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44 votes
Accepted

"There is a lot " vs. "There are lot"

Unless the second is a typo, then neither are correct. "There is a lot of" and "There are a lot of" are both legitimate terms, depending on whether the noun is countable or not. For example: ...
mike's user avatar
  • 9,853
44 votes
Accepted

In the sentence "She says she has no friends," the number of friends is zero, why is "friends" still plural?

It's just that the normal expectation is she would have several friends. We use the singular in contexts like He has no wife, or I have no car. We tend to use "do-support" or "got-...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
42 votes

In the sentence "She says she has no friends," the number of friends is zero, why is "friends" still plural?

The rule is not "two or more". The rule is "not equal to one". Zero takes a plural verb. "Zero books are on the shelf", NOT "Zero books is on the shelf." ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.7k
31 votes

Which of no, none, any, some would fit in "few of the students knew ___ of the answers"?

I agree that any is the best option here. (You should always remember when taking a multiple-choice test that there may be more than one valid answer, or even no really good answer; you should choose ...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 21.1k
18 votes

Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

Sentence (a) is awkward. Sentence (b) is colloquial. In (a) the word "hardly" would be more concise than "almost don't": My sons hardly talk to each other. In (b) you could replace ...
Old Brixtonian's user avatar
13 votes

Should I say "There are (a) very few animals there" with an article or not?

Short answer If people expect that there are a large number of animals there, and you know that there are some animals, although not very many, then you could say: There are a very few animals there. ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

Is proof a quantifiable word?

Yes, proof can be quantifiable. One obvious context is the realm of mathematics, where there may be more than one proof of a theorem. So, for example, one could say: There aren't many proofs for ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
10 votes

Which one ("most of it" or "all of it") is correct in the given context?

The following statement is correct: My teacher said that all of it was correct, with only one exception. If you wish to use "most of it", then the sentence is better framed along the lines of: ...
Phylyp's user avatar
  • 1,827
9 votes

Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

I would easily understand a., but it's not natural. To capture that meaning, you could say, "My sons practically don't talk to each other" or "My sons pretty much don't talk to each ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
7 votes

Does "How much time" mean the same as "How long time"?

Your lecturer is better than you think: How much time do we need for such an experiment? How long will it take to complete such an experiment?
Mick's user avatar
  • 6,526
7 votes

Which of no, none, any, some would fit in "few of the students knew ___ of the answers"?

The word "few" is weird. The phrase "a few" means there definitely were some, but "few" by itself implicitly means "Not more than a few". In some cases, putting ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
7 votes

In the sentence "She says she has no friends," the number of friends is zero, why is "friends" still plural?

In English we use the basic form of a noun for a count of exactly one, and the plural form for every other number. It's hard to say why that is - that's just the rule in English. The rules are ...
bdsl's user avatar
  • 523
6 votes
Accepted

"How many...." vs. "How much fish"

Both "many" and "much" can be used, depending on context. This is because "fish" can be countable or uncountable, depending on the definition in use. Refer to these definitions (from Oxford ...
LMS's user avatar
  • 5,562
5 votes
Accepted

How do you use the word "minuscule" in a sentence?

Minuscule is an adjective, not a noun. Your sentence should be "This apple is minuscule and I don’t want to buy it". However, minuscule may not be the right word, depending on the context and what ...
Jake's user avatar
  • 439
5 votes

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in words?

one hundred quintillion a hundred quintillion This is the list of numbers (truncated): ... 1,000,000: a million 1,000,000,000: a billion 1,000,000,000,000: a trillion 1,000,000,000,000,000: a ...
EKons's user avatar
  • 180
5 votes
Accepted

Is "I have no much time." correct?

No, it is not correct. "no much" is never correct, instead use "not much." That is not much time. Not much later, he left. When using 'not', in general move the negative to before the verb: ...
JeremyDouglass's user avatar
5 votes

I'm unsure if the use of "a lot of" in this sentence is correct

I would agree that What’s more, we can listen to music, play video games, and do a lot more things, easier than... " is better and clearer than is the same sentence without the "do". ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
5 votes
Accepted

The usage of "little" versus "a little"

I don't think it's accurate to say that "little" is the negative, the opposite, of "a little". It's more like a milder form. "I felt little confusion." I felt some ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.7k
5 votes

Rank quantifiers based on intensity

You are acting like a lawyer or mathematician, but natural languages aren't like mathematical expressions or legal terms. "very" is a general intensifier. "fairly" would tend to ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
5 votes

sings here only on Saturdays

Sentence 1 No, He sings here only on Saturdays means that if he is singing here, it must be Saturday. In other words, he never sings on other days of the week. It doesn't tell us anything about how ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Does "How much time" mean the same as "How long time"?

"How much time" and "how long" can be used in place of one another in many common situations. In the situation you describe, both would sound natural and be correct grammar. "How long time" is always ...
leoger's user avatar
  • 790
4 votes
Accepted

Why "hundreds and hundreds" instead of just "hundreds"?

From Cambridge English Dictionary: "If and is used to ​join two words that are the same, it makes ​their ​meaning ​stronger". I have been waiting for hours and hours We laughed and laughed! ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
4 votes

Can I say 'that many'?

It is important to be able to distinguish between countable and uncountable nouns. We say how many [countable noun], and how much of an [uncountable noun]. Examples: How many apples are in the ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
4 votes
Accepted

Difference between "not any" and "no any"

No any is ungrammatical, you can use no or not any.There is no difference in meaning between There is/are no + noun and There isn’t/aren’t any + noun: There was no reason to be afraid of her. (or ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 7,105
4 votes
Accepted

"Every" vs "each" usage

At the end of every day you will be required to write a review. At the end of each day you will be required to write a review. Which one sounds better considering that this action will repeat ...
Davyd's user avatar
  • 1,726
4 votes
Accepted

What is the part of speech of quantifiers? Adjective or determiner?

There is no universal convention on the parts of speech in English, except perhaps that linguists dislike the term part of speech (they prefer terms like lexical category or word class). Consider the ...
choster's user avatar
  • 17.7k
4 votes
Accepted

What is left after "most" is taken from something: "some" or "very small number"?

most is an indeterminate amount , but means "more than half" of a group or set, the number leftover can be hinted at by using various descriptors In order of decreasing amounts leftover, it can be ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
4 votes

all most vs almost

"All" and "most" are two different words that can be used individually to represent quantity/extent, they cannot be combined. "Almost" is a different word that is used as a modifier to "all", to ...
Phylyp's user avatar
  • 1,827
4 votes
Accepted

Which then most sought where most might not be found,

I think the two incidences of "most" have different meanings. Here's how I see it (but I don't have much experience reading Shakespeare, so this might not be right): the first "most" means primarily; ...
aparente001's user avatar
  • 1,742

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