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2

In all cases, the first verb is conjugated according to the subject. An atheist believes in God. To form a negative sentence we use the helper verb to do (in the negative form) and use the bare infinitive form of the main verb. The first verb, to do, is still conjugated. Note that because the word "do" ends in a vowel, when we conjugate it by ...


4

An atheist is a person. The pronoun for a person is either "he" or "she" and sometimes the singular "they" is used when we do not know the gender of a person. In this case, gender is irrelevant, the verb that follows the singular subject must always be in the 3rd person singular. The correct answer is in the 3rd person ...


3

"An atheist" would be 'he' or 'she'. All singular nouns have the third-person-singular "believes" when they are the subject (though there is a little flexibility when a singular noun refers to a group of things). And all plural nouns have third-person-plural. However, atheists are people who don't believe in any god!


0

In reality, you should expect to hear simply "We don't have Wi-Fi." If the choice is really limited to the terms of the Question, with no other clues to the context, then "We didn't install…" would be much more likely. Even then, "We didn't install…" as a simple statement of what happened might well be explained by the fact that ...


1

Wi-Fi isn't something that you "install". It is not a physical object or software. Options (for an on going scenario): We don't enable the Wi-Fi (If you have a router, but disabled the Wi-Fi and only use network cables.) We don't have a router, we just use mobile data. We don't have a network(/an Internet) connection for the house, we ... etc.


2

My first choice would be, “We haven’t installed wi-fi.” “We didn’t install wi-fi,” or “We don’t have wi-fi,” would also work. (Installing Wi-Fi in the past would be necessary to have it in the present.) In this context, “We don’t install wi-fi in our offices,” or, “The Amish don’t install electronics in their homes,” would mean they never do.


38

I wouldn't even use the verb "install": We don't have Wi-Fi in our home.


1

I probably wouldn't choose the simple past tense, because that usually implies that the event happened at a particular time. The present perfect is usually a better option when the time is unspecified: "We haven't installed wi-fi in our home." (Because Colin Fine brought up the issue, I'll mention that I'm a native American English speaker.) I ...


34

I (British English speaker) would always use the "present perfect": We haven't installed. I believe many AmE speakers could say We didn't install (but I'm not an expert). If you want to indicate that you have no intention of installing WiFi, then either We're not installing or We won't install. We don't install doesn't make much sense, unless you ...


0

In a hypothetical construction you would use the "second conditional" The snow would melt if the air temperature was above 32F. This means that you think it is unlikely that the temperature will be above 32F. The use of the past tense in this context doesn't relate to events in the past.


1

Yes. We usually use the present simple to talk about things that are always or generally true or claimed: The world is round. Dogs chase cats. You probably don’t want to use “the” to introduce snow if you are talking about snow in general.


1

He wore a beard for his whole (adult) life. Past tense for past facts. He had worn a beard for his whole adult life Past perfect is also possible, to set up the contrast with the action of shaving yesterday. He has shaved it off. Present perfect for present state (resulting from past actions) He shaved it off yesterday. Past tense for past actions.


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