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51 votes
Accepted

Can we say or write : "No, it'sn't"?

An acceptable, if somewhat archaic, contraction would be 'tisn't https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%27tisn%27t
GranBurguesa's user avatar
49 votes

What to answer to "you're too kind"?

"You're too kind" is not meant to be taken literally. It is a hyperbole. Read literally, the person is saying "I do not deserve the amount of kindness you display to me." As an ...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 21.1k
25 votes

What to answer to "you're too kind"?

"You're too kind", as already mentioned, is hyperbole. They're simply complementing you for being kind and it's basically an alternative to or extension of "thank you". Most of the ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
20 votes

Is it OK to respond to "thanks" with "sure"?

It depends on the person you are speaking to and the way you say it. I don't think sure is a common way to respond to thanks, because it's potentially ambiguous. It could be interpreted as a shortened ...
Micah Windsor's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

What are some polite ways to respond to the people who call your name but you don't know them

There are many ways to handle this situation, more than I could list. As with any language, if you are good with words you can think of new, clever expressions. Some common examples: Hi, I feel ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
15 votes
Accepted

Is "Don't be" correct as a response to "I am sorry"?

It's correct. It's a command telling the person who is sorry not to be sorry, generally because the speaker believes that person has nothing to be sorry for (in other words, the speaker believes that ...
Ryan M's user avatar
  • 1,793
14 votes

Can we say or write : "No, it'sn't"?

You are asking if it is acceptable to write: No, it'sn't The answer is: no, it is not acceptable. A contraction is normally (and traditionally) of two words, not three. So when you intend to say "...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
10 votes

Is it OK to respond to "thanks" with "sure"?

in which situations it would be OK, and what exactly would it imply? It would be okay in the USA. If you said it in the UK, it would imply that you are using American English. As has been said in ...
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

a short answer on a question "Could you wait for a moment?"

Here 'Could' is the beginning of a polite request phrased as a question, not a real question. An appropriate answer might be "Yes", "OK", "All right", "Sure", ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
7 votes

What to answer to "you're too kind"?

"You're too kind". is just a way to thank someone by saying they are kind. It's what we call a "set phrase". You can say whatever you want in response. It has nothing to do with ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.3k
7 votes

What to answer to "you're too kind"?

One thing nobody has mentioned is that potentially no verbal response at all is warranted but just non-verbal one, like a smile, eye contact and nod while passing by. The sequence of events was that ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
6 votes

What are some polite ways to respond to the people who call your name but you don't know them

As Andrew mentioned, there's lots of ways to handle this, but one thing to keep in mind is the slight nuances in phrasing between some options. If you just really don't recognize the person at all ...
cjl750's user avatar
  • 3,003
5 votes

Can we say or write : "No, it'sn't"?

It is neither accepted nor understandable to say or write that. Say it isn't (2 words). Or you could say "it's not".
Michael Harvey's user avatar
5 votes

Can we say or write : "No, it'sn't"?

'tain't okay. "It is not" can be contracted into a single contraction. This contraction is different from the one proposed by the original poster. According to Merriam-Webster, "'tain't" is at ...
Jasper's user avatar
  • 24.3k
5 votes
Accepted

How to politely respond when someone calls your name?

Taking English Lessons from Abraham is a new idea! It's polite to say "Here I am". But it is not a common response. You would have to understand the context in which someone is saying your ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
4 votes

Short answers - 'In Tokyo' v 'Tokyo'

It's correct (as a shortening of "I live in Tokyo"), but redundant, and doesn't add any clarity, so it would probably be omitted. It sounds odd because with the question "Which city do you live in" ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
4 votes

Is it OK to respond to "thanks" with "sure"?

It is a perfectly normal response that people will understand if you say it to them. I say of course when someone says Thank you, and I see that as a normal response also. The same with no problem, ...
wilkvolk's user avatar
4 votes

What to answer to "you're too kind"?

One thing other answers miss is the "other" reason why someone could say this: sarcasm. I don't know how it works in other languages or cultures, but sarcasm in English can be quite ...
computercarguy's user avatar
3 votes

"How aware are managers of ..." vs "How managers are aware of ...?" Any difference in Asking and Replying?

R1, R2, R3 and R4 all can be answers to A1. However, A1 and A2 do not have the same meaning. In A1 the emphasis is on the managers' knowledge about employee attitudes and behaviours but in A2 the ...
defectedWBC's user avatar
3 votes

Is it OK to respond to "thanks" with "sure"?

I'm American, born and raised, and even I wouldn't say "sure" unless I'm using it dismissively. Trying to get across that I don't care about their gratitude. This is just a product of my ...
Joseph's user avatar
  • 41
3 votes

Is it OK to respond to "thanks" with "sure"?

It's only standard in parts of the USA, as far as I know. In Eastern Canada*, "sure" comes across as rude. We normally say "(You're) welcome" or "No problem" instead, or ...
wjandrea's user avatar
  • 381
3 votes

Correct response for "Do you mind?"

Obviously this depends on whether you do, in fact, mind. If you don't, then: No, not at all. If you do, then if you're in the UK you'll probably want something suitably apologetic: Sorry, I do ...
Daniel Roseman's user avatar
3 votes

What to answer to "you're too kind"?

I see three versions of "you're too kind" : the most common one means "you're very kind" as explained in other answers sarcasm was also mentionned in other answers and means "...
Ghislain Bugnicourt's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

To Japan - is the preposition necessary?

No, it isn't necessary. Saying "Japan" would be equally acceptable.
equin0x80's user avatar
  • 967
3 votes

Why can I say "very" but not "so" in response to "How kind is she?"

The reason that so doesn’t work as a one-word response arises from another difference between so and all of its colleagues—very, extremely, highly, and the like. All of these latter express a position ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

answering "Yes" or "No" for a question "She doesn't hate me, right?"

This article might help: http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv330.shtml if you want to confirm a negative statement, you say no and if you want to disagree with ...
Myrman de Luna's user avatar
2 votes

answering "Yes" or "No" for a question "She doesn't hate me, right?"

I think 'right' is a red herring. With or without 'right', 'huh', 'eh', or 'does she' or whatever tag they put at the end, always go with 'yes' if you mean 'yes, she hates me', and 'no' if you mean '...
JK2's user avatar
  • 1,189
2 votes

Is it correct to use name or brand between "the" and "one"?

The following examples are colloquial/informal English, but best to avoid these in formal English. For names of people, no. If you mean the same brand of camera which Cindy owns, then something like ...
Billy Kerr's user avatar
  • 3,759

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