24

In British English, veggie means vegetarian (at least according to the Collins Dictionary). It can also be an adjective which is used to talk about food that doesn't contain any meat or fish: Going veggie can be tasty, easy and healthy too. Veg is an informal British word which means a vegetable or vegetables: I like both fruit and veg. In American English ...


21

Veggie is informal and casual and vegetable is standard English. You would use veggie in relaxed speech or writing and vegetable in more formal writing.


19

It is very casual and informal. When in doubt, I recommend that you do not use it. It is quite different from Italian or Spanish, where subject pronouns can be left out; in English (and other Germanic languages), it is unusual. I would interpret it as follows: You are in a hurry or working on an awkward keyboard; Or this text is not important; Or you are ...


14

Carefully avoiding terminal prepositions has been, for at least a generation, a dead letter. There are doubtless people my age who still practice it; but nobody except a few cranks think it a defensible ‘rule’. It survives in public consciousness largely because dogmatic ‘descriptivists’ enjoy using it as a stick to whack ‘prescriptivism’. There are, to be ...


14

muggy is an informal term that refers to the discomfort of humidity. Synonyms would be stifling, airless, oppressive, sticky, clammy. humid is, or at least can be, a neutral term that refers to moisture in the air. For example, the air in the Pacific Northwest is quite humid, but people who live there do not feel it to be muggy.


12

Ain’t is a negative present-tense form of the verbs be and have employed in all persons and numbers: I ain't we ain't you ain't you ain't he/she/it ain't they ain't It represents a coalescence of the ordinary spoken contractions of not and the three relevant forms of the two verbs: am not ⊲ a’n’t ) are not ⊲ a’n’t ) is ...


12

"Gonna" is an informal contraction of "going to". It's used in informal speech. While informal writing is, well, informal (and thus the rules are loosely defined), I've never seen "gonna" in writing, except in SMSspeak. And, of course, in written dialogues in novels/etc. So, while there's nothing stopping you from using it wherever you want, I suggest you ...


12

Gonna is informal; you can use it in written English, but it is not normally used in business English.


11

You would not normally use the term "carry a pregnancy" in everyday English. It is very common to hear the phrase "to carry a child" or "to carry child". The example you cited appears to be a technical definition that uses the more formal medical language "to carry a pregnancy", but again you would generally not use this phrase in everyday writing or speech. ...


11

Godspeed is an archaic way of saying goodbye, and is used in modern English in situations where very great earnestness is not inappropriate, such as a very dangerous mission, for example, where lives are at risk. It means "May God speed you", that is, may God give you success. It is a wish for a safe, successful outcome. P.S. If the situation is not at all ...


10

This crops up rather frequently because some people will compose a letter similar to the way we might give an answer over the phone, particularly when we are in a hurry. While I'm proofreading my email, I'll often notice I've done this – but it was generally inadvertent, and I usually change it, and add the subject, after I've noticed I've done it. As ...


10

The term "to fix" is a synonym for "to repair". Your example "to fix [an] error in [a] theorem proof" would be completely understood, though it is slightly more common to hear "to correct an error in a theorem proof". The word "fix" does not imply that something is unchanged. EDIT: As others have rightly pointed out, there is a sense of "to fix" that ...


9

There are two phenomena in play in your examples. They are sometimes indistinguishable from each other: Was re-installing a workstation in a conference room; Discussed a quarterly report with X; Am on an expo in Chicago; The first phenomenon is that of very informal speak, omitting the word subject I (and sometimes even the verb, as in my last ...


9

Formally, yes - it is correct. Down can be used as a preposition, such that: Down can be used to indicate movement from a higher to a lower position They went down the mountain Or at a lower or further level or position on, in, or along: He ran down the street She is down the other end of the line. Down is defined as a preposition in a number ...


9

I'm a native speaker of English, and bunch of people does not sound wrong to me, nor do I suspect, to most native speakers (academics excluded; see below). The Corpus of Contemporary American English reports it used about a fifth as often as "group of people", which is certainly somewhat promising as far as it being "correct". But I can't really say whether ...


9

(I address only your first question here; I hope you will break the second out to another post.) SHORT ANSWER: Restrict your use of terms like somewhere and anywhere and everywhere to the colloquial register, and avoid them in the formal register. LONG ANSWER: With regard to somewhere: the some part of this collocation never has the sense “a few&...


9

In daily conversation you would say poop or poo in American English. Excrement is used when talking about feces (the AmE spelling) being disgusting and filthy. Feces is usually used to describe it in a more clinical or studied way, as to a doctor or scientist. We also say that a baby has a dirty/soiled diaper. You could also simply say that a baby is ...


8

There is no difference in meaning although there are a few differences in usages. Here, there is virtually no difference: You are flying to Belgium tomorrow. You're flying to Belgium tomorrow. However, there are places where the two are not interchangeable. For example, this particular contraction cannot be used at the end of a sentence, or as a ...


8

1) Lest the delicate porcelain of my loneliness crack This is the best of your suggestions, in my opinion. I think it is phrased quite nicely, and shows the metaphor clearly. 2) Lest my delicate loneliness porcelain crack This one is confusing because of the order of loneliness and porcelain. As mentioned in a comment, switching the order makes it ...


8

You are correct, there can be ambiguity in the meanings. fix is usually used to mean correct, whereas fixed is used to mean immobilize. In usage, usually additional context is usually supplied to avoid confusion, also an understanding of possible scenarios is necessary to properly understand some sentences, the entire sentence has to be read before ...


7

AFAIK most Americans know the British equivalents for their words, and vice versa. Some people even use them (some Britons use the American words). It wouldn't be considered weird - an American would just assume you were British, or learnt British English. It wouldn't be considered unwelcome either, by the vast majority of Americans.


7

Oxford English Dictionary has an entry for it: lite, adj.2 and n.6 Comm. Designating a manufactured product that is lighter (in weight, calorie content, etc.) than the ordinary variety, esp. (with capital initial) low-calorie beer. Freq. used postpositively. 1962 L. S. Sasieni Princ. & Pract. Optical Dispensing i. 17 On light-weight ...


7

Definitely Informal Lite is a very incorrect and informal form of 'light', and it is used only in advertisement and branding. Not sure about this, but it was most probably used by food companies first, saying that their product had less fat compared to other products.


7

Those phrases are examples of ellipsis: the omission of words that can be understood from the context, or given contextual clues. While ellipsis is not normally used in formal English, it is more used in spoken English, or informal English.


7

It is well is an old-fashioned and quite formal phrase meaning approximately it is worthy of approval, so It is not well means “You shouldn’t do that” or “That’s a bad idea”, but considerably politer. Well was for many centuries used regularly as a predicate adjective in a number of senses, some of which last to this day,...


7

'Yes' can be considered the baseline - I can't think of any context in which using it would be inappropriate. (It might come across as slightly over-formal on some occasions, but more likely no-one would pay attention to it) Any official/formal speech will most likely use 'yes', as will almost all written usage. 'Yeah' is an informal equivalent to 'yes'. In ...


7

It is part of an educated (university-level) vocabulary, and can be used as a segue in a meeting, when the topic is going to change abruptly. [Let's assume we've been talking about sales in the Euro Zone up to this point] Apropos the Pacific Rim, we've appointed Cookie Monster head of emerging markets.


7

In science, humidity is the amount of water vapour present in air. When talking about the the way the air feels, "humid" means "wet", and sometimes, in casual usage, warm as well. Muggy (about the air) always means "wet and warm". Humid Muggy


6

"Occident" and "occidental" are more dated than sophisticated. The term usually used nowadays is "western". "Occident(al)" might still be used appropriately in certain technical literature (anthropology?), or in the name of a publication or place, where it originated probably no later than the early 1900s.


6

Ending sentences with prepositions is controversial to some. This rule was taken from Latin, and that is probably the rule that you were taught. However, imposing rules of Latin grammar on English usage is nonsense. Sometimes it is correct to end a sentence with a preposition, but not always. You should avoid usage such as "Where are you at?" because "at" ...


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