New answers tagged

0 votes

rule about using present perfect with present simple

Yes. That's correct. Present perfect is a present tense. The topic is something that happened in the past or began in the past, but it is always indirectly talking about the present. Your first ...
user avatar
  • 13.8k
0 votes
Accepted

present perfect have forgotten/ forgot

While 1. is grammatically correct, it's not idiomatic. That's to say, English speakers don't usually talk like that. Much more likely is: It's night(time) (or "dark") already and I haven't (...
user avatar
  • 24.1k
0 votes

What is the best choice in this case, present perfect simple or continuous?

I hope it has not been taking too much of your spare time. Implies the activity is still taking time at present. I hope it has not taken too much of your spare time. The activity is over and we ...
user avatar
  • 35.4k
0 votes

"It hasn't get updated yet" or "It has not gotten any updates yet" or "It hasn't got updated"?

There are several possibilities, but not all of the suggestions in the question are natural, or even grammatically valid. It hasn't get updated yet. This has the wrong tense for the verb "to ...
user avatar
  • 32.4k
0 votes

"to have been to" and "to have gone to". Which should I use?

Both of I have been to London three times. I have gone to London three times. are grammatically correct, ans both seem quite natural to me, although I believe that the version with "been" ...
user avatar
  • 32.4k
0 votes

"to have been to" and "to have gone to". Which should I use?

"have been" and "have gone" in your context actually have the same meaning and are both perfectly fine. "I have been skiing three times" is correct. Alternative (similar ...
user avatar
  • 5,597
0 votes

I want you to finish/to have finished

Both are fine, but as many have mentioned in the comments, "within" is best used. If not you can use present perfect tense proposed by @RonaldSole: I want/I'd like you to finish it within ...
user avatar
  • 5,597
1 vote

I have eaten / had eaten / ate seaweed when I was in Thailand three years ago

Actually, I have eaten seaweed when I was in Thailand three years ago is not at all idiomatic. Your 1b I ate seaweed when I was in Thailand three years ago is idiomatic and probably how a native ...
user avatar
  • 27.2k
1 vote
Accepted

What is the difference between present perfect and present perfect continuous in this example

The difference between the tenses in your examples is not so obvious because of the final phrase "all of my life", which specifies a time period. So, you could use either of these in this ...
user avatar
  • 2,042
0 votes

What is the difference between present perfect and present perfect continuous in this example

When we talk about someone's biography and life, either of the two tenses can be used without noticeable change in the meaning. for instance: I've worked in this field since I was 19. I've been ...
user avatar
  • 63
0 votes
Accepted

"I have known her since I lived there" vs "I have known her since I have lived there"

Where T is a moment in past time, "since T" means from T to the present. A clause in the perfect tense refers to some state of affairs which started in the past and continues to the present, ...
user avatar
  • 440
1 vote
Accepted

I haven't waited vs I haven't been waiting

It's funny, I just gave this explanation to another user. You're problem isn't English. Your problem is that you failed to give the answer expected by the book. There are many grammatically correct ...
user avatar
  • 3,203

Top 50 recent answers are included