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How to pronounce " bored " before "watching"?

Most people usually say: /bɔɹd/ as the general american prounciation in the wiktionary here I do not see any reason to pronounce it without the "d" at the end, no matter the use in a ...
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How many tones in English?

Unlike many other languages, English does not have tones or follow this tonal rule. They are used for semantic meaning (whether a sentence overall is a question or a statement, for example, or the ...
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How do we read and pronounce the "X" which are commonly seen in collaborations in advertising?

We could pronounce it as 'cross'. cross could mean the following. cross verb (MIX) [ T ] If you cross a plant or animal with another of a different type, you cause them to breed together in order to ...
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How do we read and pronounce the "X" which are commonly seen in collaborations in advertising?

No, you can just say: The north face and / X Timberland "with" is also useable, but "cross" and "times" are not really showing how there is a collaboration between the ...
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maybe vs. may be

A native English speaker would often know the difference between "may be" and "maybe" based on the context. However it would hardly be something they consider in everyday ...
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-ng sound in idiosyncratic

It is not uncommon in English for the letter N to represent the sound [ŋ] before a [k] sound, but this is subject to some variation. When both sounds occur together in the same syllable, the sequence [...
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-ng sound in idiosyncratic

I hear [ŋ] in the British. The presence of the velar consonant /k/ will tend to affect the /n/ that precedes it causing it to become [ŋ] or a blend [nŋ]. This is similar to how a biblical consonant ...
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maybe vs. may be

The only way to differentiate these two, if spoken fast, is to check the grammar of the sentence. E.g. Are you going somewhere? Maybe. I may be going somewhere. Here "I maybe going somewhere&...
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"This one is a question, too" vs "This one is a question. Too"

They both have the same meaning, but the second sentence places more emphasis on the "too" by using a full stop to separate the sentence. This emphasis is also supported by a longer pause ...
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Why are Pakistani and Virginia pronounced Packistani and Virginea not /peɪkəˈstanē/ and /vərˈjaɪnyə

There are no rules for pronunciations, only guidelines. Pakistani isn't /peɪkəˈstanē/ because it is /ˌpæ.kɪˈstɑː.ni/ or /ˌpɑː.kɪˈstɑː.ni/. (with some dialect and individual variation) There can be ...
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Is spondee itself a spondee?

Taken from the list of entries indexed by OneLook, the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language shows a primary stress on the first syllable of "spondee" and a minor stress on ...
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Is spondee itself a spondee?

The wikitionary says spondee is pronounced as the following /spɔnˈdeː/ The ' refers to the syllable after that being stressed, so "dee" is stressed in "spondee".
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Pronunciation of "null"

/I don't hear /nʊl/ I hear something like /nɜl/ even approaching /nɛl/ This is the "California vowel shift, a chain of vowel movements that is occurring among native speakers of English on the ...
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Pronunciation of "null"

Best is to follow the below pronunciation: /nuhl/ Below is the UK transcription for "null": Modern IPA: /nə́l/ Traditional IPA: /nʌl/ 1 syllable: /"NUL"/ In Faroese, it is ...
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