9

I would not refer to X as applicant. That is X' role vis-à-vis the people you are writing to, not a role in which you know X. Instead, I would replace he at every third or fourth opportunity with X' name, particularly if I were eager for X to succeed in his application. Keep in mind that you are dealing with a correspondent who is probably dealing with ...


8

I believe you could equally well say, "This organ contains three kinds of cell groups." "Of cells" modifies "group" in the same way "of horses" modifies "lovers", and you can equally say "cell groups/groups of cells" as you can say "horse lovers/lovers of horses".


8

Generally, if you use a noun/pronoun in a compound sentence, you don't need to mention it again unless the noun in subject changes. I would call it grammatically correct to say: He read a book but didn't understand it. and He read a book and discussed it with his friends. Since there is a coordinating conjunction between the two sentences, leaving ...


7

Yup - those prepositions are redundant. The short answer is that you're right and should follow oerkelens's advice. Background in case you're curious: One of the grammar rules that is drilled into the heads of many native speakers of American English in grade school is along the lines of: "IF YOU END A SENTENCE WITH A PREPOSITION, THE WORLD WILL EXPLODE ...


5

The verb is omitted to avoid repetition. Here's what you'd say if you included it: I'll meet you in the city--that is, I'll meet you in the city if the trains are running. Most people feel that such a repetition is clumsy and unnecessary. You couldn't just say: I'll meet you in the city--that is, I'll meet if the trains are running. because meet ...


5

This is a complex situation which will tax even fairly sophisticated native-speaker writers. There are four techniques which can help you: Don't let phoney 'style' considerations prevent you from repeating terms. Employ uncontracted structural devices—repeated prepositions, for instance, or frank either ... or constructions—to make the 'shape' ...


5

Help can be used for both questions and projects. We're a tight-knit group of students, lecturers and professionals who help each other with statistics questions and projects.


4

Special considerations for 'null' aside, to answer your larger English question, the answer is that you don't need a second is. Think of similar constructs: The car is red and broken down. This column is an example of Ionic architecture and made of pure marble. The joke is a very long one, but funny. In all three cases, we could add another is: The car ...


4

No, nothing wrong --- that's English for you. But you can use stylistic maneuvers to reduce the tiring "of" repetition. "Determination of colors of this set of palettes" could be rephrased "Color determination for this palette set", where I've turned two "of" constructions into the compound nouns "color determination" and "palette set", and changed an "of" ...


4

From Cambridge English Dictionary: "If and is used to ​join two words that are the same, it makes ​their ​meaning ​stronger". I have been waiting for hours and hours We laughed and laughed! The noise grew louder and louder. There were hundreds and hundreds of wellwishers. It can also suggest a progression in time - the sound is getting ...


4

To summarize the comments I had made under the question, the use of an elliptical construction for list items can be ambiguous. Had I not read this question, I would not have interpreted the following phrase as elliptical:  involuntary commitment, drugging, and ECT treatments Instead, I would have considered involuntary as applying only to the first ...


3

One of the main properties of auxiliary verbs is that they can exhibit code (show code). What this means is that we can use just the auxiliary verb to represent the whole of the rest of the verb phrase. The listener must be able to tell what this missing information is. Usually it has already been talked about, but it might be clear from the physical ...


3

It's normal and it sounds fine to repeat I three times in a sentence like that. The word I is tiny, so it doesn't make your sentence seem long. Repeating I makes your sentence easier to follow than altered versions of the sentence where I is not repeated. The purpose of pronouns is to avoid repeating longer words. The pronouns themselves are very short: I, ...


3

You may repeat will or not; both are grammatical. Will may be taken to 'distribute' over both infinitives, just as the subject does over both verb constructions. The initial the, however, should be omitted. In English the definite article would be used only if a specific instance of vandalism were spoken of, and it appears from this source that this is not ...


3

I would select 'is null' for both English and SQL reasons. The alternatives are different in nature. I.e., primary key is singular ('a' primary key), but the null attribute is a mass noun. Having 'is' in front of both alternatives helps to highlight this difference. Additionally, in SQL the syntax used to query a null column is (eg:) WHERE column_value *...


3

When you have a compound sentence where both parts have the same subject, it is common to omit the subject from the second part (and later, if there are more than two parts). But it is not required. I laughed and I cried. I laughed and cried. Both are correct. We USUALLY leave out the subject on the second part. It is sometimes included for emphasis or ...


3

Instead of having a multiple co-ordination of entire noun phrases, the Original Poster could just use a co-ordination of modifiers with a single head noun: UI design principles focus on improving the quality of user interface design. These principles include the Structure, Simplicity, Visibility, Tolerance, Feedback, and Reusability principles.


3

If you don't care for the repetition, try Animations and movies are much harder than documentaries to dub. or Animations and movies are much harder to dub than documentaries. or (if you're very fussy) Animations and movies are much harder to dub than documentaries are.


2

When a recommendation letter uses "the applicant" it sounds cold and remote. There is no warmth or good feeling, and it sounds like you are trying to distance yourself from him by being so formal. If you are writing a recommendation letter, this is probably the exact opposite of what you are trying to convey.


2

I would say yes, I've seen many letters with the applicant being used, however one of the reasons it is sometimes avoided is because the letter then becomes a bit too generic, and less unique.


2

First at all, when I decide to do some work, I don't worry because I know my father is behind me You can try this: First of all, there's no worry for me in setting out to do some work, since I know that my father is behind me. First of all, I have no worry when setting out to do some work, because my father is behind me. You can use different "non-...


2

The repeated to is needed to make clear that go faster is parallel with perform jumps. That is, the repeated to guides the reader to parse the sentence like this: To enable the car or to perform jumps between blocks to go faster rather than like this: To enable the car to perform jumps or go faster That is, the repeated to establishes that there are ...


2

You can just omit "for example" altogether. If you start the sentence by referring to the previous example, it's immediately clear that you're talking about an example, not a universal case. In the previous example, an HTML element containing ``Search Results" can be used as an anchor.


2

This sort of repetition is grammatically unexceptionable; more importantly, it is a very common rhetorical device to give a series of parallel predicates extra impulse toward the end and prevent them from falling drearily off. You have to read it with your ears and not just your eyes.


2

I'd do it this way... UI design principles focus on improving the quality of user interface design. The list of some of the principles -- Structure Simplicity Visibility Tolerance Feedback Reusability OR The principles of - Structure Simplicity Visibility Tolerance Feedback Reusability


2

My my is, according to Cambridge dictionary, a variation of my oh my. They are both interjections expressing surprise, pleasure, admiration, even sarcasm... Oxford English Dictionary says that my (not repeated) is used vocatively in exclamatory phrases, as my eye!, my God!, my gracious!, my oath!, my stars!, my word!, etc and that it, and oh, my!, is ...


2

"They" is optional in this instance and is up to personal preference. However, I would reword the sentence like this: None of these things are beneficial and they do not help her. Note that in the above sentence, "they" should be used, as None of these things do not help her is incorrect (double negative).


2

for is not the best preposition to use in every phrase here. I would write: Kudos to Peter for his volunteering at Sunday school, during both Jan and Feb.


2

In the UK, the term the naughty step- the bottom step of the stairs- is often used. This term is much easier to use in conversation. You can say that a child is on the naughty step, off the naughty step, you can tell a child to go to the naughty step or to get off the naughty step. This document uses the term "time in" for the state of not being in time out,...


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