulling the ...


3

The rules in this case are simple. After I have done this has to be followed by something in the future, not a past or current action as in your first sentence. For example: After I have done that I will work in the garden. After I have done that I will rest for a while. After you have done that you should clean the car. After we have done that we ...


2

There is no significant difference in meaning between the four sentences. Before = on a previous occasion; earlier = at an earlier time (which might be earlier this week, this term or this year!) The choice of tense (studied or have studied) is not significant in this context either.


0

Well , Im going to explain grammatically When we use simple past we should mention an Exact time or priod not an unknown time ... But In Every-Day English we Sometimes use it for unknown times Therefore when a teacher says We're going to review what we studied , He probably means "What we studied in the last Sessions" In the second sentence "... We ...


1

The correct variant would be : I have done my homework which consisted of reviewing requirements, executing test cases and reporting defects. Your variants are incorrect, because you don't use "a" before plural ("defects"). Where is the wrong word for homework, the correct one could be "in which". The part "I had to" is correct, and "I have to" is not.


0

All three of your example sentences are perfectly idiomatic. A fourth option is: Did you solve the problem? The options can be written like this: Did you [manage to] solve the problem? Have you [solved]/[managed to solve] the problem? Perhaps you have just never heard "managed to solve" before, so it sounds unnatural to you. The next verb after ...


0

As far as I know, one uses the present perfect to emphasise actions that would otherwise be described in the simple present. According to the material given, the upgrading works are complete. This means that any description of the works will be in the past tense. When the material says “were using”, it is really just emphasizing that they “used chisels and ...


0

The expression 'is updated' can be understood in two ways: - passive (describes an action): undergoes (sporadically/regularly) an update process - perfect (describes a state): has undergone an update process i.e. is in the state of having undergone an update process In the reported speech, things being reported can remain in the present tense if they remain ...


1

"Prices are increasing" means that currently prices are increasing over time, there is a gradual change happening. "Prices increase" would mean that it is a characteristic of prices to increase, it is a general truth. "Prices have been increasing" means that it has been happening for a period of the time, from the past until this moment. "Prices have ...


1

Technically, the first sentence is a contradiction. It says first that you did experience the awful pain and then that no, you never have had it. That kind of construction is often used colloquially, though. The second sentence is grammatically and semantically acceptable. The phrase, "I had never experienced" means "as of the time under discussion," in ...


0

This question is very simple, as regards speech: I have never experienced such a pain before. [Ok,past, non-specific] or 1) I had never experienced such a pain before. [Ok in a specific conversation or context, like the one below. It presupposes a conversation where the simple past event is implied or mentioned. The event is not provided here by the OP.)...


0

If you say " I have never experienced a pain like that before", you are speaking from the present. You have never felt such a pain before in your life, before this present moment. If you use "I had never felt such a pain before" you are talking about the pain you felt yesterday, which is now the past and you had never felt such a pain before that past ...


1

Although I'm not a native speaker, here's my take: A) Yes, both can be used. If you choose Present Perfect, you're talking about an experience you had in your life - that's it. If you choose Past Perfect, you're also talking about an experience in your life, but with a specific moment in time (in the past). B) No, Present Perfect can't be used in this case,...


2

After correcting minor syntax errors, the meaning OP intends is something like... Now, let's use the formula above so that [+we can] achieve the further results ...but he wants to express this in a "fancier" (more formal) way. In which context it's worth noting that "imperative" let's is a relatively informal construction in the above. Possible ...


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