94

In the context of running errands, go to (some place) is idiomatic speech, and it means more than the physical act of going to that location. So, when I “go to the store,” I don’t merely park in a parking spot and then go home; rather, I go into the store – presumably to purchase some items. Similarly, when you go to the dentist, you go inside and get your ...


50

Because of how "to be" conjugates: I am - Who am I? You are - Who are you? He/She/It is - Who is he/she/it? We are - Who are we? You are - Who are you? They are - Who are they? You can see that the "who" makes no difference whatsoever, "are" is simply the form of "to be" that goes with "you" (whether "you" is singular or plural).


47

You can use she, if you pause to make the meaning clear: Who is she, playing the piano? Without the pause, this is a kind of "garden path" sentence, because it leads you to a wrong expectation about how the sentence will end, creating a cognitive dissonance. Once you hear "who is she playing..." you expect the sentence to end with something like "at ...


46

#3 and #4 are both correct; which you choose is a matter of style. #2 is incorrect because it has no articles at all. #1 has faulty parallelism so is technically incorrect, but you’ll probably find examples like that, especially when spoken.


44

There is nothing wrong with your grammar. The grammar checker incorrectly believes you have made an error in plurality between misinterpretations and seems, when in fact the verb seems is tied to the gerund using. This is evidenced by the three suggestions it offers: making misinterpretations singular; making seems plural; or making misinterpretations into a ...


42

As Void says, need (at least for some speakers) is a semimodal, and can be used in both of those ways. But She need not worry has a very different meaning from She needs to not worry. She need not worry can be paraphrased as "there is no need for her to worry". Your second sentence means "There is a need for her to not worry", which is ...


39

This is an older meaning of "as" that is now only found in some dialects. It is a relative conjunction, or perhaps a relative pronoun, and it means "that". It is not standard English (so don't use it). Standard English uses "that". It is sense 9 in the wiktionary definition as Rowling uses this to establish the character of Hagrid as it a marker of region ...


37

I'd personally go with this example: Come over to my place, dude. I'll treat you to a delicious pizza. to treat means to give someone something, typically food, either because they've done something good to you or you're simply doing it out of sheer generosity. As for your examples, they sound weird. Come over to my home bro! I will make you eat a ...


36

I think your statement was perfectly understandable, and although it might need very slight adjustment to be beyond criticism, I believe any English speaker would almost certainly understand what you meant. I would guess that the cashier was inexperienced and maybe had not come across this kind of request before. The only adjustment I would make is to ...


35

It's elliptical, that is, it drops some words for economy of expression, since the words omitted will be obvious to the native speaker. I looked up, though I could not see his face, nor could he see mine. American Heritage Dictionary "ellipsis" "1. a. The omission of a word or phrase necessary for a complete syntactical construction but not ...


33

I think this version works fine: The teenager couldn't help asking him, "Where did you meet this Frank?" There's no need to add something like he asked at the end of the sentence, because the text before the quote makes it clear who is talking.


33

Personal pronouns don't want to be directly modified, especially in the subjective case. We naturally say things like "That tall girl is in my class" and "The girl playing piano is very good". Nouns like "girl" work well with adjectives and participial phrases. We don't naturally say things like "That tall she is in my class" or "She playing piano is ...


32

That is fine. Need in that sentence is used as a modal auxiliary and we use the bare infinitive1 after modal auxiliaries. It's called a 'semi-modal' because it can act as both a modal verb (like should, can, might, may) and a normal/lexical verb (as in She doesn't need to worry). Try replacing the need with another modal auxiliary (for example should): She ...


30

Tone 10 years ESL in a Mandarin-speaking country, that is the "authority" I answer from. (SE wants 'sources', which accepts personal experience, though cited sources is the common habit.) Your question is about Mandarin speakers understanding English communication. In addressing the title of the question, not the synonyms of an ice cream bar, the issue is ...


30

One way to reduce the ambiguity is to include articles:  Put the green apples in the first box.  Put the red and yellow apples and the oranges in the second box. With the definite articles in place, we can see that red and yellow applies only to apples and not to oranges.  This "red and yellow" is inside the phrase "the red and yellow ...


29

I had dozed off when we crashed. .......................... when the car accident happened. You should use the past perfect tense because your falling asleep happened before the car accident. doze off phrasal verb If you doze off, you fall into a light sleep, especially during the daytime. [V P] ⇒ I closed my eyes for a minute and must have dozed off.


29

In modern English "You" is both singular and plural but it always takes a verb form that originally marked the word as plural. This happens because of the way "to be" conjugates in modern English. You are for singular You are for plural Examples: You are, you have, you weren't, and so on... They may all mean a single object or multiple objects. In Early ...


28

Though both StoneyB's answer and FumbleFinger's comment have already discussed the four "the"s in your question, I would like to provide additional information about articles, in hope that it'd be useful. Using articles properly is difficult for learners, especially the learners who speak languages that do not have articles. Thus, it's very useful for these ...


28

I will eat you a pizza doesn't make sense. I will make you eat a pizza means I will force you to eat a pizza. This does not suggest that it is a treat. Maybe you were thinking of I will make you a pizza. This means that you will make a pizza for the friend. I want to take a treat from you means that you want to take a thing away from the person. That thing ...


27

No she bludgering well won't! From what I understand, a bludger is a kind of ball in the wizarding world. However, here, bludgering looks like a euphemism/minced oath for bloody: → No she bloody well won't! Bloody well is an idiom: bloody well idiom Definition of bloody well British, informal + sometimes offensive —used before a ...


27

Simply repeat the use of apples. Rather than using the shortcut of red and yellow apples, use the expanded form of red apples and yellow apples: Put green apples in the first box. Put red apples, yellow apples, and oranges in the second box. Alternatively, given that only 4 type of things are under consideration, there is an even simpler method of ...


26

What is canonization? It is an act. Specifically, it is the act by which the Church declares something—a declaration, then. What does the Church declare? It declares that a person who died was a saint. The Roman Catholic Church, for instance, recently declared that Mother Teresa was a saint. What happens upon that declaration (that is, immediately ...


25

I think the most common phrasing of this sentence (which is ungrammatical exactly as written) simply adds the indefinite article before the age, in order to turn it into a noun. In short: My neighbour Mr. Lee is a 70-year-old who plays basketball every day. With this change, the pronoun now makes perfect sense exactly where it is.


25

It is fine, "Caution murmured ..." is being used as a figure of speech. I believe it's called a personification. A personification is "a figure of speech in which an inanimate object or abstraction is endowed with human qualities or abilities." "Caution" here is being treated like a human being, and it whispered to him that he was about to fall into a trap. ...


25

Your proposed sentence is not good because it doesn't provide an object for the verb 'understand'. Consider that you could say "Dudley was a very gifted boy whose teachers didn't understand mathematics." That would be grammatical and meaningful. But it is Dudley they didn't understand, so 'him' is necessary to establish the meaning. Your second pair of ...


25

"Up pops" is an idiomatic ways of describing the sudden appearance of something. "Up pops Netflix" is basically the same as saying "Netflix pops up". You've possibly seen this structure more than you think: I asked the question, and up went the hands Down goes the hammer, the item is sold. "Up" and "down" are both adverbs and it isn't unusual to begin a ...


24

In my opinion, the phrases: 'the results' - refers to the specific results that will be refined; 'the categories', - refers to the specific (provided) categories; and, 'the left' - refers to the specific side (i.e., not the right side, not the top, etc.). So, I don't think the word 'the' is overused.


24

Both are grammatical. Both are fully idiomatic. Both can describe the same set of circumstances, and be used in the same context. As usual with questions of aspect in English, the choice is a matter of how the speaker wishes to present the temporal focus. If the speaker uses the past infinitive here (to have started) they are setting the temporal focus ...


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