124

It's: one hundred quintillion or: a hundred quintillion The words for very large numbers If you're wondering how to form other huge numbers like this, here's the pattern: A thousand thousands is a million: 1,000,000. A thousand millions is a billion: 1,000,000,000. A thousand billions is a trillion: 1,000,000,000,000. A thousand trillions is a ...


91

I am a native speaker with a careful ear. From my experience, I can tell you that when the millennium turned from 19xx to 20xx, we said "two thousand" plus the remainder throughout the aughts (01, 02, ..., 09). To use the "twenty" construction would have required acknowledging the zero digit: "twenty oh-eight, twenty-oh-nine" or "twenty-aught-seven" etc. ...


78

Admittedly, I'm answering a BrE question as an American, but your source is suspect. 9.36 twenty-four minutes to ten This is grammatical, but nobody in their right mind would actually say it. Who's got the time to calculate 60 minus 36 to come up with this version? You'd just say "Nine thirty-six". (If the time is close to a round value, it's ...


62

This sentence as it stands is incorrect. You say either of these: A $2,000 item. (A two-thousand-dollar item.) $2,000 worth of items. (Two-thousand dollars worth of items.) In the first case, you're talking about a single item that is worth $2,000, so you use "a" and you don't say "worth of". In this case, "dollar" is a descriptive adjective the ...


59

I work as an engineer, and we talk about margins of error quite a bit. We all refer to it as plus minus one. Seems the wikipedia article also calls it the plus-minus sign Example: Q: "Hey what's the length of this side?" A: "The drawing says it's fifteen millimeters, plus minus point five." (15 ± 0.5mm) Edit: For regional/dialect ...


56

You typically don't spell out shorthand or acronyms for units of measurement, especially if the shorthand is not easily pronounceable. In this case, say "gigabytes". Colloquially, native speakers may also say "gigs".


56

2x4 would be said: "Two by Four" https://www.thespruce.com/dimensional-lumber-definition-1821735


54

Basic Answer Generally, in English, you may pronounce the plus-minus sign (±) by saying "plus or minus". Generally, you should not say "plus minus". You do not need to know other details. Detailed Answer Specific Contexts In some places, you may find that others say simply "plus minus". In other places, those who work with you ...


44

Historical accident. First derives from the same root as fore, before, in the superlative grade—it meant, originally, “fore-est”, that is ‘foremost’. Second derives from Latin secundus, originally a participial form of sequor meaning ‘following’ All the others derive from a common Proto-Indo-European ending -tos, ...


44

To add to bhundven's excellent and correct answer, the word "by" is spoken in English in other contexts when the "x" is written. For instance, you may hear of a 6x6 maze ("six by six maze"), or a 4x4 magic square ("four by four magic square"), or a room measuring 12 feet x 10 feet ("twelve feet by ten feet"). (There's also a class of sport utility vehicle ...


42

I believe the symbol is known as a tilde https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilde The Punctuation Guide is a good source of information for English punctuation and its usage, including what each symbol is called (though in this case it doesn't mention the tilde). Typing the actual symbol into Google or Wikipedia also yields an accurate result. [edit] If ...


38

Your indicated keys, plus the three above and to the right of your indicated keys and the shifted version of the top row all generate "punctuation" characters. Keyboard keys are generally referred to by the default character they represent (rather than any shifted alternatives). The ones you've specifically marked are... ; is the Semi-Colon Key ' is the ...


36

Symbols should always be pronounced to denote their intended meaning. For example, the ampersand symbol (&) means "and", and so is pronounced that way: eg "Smith & Jones" would be read as "Smith and Jones". You would not expect someone to pronounce the symbol as "ampersand" when encountering it in a text. The "slash" symbols (/ and \) are ...


35

Wikipedia lists large scale numbers here. As only the 10x with x= multiples of 3 get their own names, you read 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 as 100 * 1018, so this is 100 quintillion in American and British English and 100 trillion in most (non-English speaking) other places. (Practical approach: The different naming patterns for large numbers obviously ...


35

52 is "five squared". 53 is "five cubed". 54 is "five to the power of four", "five to the power four", "five to the fourth power", "five to the fourth", or "five to the four". From the comments, it seems some English speakers are unfamiliar with the shorter "to the four" way of ...


32

@Catija's answer is very close and covers the major points, but slightly wrong. Which is the correct way here? A two-thousand dollar/dollars worth of items. Neither. You're treating 'worth' as the subject of your sentence and acting like it's countable, but it's not. 'Worth' is treated in English as a single abstract quality, like '...


29

Either of the ways that you show, but if you are spelling them as they are said, this is consistent: "zero point one percent" (written 0.1%) "one thousandth". (written 1/1000 or 0.001) You can also say "one part per thousand" (1 PPT).


28

The single tick following a variable is often (but not always) used to represent a derivative and (in the United States) is always pronounced "prime." In your example, "Ex prime = ex plus tee." f(x) = x² <--- "Eff of ex equals ex squared." f′(x) = 2 x <---- "Eff prime of ex equals two ex." f′′(x) = 2 <---- "Eff ...


28

Yes, it should be read as "Nineteen-oh-six".


27

It would normally be read aloud as: f of x equals x squared There are some variations you might hear. For example, sometimes is is used in place of equals. If the exponent was 3, you would say cubed. Anything higher than three (say, for example, 5) would generally be read aloud as: f of x is x to the fifth (power) or perhaps: f of x is x to the ...


26

With very new terms like this, there little established use, and a lot of variation between speakers. As far as I can tell, this was the one-thousand-two-hundred-seventy-third mRNA substance that was tested, so reading as number "one thousand...three" is arguably "correct" But that is "a mouthful", so most speakers will reduce ...


25

In general, for some number of hours, plus some fraction of an hour, you'd use the number, plus the fraction, plus "hours", plural. "Four and a half hours.", "Three and three-quarters hours," etc. However, for the specific case of 1.5 hours, the usual expression is "an hour and a half". This usage is so common that "One and a half hours" actually sounds ...


25

If you want a term similar to percent, but ten times smaller, it's per mille, denoted by ‰ sign. So, 0.1%=1‰.


24

Here's how I'd say the first one: The absolute value of S minus the sum from 1 to n of f of t sub i times delta sub i is less than epsilon. Key: (1) The absolute value of (2) S minus (3) the sum from 1 to n of (4) f of t sub i (5) times delta sub i (6) is less than epsilon Note: Some mathematical expressions can be read aloud in more than one way. For ...


24

You have several options: one point five one and a half one and one-half - can seem wordy. one and five-tenths - mathematically correct term, not used regularly. These are all correct. The hyphens in the last two are optional to some degree depending on the source. Including it is arguably more correct. one and half is not correct... usually. Based on ...


24

People say it as "plus minus" all the time. (I'm a native speaker of AmEng, math guy). The other answers that say this is a bit informal and sometimes can lead to ambiguity are correct, but it is very common. If you're in a job interview you should include the "or", but if you're chatting with people "plus minus" is fine.


23

With units of measurement like that, you write them without any plural marker, but say them with the plural marker Examples: 64GB → Sixty-four gigabytes 1GB → One gigabyte 30km → Thirty kilometers 1L → One liter 2L → Two liters As for saying 'Gee Bee' instead of gigabytes, that's harder to answer, and ...


23

How you say it depends on the context. If it comes up in a discussion of mathematics you would say "three over twenty-one". Since you asked while you're thinking about fractions that's the answer. In everyday speech, that or "three twenty-firsts" would do. (I wonder where it might come up in everyday speech.) Of course 3/21 = 1/7, so &...


22

It is an upper case Sigma, from the Greek alphabet. It is almost always used to denote a summation: and is therefore (technically) called a summation symbol, as others pointed out in the comments.


22

In English, I have never heard "plus minus one" used to refer to the ± symbol; it would be confused with: x + -1 which could be spoken as "X plus minus one" and have a different meaning than x ± 1.


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