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1

Yes you can. But one of these would be better: Where did they go? To a bar. or Where did they go to? A bar. But you can omit or double up to without any loss of meaning.


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If there is an auxiliary verb, you always invert: I must go. → Must I go? I will be. → Will I be? I should say it. → Should I say it? I can swim. → Can I swim? I am leaving. → Am I leaving? I have done it. → Have I done it? The same happens with the verb "to be" even when it's not apparently auxiliary (although some linguists consider "...


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To ask why it was naive is to indicate that you are asking about a past situation. For instance, why an Englishman on the Grand Tour would think that. To ask why it is is to indicate you are asking about the current situation. If, indeed, you wanted to ask why it was in the past and still is now, you would have to use both.


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This expression is an example of colloquial omission, which is quite informal. The complete sentence would be "Is anything new?". Out of "What's new?" and "Anything new?", both are OK but the former is more widely used and is, in my opinion, the better choice. "What's new?" is an open question, so the person can say ...


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I would like to add that 'any' has a separate use where it applies the meaning 'it does not matter which/where/what', it can be any of it/anywhere/anything/anyone. For instance: With this season ticket you can take any buses. Therefore I have the feeling that the question may try to point out that within a specific group any individual is allowed to speak ...


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I'd like to add a little nuance to your question about nuance. Nuance in spoken English is often achieved differently from the way it is done in the written form. And in general, I reckon the latter is more difficult, and takes more skill and practice, and that is made more of a challenge these days because people seem more inclined to write as they think it ...


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Anything new? is a complete sentence and not an idiom. It has to be taken in context though, because the subject "something" is not specific. However the topic of the question may also not be specific. Therefore the context is often dictated but the location as opposed to a conversation. If you arrive at your desk and ask your assistant if there is ...


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It is pretty clear what you are asking. There are really two sentences here "When are you free?" is the question, and "You can say any day except Tuesday." is a clarification to the question. You've then reduced the second sentence and merged it with the first. It is the sort of thing that is common enough in casual speech, or even in ...


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In a question, you use the auxiliary does when the wh- word is NOT the subject of the verb or does not modify the subject: What does he want? [what is the direct object of want] What song does he like singing? [what modifies the direct object of like singing] If what is the subject, there cannot be subject-auxiliary inversion, because being an ...


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Welcome to ELL! "Does" can be used for emphasis, but it isn't necessary here. If someone tells you, "You don't help people," you might contradict them and say, "I DO help people". Or if you are asked, "What helps people?" you might say, "I don't know. What DOES help people?" But most of the time we simply say ...


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