2

We use continuous tenses to describe things that are happening before, during and after a point in time. as describes such a point in time, so it is OK to use past continuous: As I left home, the wind was blowing hard. This indicates that the wind was blowing before you left home, at the time you left home, and afterward. As I left home, the wind blew ...


2

A really good question, Kamil - the joys of English! Version 1 is perhaps more logical because the 'but' serves as a red flag to the reader. That said, one would really use 'but' if the second clause challenges the first clause. In this case it doesn't. A mother tongue English speaker is more likely to switch the two qualifying classes around, so that they'...


2

There is a difference of nuance between ceramics and pottery. Pottery is a traditional craft, using natural clays and hand tools (such as a potter's wheel) to make pots, jugs, plates etc. And by extension, "pottery" is a type of homeware made of fired clay. Ceramics are a class of substances made by sintering a non-metallic mineral at high ...


1

Using "it" in this context is kinda awkward. A more natural way to say this is "I will study hard before the test" and "I will go shopping before the party".


1

I have found an answer, pottery references the products. Ceramic is the art of making products (pottery) using clay. But, for example, I could make pottery using gypsum too. So, the translation of this sentence in Spanish could be: La Cerámica puede ser productos hechos de arcilla endurecida. Anyway, I consider that the second sentence omitting pottery is ...


1

As pointed out a big shore is a very awkward phrase. The treasure was hidden on the shore is syntactically correct but semantically odd as you would normally bury treasure. The treasure was hidden underneath the shore that would be correct The treasure was hidden toward the shore No, toward implies movement. The treasure was hidden off the shore So ...


1

Both are possibly correct, but the meanings are different. In the first example. I (the administrator) admonished him (an unknown man) so that my friend (a different person) would stop the relentless bothering (of me) In the second case I (the administrator) admonished my friend (an second person) so that he (my friend) would stop the relentless bothering (...


1

The most natural way to announce the purpose of a meeting that you called is: I have called this meeting to discuss this issue. Note the present perfect tense, and no "on" after "discuss". Present perfect works best here because we use it to talk about a past events where the present result is the important part. In your example, the ...


1

The omission of words from a sentence is known as ellipsis. Whether or not the final verb can be omitted depends on what you think the complete sentence should be: He doesn't like the movies he used to like. He doesn't like the movies he used to do. In my opinion, the first sentence is the best complete sentence and, as like occurs in the second clause in ...


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