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It's more common to say I'll call you when I'm ready. I'll is more common than I will unless you want to emphasize will; for example if the listener has doubt that you'll call. But both ways are correct. Another choice is I'll call you once I'm ready. And another is I'll call you after I get ready / after I'm ready. And your sentence 2 is ...


0

They are all grammatical. We can even leave out more: The competition was good for David, bad for Peter. is also ok. If you mean that David did well in the competition and Peter did badly, it might be better to say: The competition went well for David, and ((it) went) poorly/bad/badly for Peter. If we use good, it could also mean that it was ...


6

"Be waiting" and "wait" are both imperative verb forms. Since they are both instructions to do the same thing (wait), it seems like they should have exactly the same meaning, but they don't. "Be waiting" is a progressive tense. The word "waiting" is not a gerund but a verb form (present participle). The progressive tense sometimes gives English learners ...


0

Also, I'm unsure if to call it gerund here, since the present participle "waiting" is being used as an adjective rather than a noun. the waiting person The person is waiting. I hope that you are waiting. As opposed to: his waiting The person's waiting was in vain. I hope your waiting doesn't bore you. (Though the simple noun "wait" is ...


9

They're both perfectly valid, but they convey different nuances... 1: I'm coming, please be waiting (a continuous verb, not a gerund = noun usage) - I want to find you waiting for me when I arrive 2: I'm coming, please wait - I want to you to wait (start waiting) for me now In practice they basically mean the same thing, but version #1 is far ...


3

Both sentences are both grammatical and idiomatic, but they differ slightly and in meaning and in tone. Merriam-Webster has an entry for come by, showing that it's is a phrasal verb: come by to make a visit : came by after dinner So your first sentence implies you are meeting at some prearranged place (it could well be the other person's residence, ...


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I'd be inclined to phrase as: "What's your secret for getting closer to women?" (i.e. asking a person for their specific approach) "What's the secret to getting closer to women?" (i.e. asking for a generally-accepted approach that applies to all people) Note that the question itself might be seen as somewhat sketchy, if you were to actually ask it...


1

"Shape" is a transitive verb. That means that it has both an active and a passive voice. In the active voice, the subject of the verb is what is acting. In the passive voice, the subject is what being acted upon. Except in highly stylized English and in interrogative sentences, the subject precedes the verb. So the subject in your sentence is "attitudes." ...


-2

I think that your examples work, even though they are not perfect as another user pointed out. I think that Could you please tell me what the time is? is better, but I believe that it is a matter of preference.


0

Neither is perfect - I would normally expect: "Have any of you got the time?", which is a bit of a mixture of both your examples.


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None of this is actually grammatically incorrect. None of them feels quite natural. I have occasion to send files of code with some frequency, and I would not write any of these in a business (or personal) email. I would be inclined to write: Please find attached a file containing code. Attached is a file containing code. Attached is a file with ...


1

Of the three examples you give, "keep your chin up" is the only one which really means to be positive. "Keep your head up" makes sense as an instruction, but is not particularly an idiom. A hairdresser might ask you to keep your head up so he can cut your hair properly. "Keep your chin up" is a popular idiom, and the inference is that your head is bowed ...


1

First, I agree with the comment left by Lorel. Your suggestions sound fine, although I might be inclined to shorted the third one: I placed an order online using the name Alex. I placed an order online for Alex. I placed an order online with the name Alex. That said, I think I would most likely use the phrasal verb you put in your title: pick up. ...


1

Any of those work. I might use: I placed a pickup order. The name is Alex. I placed a pickup order. My name is Alex. I'm here to get my order. It is under the name Alex. My name is Alex. I ordered XYX, is it ready? I have an order of XYZ coming. My name is Alex. Some places do not primarily identify orders by name, others do. Some use ...


0

As noted in comments, this is a programming question more than an english language question. In programming jargon, just as in other fields, common words are used with sometimes very precise meanings, and these meanings may not reflect the common usage of that word. A two-way binding is a connection between units that allows information to be passed in both ...


1

Kind is used here as a noun to mean a group with similar characteristics, or a particular Ref.. As J.R. mentioned, kind could mean the hopping, flying, crawling kind, or it could mean it's a type of beetle, fly or ant. There isn't a lot of difference in the context given but the following situation may explain better. Ben has a bug called Geoff. ...


0

‘his face filled with a mixture of shock and hurt.‘ There is a question of what style you prefer to convey. Each alternative has different nuances. A few possible choices: his expression filled with a mixture of shock and hurt. his countenance filled with a mixture of shock and pain. his expression filled with a mixture of shock and anguish/...


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Both sentences are correct, where in the first one you are talking about the situation in the present, and in the second one the situation at some point in the past. However, there is an error: you should say It has been a couple of days now.


1

These work: I had no idea that I would react the same way to her texting him as I had to her seeing him. I had no idea that I would react to her texting him the way I had to her seeing him. With two I hads and one I'd the sentence had become a little repetetive. So I changed your I'd to I would. Alternatives? Well, you could rewrite it. For ...


2

The easiest way is "I'm getting used to it."


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The most natural way to use "familiar" would be: I am familiarising myself with it. "Acquainted" can be used for things, but "getting acquainted" is more commonly used to describe people mutually getting to know one another. I would therefore use: I am acquainting myself with it. As this idiomatically shows it is you putting the effort in to get to ...


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