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I had/have saved up for months to afford it

1) is fine, Yesterday, I bought a new laptop. I had saved up for months to afford it. 2) is not. You don't follow a simple past with a present perfect in those two related things. Use the simple past ...
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes

I had/have saved up for months to afford it

People might say it as in your second version, but it’s not standard grammar. The saving up that is relevant is that which created the conditions (of sufficiency of resources) that were already ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
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Are you coming to see the movie?

The idiomatic choice for most dialects of English is B: No. I have already seen it. Option A, "I already saw it" is common but sounds like an Americanism to my British English ears. BrEng ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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"Advances in the past have inspired expectations that have not been met."

Compare John has made pies that have not been eaten. John made pies that were not eaten. The use of the present perfect indicates that the events are still relevant to the present: probably the ...
Stuart F's user avatar
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What is the difference between the usage of present perfect and past simple in "It's not that I did, but I have" in this context

The passage that you quote is a bit confusingly presented IMHO, but the relevant bits are this: […] more information needs to be given with [the simple past], such as when the action took place. and ...
ruakh's user avatar
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2 votes
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Team A played/has played well

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO SAY? Do you want to specify OR not? Here the game is definitely over. Team A played well, but they lost because we have better players and better tactics. Here, the past is ...
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes

Has been vs has gone vs went

Without context, either might be correct Your suggestions are mostly right but also slightly wrong. “Been” and “gone” are past participles of the verbs “be” and “go” so the emphasis is different. The ...
Dale M's user avatar
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Are you coming to see the movie?

As far as speech goes, you are safe to use either A or B. I would stay away from C when talking with people. The past perfect is used primarily when telling a story. The most correct answer is A. ...
ethan lamb's user avatar
6 votes
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Are you coming to see the movie?

The grammar is correct in all three, but the meaning is probably best expressed with a present perfect. Your reply is giving the reason why you don't want to see the movie now. That is a clear ...
James K's user avatar
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Which tense is correct? (simple past / present perfect / past perfect)

Simple past is fully correct - Mr. Kim was busy for two weeks last month. Past perfect is correct, but some may argue that there should be two action verbs when past perfect tense is used. Also if ...
James Mathai's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Using present tense with dates

You are attempting to use the "historic present". This is acceptable, but "marked". It isn't the normal way of expression in English and may sound odd. The effect is one of an ...
James K's user avatar
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a mistake in the book or a deficiency?

No, there is neither a mistake nor a deficiency in the book. The passage you quote is pointing out that the perfect tense can be used for both things that are finishing now and for things that are ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
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a mistake in the book or a deficiency?

If we are about to clean a room, preparing to clean a room, a room that has not been cleaned in a long time, we can say "This room has not been cleaned in a long time." And even while we are ...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote

In general, most male adults have acted/acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. - are both acceptable when talking about a general idea?

In general, most male adults have acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. In general, most male adults acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. These are both acceptable ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
0 votes

He hasn’t worked for years?

To summarise the comments: It could be either, the statement doesn't contain enough information to clearly say. Surrounding context would give the information.
Hmwat's user avatar
  • 158
1 vote

In general, most male adults have acted/acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. - are both acceptable when talking about a general idea?

In general, most male adults acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. This sentence sounds better to me, because when you say "at a certain point in their lives" you are saying ...
Matt Molina's user avatar

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