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67

He is saying that you don't owe him thanks, he owes you thanks. He clearly regards you as the sort of student who makes teaching rewarding. He may even imply that he has learned from you, from the sorts of questions you have asked which made him think about things which he took for granted.


16

The first requires the pitch on sons to remain level, while the second requires it to fall. Additionally, there is a pause after sons in the second. The reason is that, in the second, He had four sons is a viable sentence on its own, and the nonrestrictive relative clause merely adds additional information. In the first, the restrictive relative clause is an ...


10

Sentences Imagine a long piece of writing. If you look at the grammar, you will see that everything is organised into 'chunks'. So if we look at the very, very small chunks, we have different parts of words that have different meanings. Look at this word: replayed We can break this word into three bits. We have re which means again. We have play. And we ...


7

I love you. "It's me who loves you." This would be said in the context where you're contrasting with someone else: "He likes you, but I love you!" I love you. You're emphasizing the fact that it's love, rather than anything else. This is also the emphasis you would use if you want to emphasize the whole sentence. For example: "I'm moving to South ...


5

If you have only one month, and your goal is improving this only for the mentioned exam, and assuming that all other aspects of your English speech are adequately good, there are a few quick fixes that I can think of. Method 1: Enunciate (which is to pronounce every word clearly) and exaggerate (which is to overstress the words you'd normally stress, well, ...


3

To put it simply, verbal emphasis is the way of stretching a particular word or changing a pitch or volume in the sentence to emphasize it. Emphasizing a proper word may change the meaning of the sentence (download from the link). I love you - It's me who loves you; nobody else does that I love you - it's not just friendship or simply caring. I love ...


3

Just like in everyday speeches, where you can speak the same thing differently to convey different subtle meanings, you can read in in many different ways. But to focus about pausing, there are a few rules of thumb I would like to suggest: pause at every end of sentence pause at every punctuation mark pause at the beginning of a clause pause it the same way ...


3

I would rather suggest you to 'imitate' If you go by the book, you have to study and practice too. Intonation is the later part of syllable stress, which talks about the smallest units of sound in a word. Which is way harder learning until you get here. Imitating the native speakers is the easiest way of learning an accent and this is exactly the way you ...


2

Intonation is all about how we speak. The flow of our sentence. Native speakers of English in different parts of the world intonate in different ways and their pronunciation is also different for some words. Ex- American and British pronunciation, even in Britian there are different pronunciation. I work in an international call centre in India and I met a ...


2

I am a native English speaker, and this is my answer. Like you said, intonation is when your voice goes higher in pitch on a certain word. You seem to understand what intonation is already, so there's no point in explaining it. Even though speaking out loud with other native speakers will help your intonation, there isn't always someone to practice with. ...


2

Here, emphasis is being used to put things straight, to banish confusion. The thing emphasized is more important than the thing not emphasized, in a relationship of duality, or perhaps polarity. To illustrate: I love you, not her, she just wants your money. Emphasis on the person who loves. I love you, I don't just like you, darling I love you. Emphasis on ...


1

The first sentence is stating that 'he' has four sons who became doctors. This says that the four sons that 'he' has became doctors. In the second sentence, the main independent clause says that 'he' has four sons. After the comma, the dependent clause is adding addition information, which could be ignored if wanted, while the 'who became doctors' in the ...


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