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Does "Is it not legal?" mean the same as "Is it illegal?"?

But then, several native speakers told me that even adding “not” right before the verb (= after the subject) does not make it a genuine question. It is an expression of surprise, like it might be a ...
fatalerrer's user avatar
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Confirming negatives in English

The picture [is not] correct, right? As there's negation in the sentence, we say No, it isn't correct. Edit I would probably not say *Right, it is not correct. although listeners will likely ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
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Does "Is it not legal?" mean the same as "Is it illegal?"?

The version with not can connote some surprise on the part of the speaker upon learning that it was false. Is it not true? Is it false? Speakers might use the first version, "Is it not true?&...
TimR's user avatar
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4 votes

Does "Is it not legal?" mean the same as "Is it illegal?"?

Don't confuse grammar with normal usage: Question: Is he uncertain? (I want to know if he is uncertain (= isn't certain) = a genuine negative question = I'm trying to gain information, I have no idea ...
Lambie's user avatar
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4 votes

They don't have the book? Don't they have the book?

The statement spoken as a question "They don't have the book?" would mark that this is strongly counter to expectations. -- I went to the bookstore and but they don't have the book. -- They ...
James K's user avatar
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2 votes

You don't like it? (usual word order) Don't you like it? (question word order)

A question can be asked in the form of a statement (I assume that's what you mean by 'the usual word order'). The speaker's tone of voice indicates that it is intended as a question. In your two ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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1 vote

(Do) You really want it?

Questions in English can come from a rising tone at the end of the sentence. You want to ↗︎go? You saw him ↗︎yesterday? ↗︎= rising intonation Apart from all things wannas, dunnos, coulda, woulda, ...
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes

(Do) You really want it?

I think there are two phenomena at work here. One is simply that you can ask a question simply by giving a declarative sentence a question mark and a questioning tone of voice. "It's six o' clock?...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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2 votes
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What does 'Why' mean in this case

It's an interjection expressing surprise or warning. Like "Oh" or "Zounds" or many others.
Jay's user avatar
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Can I combine first person, second person, and third person in a sentence?

Certainly, as long as you are referring to different people. "I am by the door, you are at the window, and he is near the desk." No problem, makes perfect sense. We're talking about three ...
Jay's user avatar
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Can I combine first person, second person, and third person in a sentence?

Yes, you can combine them all, but you'd need a specific context for the sentence to make sense. By the way, your example only uses first and second person. 'We' is a first person pronoun, as with ...
Xighteous's user avatar
16 votes
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Is it correct to say "What, my family and friends would say, is ...?" instead of "What would my family and friends say is ...?"?

(1) and (2) are both correct, but do not have the same meaning. (This may already be obvious, but for the sake of completeness or for future readers). Consider: (1) "What would Socrates say is a ...
Kaia's user avatar
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3 votes

Is it correct to say "What, my family and friends would say, is ...?" instead of "What would my family and friends say is ...?"?

Yes, there is often opportunity to rearrange words and phrases. It doesn't always mean it's a good idea, style-wise, but there are options. There are some problems with your proposed versions, but ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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3 votes

"Is monarchy relevant in the modern world or should it be abolished?"— Is it correct not to invert the word order and say "or it should be abolished"?

This sentence has an afterthought, and that it is non-integral to the main clause can be indicated with the em-dash: Is monarchy relevant in the modern world — or should it be abolished? It could ...
TimR's user avatar
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2 votes

Is an indignant or surprised question a rhetoric question?

Can it be that ...? could indeed be a rhetorical question in context. The other side of the aisle have not offered an alternative. Can it be they have no real plan to solve the crisis, and merely ...
TimR's user avatar
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4 votes

Is an indignant or surprised question a rhetoric question?

A rhetorical question is inserted intentionally to prove a point, the answer of which is obvious, e.g., "Do you really believe Novalny died of natural causes?" There is no element of ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
2 votes

Is an indignant or surprised question a rhetoric question?

There is no grammar of rhetorical questions. The question "Is it a cat?" might be a rhetorical question, or it might not. It depends entirely on the intent of the speaker To give an example:...
James K's user avatar
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0 votes

“Can I not read it”?

"Do I have to read it?" That's natural and unambiguous.
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
1 vote
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"How much are you offering "? "What is your offer"?

What is your offer? This sentence can be said to anyone who is offering a deal or contract. In terms of buying/selling a house, this would almost always be the buyer, not the seller. (So the seller ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar

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