1 vote

Adverb relative clause or nominal relative clause?

It never snows [where I live]. Yes: it's a 'fused' relative construction (your nominal relative) in which "where" is a preposition, thus where I live is a preposition phrase. It has a ...
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1 vote

Adverb relative clause or nominal relative clause?

The sentence is fine as is. “Where I live” is an adverbial clause. It modifies the verb “snows” and answers the question “where”. I wouldn’t call it a “relative” clause, though.
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1 vote
Accepted

Getting rid of non-restrictive clause in the end of a sentence

It is quite clear without the comma. It means it overrides both properties. I don't understand what you think is being stressed by inserting a comma. I know that the pause that the comma implies ...
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  • 147k
1 vote
Accepted

Shortening multiple relative clauses

To be honest, you do not really need "living with him", as "my husband takes care of our children" is sufficient information to see that the children live with him. So it should be ...
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  • 3,054
1 vote

Grammar of relative clause

They both are. The difference is in how the writer (the "me") currently experiences that gift: The book which my mother gave me last summer is interesting This means that the book is ...
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  • 1,477

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