1 vote

What does "He climbed the mountain" mean?

To a native speaker, if you “climb up” a mountain, at the end of your exertions, you are higher on the mountain than you were previously. If you “climb” a mountain, you reach the top of that mountain. ...
1 vote

What does "He climbed the mountain" mean?

Normally, one climbs up the mountain. Then one climbs down it. In isolation, I would assume someone who "climbed Mount Example" had climbed to the top, and then back down it. So, "He ...
  • 4,459
1 vote
Accepted

How to express 3 people are coming tomorrow

Whenever there is concern about possible misunderstanding, say it differently. In this case, rather than: name-1, name-2, and name-3 are in which might make one wonder "are in what?", you ...
1 vote

"I get sick" Is "is" interchangeable with "'I am" as in "I am sick"

"I am sick" and other variations are almost exclusively American English. British people normally say "I am ill" (or other colloquial alternatives such as poorly). In British ...
  • 76.9k
1 vote

Should the comma be em dash in this context?

An emdash would work, but the comma also works. The word "even" here occupies the same role as the bolded words in sentences like these: MSN Messenger was discontinued in 2013, partly ...
  • 9,373
1 vote

What tense should I use when I mention a clock which has stopped?

On the level of basic grammar two of those samples rule themselves out: 'It was working last night, but it didn't work this morning' invokes clauses that are not comparable because their tenses don't ...

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