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32

Yes. In spoken English, you can tell the connotation of "interesting" by the inflection used. If the word is distinctly separated from the rest of the sentence, there is a meaning often more important than that actual word. It is frequently a mild pejorative but you have to see and hear the speaker understand the context. When written, it would appear ...


30

The complete line is: Monica: Oh wait, wait, unless you happened to catch the Wee One's production of Pinocchio at the Little Theatre in the Park". 'Oh wait, wait,' appears to have been spoken in the transmitted show. Reruns' is a mishearing, and is widely reproduced on the web. The remark is a humorous mockery of Joey's claim to be an 'actor' - ...


26

I can't think of any expressions that are specific to the case of noticing a recent change, but there are a number of common expressions that can be used whenever someone says something that should have already been obvious. Here are a few: "Thank you, Captain Obvious." (Captain Obvious, naturally, commands the Starship Duh.) "No duh." "No shit." (Or "No ...


19

To [verb] something up is to apply the qualities of the verb to the object of the action. Vague that up is not a common phrase (actually, I've never heard it used before) but the meaning here is rather clear if you take into account the context. Giles made an extremely vague statement, and Buffy is pointing out this fact by sarcastically requesting that he ...


19

In Indian English, quite a common word for someone who realizes things lately is... tube-light ....hey...tube-light... The reason is, here we have tube-lights that don't start the moment you put on the switch! They blink, blink and then get started. However, tube-lights these days come up with double 'starters' or 'chokes' for an instant start. But the ...


18

The best sarcasm is over your victim's head. Quote Horatio in Hamlet: There needs no ghost, my lord, come from the grave To tell us this.


18

"Interesting" can be used negatively if said sarcastically. In speech, at least, you'd usually be able to tell it was used sarcastically by a change of tone or through a pause: His delivery of the presentation was... interesting... This wouldn't necessarily mean his delivery was bad, it could just be odd – maybe he spoke with an unusual cadence, or ...


12

Alert the media! A situation where something I wouldn't have known if it weren't for you.


11

You have two somewhat conflicting answers already: Wichita Steve, understanding condescension in its original sense, says that Eames acknowledges Arthur's "courtesy" in praising an inferior. user3169, echoed by Toby Yuretich, understands condescension in its usual modern sense and says that Eames pointedly rebukes Arthur's "patronizing behavior". I think ...


9

fat chance is like a cynical no chance: You think you can win the lottery? Fat Chance. slim chance is when there is a small possibility. It does not infer any hidden meaning. Even though I did not study, there is a slim chance that I will pass the test.


9

You're right, it can have negative/neutral connotation. I think I more relatable example would be when people try new foods from different cultures, like bugs. One might say I tried crickets yesterday. It was interesting. In text, the context suggests that "interesting" implies that the experience might have been unpleasant. When spoken, there is usually ...


8

A good comment for an absent-minded person: What planet were you on? or Earth to (insert name), ...


8

When it comes to being written, sarcasm (what this is a case of) is very difficult to understand. There is no easy way to determine if (when written) the speaker meant this in the literal sense or to be sarcastic, though some tips would be to watch for punctuation: for instance, any use of ellipses (...) usually imply sarcasm: "Yeah, right..." "Yeah... ...


7

It means "in keeping with whatever would be natural for that thing". For a dog, it would not entail staying in a small box most of the time. "As nature intended" is being used sarcastically in this case.


7

It's hard to be completely sure without more context, but I strongly suspect that Eames' answer is intended as sarcasm. That means that meaning of the sentence as a whole is the exact opposite of the literal meaning of the words used - in this case, it would be something like "That comment was condescending, and I don't appreciate it." 'Condescension' ...


7

One I hear quite a bit is Boy, nothing gets past you!


7

The word "interesting" can often be used to describe something that wasn't nice. I know several other answers seem to say that, but, in my opinion, they tend to be describing (slightly, or very) different reasons why. Let me show you an example of why "interesting" has often become a bit of a negative word. A parent says to a child: Did you like the ...


6

In the U.S., you could say: Well, that news bulletin is a day late and a dollar short. Wiktionary explains how the idiom a day late and a dollar short refers to an action that is "taken too late and is too feeble to be of any use."


5

My interpretation of "Beat me over the head with it" is that it is being used sarcastically to mean "don't rub it in," "don't add insult to injury," or plainly "don't make me feel worse about something by reminding me of it."


5

No, doing all this waiting is not an idiom, but the construction is unusual in American English (the dialect of the movie, though the characters in question supposedly speak British English, as they're Irish). The men in this scene have been hired to quickly deliver proof that the man they're cutting up is dead, and B is sarcastically implying that ...


5

It's short for: I would say so [as well]. say has it's normal meaning: to communicate. In other words it means I agree with you. There's two possible thing they could be agreeing with: 1 that the cowboy boots are f-in' awesome. 2 that there was lots of questionable clothing leftover. It's likely that they mean the latter since they follow it up with a ...


5

In British English, 'interesting' can be a criticism. Here is an article that (part in humour) presents a translation table of British English to other English as spoken by 'foreigners' (here meaning non-British speakers). The relevant entry for 'interesting' is: What the British say: Very interesting What the British mean: That is clearly nonsense What ...


5

Peter has hit around the issue, but not really on the mark. In fact, fancy is a fancy (and somewhat archaic) synonym for imagine: fancy v 2. To imagine or suppose: "I fancy she is an exceedingly proud woman" (Jane Austen). Your quote is an expression of wonderment mixed with indignation: "Imagine asking me that!"


5

"right" in this case just means, well, right. Proper. Very. "you are a right question asker" means you just really asked a question. However, it is usually used sarcastically and in this case that is amplified by the "little", usually it denotes cuteness or adorableness as in "you are a little puppy". But it can also mean to belittle someone, make them less ...


4

Sure you can. Sarcasm is essentially saying the opposite of what you mean, but in a certain tone which reveals your true feelings. There's no reason you can't employ win in this fashion. Winning something has positive polarity (no or not doesn't appear in the sentence) but it doesn't entail positive emotions (the result might make you feel bad). Your ...


4

The expression beat me over the head with it is used when someone states the obvious, usually a painful truth. It's close to the expression rub it in, when someone goes on and on about something that is painfully obvious. As for over the head, there are three prepositions that are used in this context, at least in American English: to hit someone... on ...


4

The penny finally drops! The last horse crosses the finish line! Uh... yeah! (There is a specific intonation to "yeah" that expresses "you have just said something obvious". I am not exactly sure how to describe it, but it is a sort of rising-falling-rising.) Slow applause, or the phrase slow clap Yes. Yes, that is true. (Spoken slowly and without ...


4

Both of these mean that something is very unlikely to happen. That said, I believe the difference is more one of usage than of meaning. Fat chance is an informal expression; it's the kind of language you might hear among friends. It can also function well as a standalone exclamation, sometimes carrying an undertone of amusement: Do you think Donna ...


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