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17 votes
Accepted

Sentence started with Verb+ing, but it's a really different structure

Facing the square is the Palazzo Marchesale This is equivalent to: The Palazzo Marchesale is facing the square The reason the author inverted it is so they could more easily attach the relative ...
StephenS's user avatar
  • 8,139
9 votes
Accepted

Two multiple choice test about reduced adjective (relative) clause and meaning

The man seated beside the host is the guest. Seated is an adjective meaning on a chair. Seating comes from the verb to seat, meaning to provide chairs to people (NOT to sit, which means to put ...
Kman3's user avatar
  • 2,807
8 votes

Sentence started with Verb+ing, but it's a really different structure

The Palazzo faces the square (its front forms all or part of one of the four sides). The second phrase explains what the palace is, the third explains who the family are.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

'who' or 'whom'?

Please vote for the member [who you believe [ ___ has done the most for our village]]. The element in outer brackets is the relative clause modifying "member". Within the relative clause is ...
BillJ's user avatar
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4 votes

What is the grammatical function of "knowing" in the sentence "he's grown up knowing your name."?

This is not a 'reduced' form. Knowing here acts here in its participial capacity, not gerundial, so the phrase/clause knowing your name acts as an adjectival. Syntactically it is a 'secondary ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes

usage of 'having been + past participle'

Is it okay to use 'Having been+third form' as the reduction of Passive Relative Clause in Simple Past Tense in order to put more emphasis? In a word, no—because BE having been VERBPaPpl is not ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes

Difference between these 2 reduced clauses

Consider: The bench looked good after painted. No The bench looked good after it was painted. Yes The bench looked good after being painted. Yes The past participle alone (here, painted) ...
TimR's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

"All the organizations involved have sent ...." sentence structure problem

You present the following example sentence from the Longmans dictionary definition of the verb appeal. All the organizations involved have sent urgent appeals to the government, asking for extra ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Nuance of infinitive phrase `to stand watch` in the sentence

The first form is more ambiguous in meaning. It could mean: You are not the only guardian who has ever stood watch over Middle-earth. or: You are not the only guardian currently standing ...
J.R.'s user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Does "the man who is eating is my dad" = "the eating man is my dad"?

It would be better to say The man eating is my dad. instead of The eating man is my dad. The first example is merely an elision of implied syntactical elements. Expanded it would be: The ...
Robusto's user avatar
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3 votes

Is the verb use in this sentence correct?

When finished with digging out ancient objects, archaeologists must interpret what they have found. There is no passive in that sentence. When finished with digging out ancient objects is an ...
Lambie's user avatar
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3 votes
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REDUCTIVE RELATIVE CLAUSES

The word "reductive" shouldn't be substituted for "reduced", because it has a different meaning in English. When a relative clause is "reduced" to an adjective phrase ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Sinks and baths have faucets (that are) attached to them

Sinks and baths have faucets attached to them. Sinks and baths have faucets that are attached to them. Both are fine, but the original (without "that are") reads better. (Note: Although ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 23.1k
2 votes

Reduced relative clause extraposition

Both of your sentences are grammatical, and they both seem to describe the same construction; but they don't mean quite the same thing. ... each element ... is shown separately and is attached ... ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Reducing the verb at the beginning of a sentence// dictionary form

It seems you are confused over how to use the "being" adverbial phrase. This often is at the beginning of a sentence in order to describe the reason for something else in the sentence. Being the ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
2 votes

Should 'to be' be involved or it's optional?

It's an example of a reduced defining relative clause. ...and there were signs of a sensory equipment, served in part through the wiry cilia of the head, involving factors alien to any other ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
2 votes

Should 'to be' be involved or it's optional?

It's a participle adjective clause or reduced defining relative clause. Let's have a look on your sentence: "there were signs of a sensory equipment, served in part through the wiry cilia of the ...
Cardinal's user avatar
  • 6,025
2 votes

What is the grammatical function of "knowing" in the sentence "he's grown up knowing your name."?

He's grown up [knowing your name]. No, it's not a reduced form. You specifically asked what the grammatical function of "knowing" is. The simple answer is that its function is head, more ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
2 votes

Is "I don't like girls smoking" a correct sentence?

1) "I don't like girls smoking." seems like "I don't like it when girls smoke." which is slightly different. Instead, you could say "I don't like smokers", if it's enough in the context. 2) First of ...
Pantera Onca's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

that + past participle usage

In your example, generated is not being used as a participle but as the simple past of generate in the active voice. It would totally subvert the intended meaning to insert is, an insertion that would ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
  • 32.1k
2 votes

that + past participle usage

generated is not a participle: it's an ordinary past form. that is a relativizer, equivalent to which. Some condition generated the signal. This function performs some action appropriate to the ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Different ways to shorten the sentences

No, in the cases above, it is not a case of reducing a relative clause. A relative clause is also called an adjective clause because it specifically modifies a noun. In the example, The man who ...
Drazex's user avatar
  • 639
2 votes

Reduction of adjective clauses

(1) Do you know [the woman who is talking to Tom]? (2) Do you know [the woman talking to Tom]? The contrast between (1) and (2) has nothing to do with ‘reduction’, but that of different kinds of ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
2 votes
Accepted

Omitting "which is"

Your mistake is in assuming there are two adjacent nouns. Rather, "four blocks" is, here, not a noun-phrase but part of the adjective-phrase "four blocks away". One could also more deeply analyse ...
Darael's user avatar
  • 1,021
2 votes

Omitting "while"

The point of misplaced modifiers is that they make the parsing of the sentence ambiguous. You say that the participles modify the subjects of the sentences ("I and she"), but the problem is that those ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
2 votes

While + Past Participle

It's grammatical—but it's confusing. Stylistically, a better phrasing would be: To perform this pose, they rested on their legs, which were positioned wide apart, as if they were straddling an ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
2 votes

I have a bug eating plant vs I have a plant eating bugs

I have a plant eating bugs would normally be taken to imply that the plant is actually eating bugs at the moment, rather than that it was a plant which does eats bugs. I think this is because if you ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
2 votes
Accepted

"She was first female president to be elected in 1919."

They do mean the same thing, however, the first is much more idiomatic. What they mean is that, of all of the female presidents elected in 2019, she was the first. One other thing I'll mention is ...
Chris Mack's user avatar
  • 5,848
2 votes

When can we reduce a relative clause?

I don't know where that site got the idea that "a sentence cannot be reduced because the relative clause ... modifies an object of the verb ..." As you say, this is nonsense. I gave a book written ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
2 votes

Is there any major difference the comma makes in: "I bought a pen[,] looking good"

Beginning with your third example, the sentence structure has the SVO structure. SVO stands for Subject + Verb + Object. This is a very common sentence structure in English. Subject = "I" Verb = "...
Benjamin Godfrey's user avatar

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