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If I am reading the intent of the sentence correctly, I would not put that comma between reason and that. I would put one between him and so and drop the that between so and he, but you don't necessarily have to. Paying no regards to stylistic choice, you could use: She gave him a reason. A reason that was sufficient to burst a passion inside him, so he ...


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1) You are correct, one should not use "when I'll manage to" in this construction. Remember that "I'll" is a contraction of "I will" (Or, rarely, of "I shall") and "will" here would be unneeded. 2) if the 2nd clause were independent and could stand on its own, a comma would be normal, but it is not. If you considered "when I manage to afford its price" to ...


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Both of those sentences would be grammatical (and make sense) if you used hyphenation, indicating an adjectival use: The by-you-searched implication of the word is as follows... The searched-by-you implication of the word is as follows... That would make the essential component of each be: The implication of the word is as follows . . . The ...


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It is possible to restructure these sentences using the past participle as an adjective modifier, but your examples are not grammatical. If you want to use the past participle as an adjective, you should remove all prepositional modifiers, and generally simplify. Examples: The dog (which) you found has black spots → The found dog has black spots. ...


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People will buy the classics based on her recommendation but sales won't reach the kind of numbers [achieved in the first book club]. The bracketed element does modify "kind of numbers", but it is a past-participial clause, not a relative one. It has a similar meaning to the relative clause which were achieved in the first book club, but I'd avoid ...


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People will buy the classics based on her recommendation but sales won't reach the kind of numbers (which is) achieved in the first book club. It is perfectly reasonable to say that "which is" is omitted in the sentence.¹ Some linguists call this 'whiz-deletion' or 'relative-clause reduction'. However, the modern reference grammar, The Cambridge Grammar ...


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The books [available for borrowing in this library] do not interest us. No, the bracketed element is not a reduced relative clause; in fact it's not a clause at all but an adjective phrase modifying "books". It can be converted to a relative clause by the addition of "that are", as in: The books [that are available for borrowing in this library] do not ...


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I agree with your feeling about the word "that" in this sentence. It is definitely not a sentence an English speaker would use. Also, the word "experience" can cause some difficulty, as some of the comments indicate. I would recommend the following sentence instead: Describe an occurrence (or occasion) in which you went out with your friends and had a ...


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There are two men by the gate who keep a watch on it. It's perfectly OK. The PP "by the gate" modifies "men" and hence is part of the nominal serving as antecedent for "who". Note that it is also possible for a relative clause to occur in postposed position, at the end of the clause containing its antecedent: I met a man the other day who says he knows ...


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The sentence is perfectly fine. There is no rule or convention that says pronouns must come immediately after the noun they represent. There doesn't even need to be a referenced noun at all: Who is keeping a watch on the gate? The pronoun can go anywhere at all so long, so long as it is syntactically sound: There are two men at the gate, wearing long ...


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Yes, you may say Thus, we reject the null hypothesis that these variables are independent. A hypothesis is a type of statement so we can dispense with "stating" or "that states" as redundant.


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This is a very subtle point. Most native speakers, including myself, would use "that" in this context. If I try and defend your lecturer's opinion, you could think of "the point" as a place. In that case, precise language would dictate that you use "where." Overall I disagree with your lecturer, though. I don't know if they are always interchangeable, but ...


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