63 votes
Accepted

"The Jesus who said" - why is there a definite article before the proper name "Jesus"?

When a person has said many things over the course of their life, those statements may not always be perfectly consonant with one another. Using the definite article the is an acknowledgement of that ...
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49 votes
Accepted

Why is Zika capitalized and chikungunya and yellow fever are not?

"chikungunya" and "yellow" are, respectively, a common Makonde word meaning "something bending up", and a color name. Therefore, neither is capitalized. However, "Zika" is a proper noun, named after ...
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  • 576
41 votes

"No more Hiroshima" or "No more Hiroshimas"

The latter is correct. If the meaning is essentially There should or must never be any additional uses of nuclear bombs on cities or against people, as occurred in Hiroshima (and in Nagasaki) in ...
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  • 9,881
31 votes

Why is Zika capitalized and chikungunya and yellow fever are not?

Capitalization is stylistic choice, and people may choose to capitalize things that you don't normally see capitalized. There are a couple of guidelines that come up in a simple search, and this is ...
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  • 7,357
29 votes
Accepted

(The) Putin's ratings shot up. Is the definite article allowed here?

You should not use the in The war campaign has shot up Putin's ratings. Yes, the noun "ratings" is definite, but it already has a word that indicates whose ratings they are: Putin's ratings. You ...
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  • 36.1k
26 votes
Accepted

"I and John" vs. "John and myself" vs. "John and I" -- Which is the acceptable way to refer to myself and my friend?

"I" is correct. The speaker is the subject of the sentence, the one performing the action, and so you use the subject version of the pronoun. You use "me" when the speaker is the object, the person ...
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  • 57.1k
26 votes
Accepted

No more Hiroshimas - Can proper nouns be plural form?

Sure they can. In English it's pretty common to use an iconic (or notorious) proper noun to refer to similar events/places/people. So, one might easily say: Let's prevent there from being any more ...
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  • 25.2k
25 votes

"No more Hiroshima" or "No more Hiroshimas"

Both will be correct, depending upon the context in which you want to use them. If you are referring to the CITY in particular, then it will be "No more Hiroshima". However, if you are referring the ...
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25 votes

Why is "science" in "Bachelor of Science" singular, whereas "arts" in "Bachelor of Arts" is plural?

The short answer is that the words "art/arts" and "science/sciences" are used differently in various idiomatic ways. Both "art" and "science" can be considered ...
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  • 72.3k
23 votes

"No more Hiroshima" or "No more Hiroshimas"

No More Hiroshima is what almost happened in WW-2. No More Hiroshimas is what we say to indicate that we don't want that to happen again. At best, the former sounds like a clumsy attempt at the latter....
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21 votes
Accepted

Why is "science" in "Bachelor of Science" singular, whereas "arts" in "Bachelor of Arts" is plural?

Overview The central issue of question is the countable and uncountable usages of the words science and art. Explanation Following are two common usages of science: (uncountable): All activity that ...
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  • 1,691
21 votes

Why is "science" in "Bachelor of Science" singular, whereas "arts" in "Bachelor of Arts" is plural?

The other answers have pointed to the distinction between art and arts in Modern English, a polysemous word borrowed from Latin via French. There is a historical dimension to this, which I think is a ...
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  • 311
15 votes

Using THE before some countries

The naming of countries is a matter of politics and convention rather than grammar. It is no longer appropriate to say the Ukraine, for example, as the government of that country deprecates it, and ...
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  • 17.5k
15 votes

"The Jesus who said" - why is there a definite article before the proper name "Jesus"?

There are several cases where proper nouns can take "the" with some examples here. In English, you use the article THE with proper nouns: to emphasize the uniqueness of that entity: e....
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  • 251
12 votes
Accepted

Question about "the" before names

No. If there is a definite article in the title, you say it as part of the title: Today, I would like to discuss The Bridge on the River Kwai with you. However, if there isn't, you don't need to ...
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  • 5,315
12 votes

“I like the USA” or “I like USA”?

You must say: I like the USA. which is short for: I like the United States of America. There is no rule here. The reason that "the" is required is because it's part of the name of the ...
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  • 27.3k
12 votes

Is there any rule for shortening of names of people?

To summarize, there are no hard and fast rules, but there certainly are patterns that can guide us now and then. Each language naturally has its own patterns, so to my mind this is a legitimate ...
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  • 7,236
11 votes

Why are 'proper nouns' of body enzymes and things the like not capitalized?

They're not capitalized because they're not proper nouns. A proper noun is one that is used to refer to a unique entity; "arginine" is used to refer to any sample of that particular chemical. It's no ...
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11 votes
Accepted

What do you call the place where you tie a horse?

Merriam-Webster calls this a hitchrack a fixed horizontal rail to which a horse or team can be fastened to prevent straying Sometimes also called a hitching rail Please see Every equestrian needs ...
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  • 13.4k
10 votes

Capitalizing family members' names (i.e. nouns, NOT proper nouns)

Your daughter's textbook is not quite accurate. You capitalize such nouns when they act as names, as the ordinary form of address. "Mommy" is used that way in your second example. But in your ...
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10 votes

"The Jesus who said" - why is there a definite article before the proper name "Jesus"?

Your supposition is correct. The use of the definite article is a rhetorical device to indicate that what is being said is the truth because truth is necessarily unique whereas error is manifold. ...
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  • 26.3k
9 votes
Accepted

Why are some common nouns' first letters being used capital?

You are right: Meadow Hall is the proper name of a house or mansion described in the book, and that is why the words are capitalized. Note also that there is no article before "Meadow Hall": we don'...
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  • 36.1k
9 votes
Accepted

Definite article with "9/11"

We do not use an article before "9/11". Americans would think the use of "the" in the sentence you quote as decidedly strange-sounding. 9/11 is a date. We do not use an article before a date when ...
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  • 57.1k
9 votes
Accepted

Articles before modified proper nouns

It would not be strictly incorrect to drop the articles, however written with the articles, it is a bit like saying "a version of Hermione that is interested" and "a version of Ron who is thoroughly ...
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  • 1,937
8 votes

Why is Zika capitalized and chikungunya and yellow fever are not?

The Zika virus is named for the Zika Forest in Uganda. Given that Zika is a proper noun, it is capitalized.
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  • 81
8 votes

Is ‘THE Ukraine' grammatical?

It's not ungrammatical, it's just outdated. Historically there were certain countries that were usually referred to using a definite article. For example, "the Ukraine", "the Sudan"...
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  • 9,903
7 votes
Accepted

India Prime Minister Vs. Indian Prime Minister Vs. India's Prime Minister

Your thinking is largely valid. "He is India prime minister" is wrong. The noun is "minister", so normally any other words that modify the meaning should be adjectives, like "Indian", and not another ...
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  • 57.1k
7 votes
Accepted

before we get to yuppie -- why no article in front of "yuppie"?

Martian: Why was that goal disallowed? Cookie Monster: The striker was offsides when the ball was kicked to him. Martian: What is "offsides"? [or What does "offsides" mean?] Cookie Monster: I will ...
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7 votes

Articles with the days of the week: "Is it a Monday today?"

We say "a Monday" (or whatever day of the week) when we want to say that the event in question will occur on an unspecified Monday. For example, if you said, "The next meeting of the Zetetic Society ...
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  • 57.1k
7 votes

Articles before modified proper nouns

If Hermione is skeptical under the present circumstances: Harry headed to the trophy room accompanied by a skeptical Hermione. The indefinite article implies, or at least it leaves open the ...
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