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2

Kentaro Tomono's answer is partially correct. In this case, "everything (they've got)" is the direct object, and "it" is an indirect object. The sentence: They gave it everything they've got. could be reworded as: They gave everything they've got to it. (although most people wouldn't actually say it that way) In this case, the implied "it" is ...


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I would like to answer even though I am not a native speaker!. So please ignore or downvote mine if you would like to. Your question is very confusing since the contents of the title and the contents of the question you are asking is different. If that IT is an indirect object, then it is OK, except that the following phrase after the "everything", which ...


1

He's been to France (present perfect) tells us that he has visited the country although it does not tell us when. And clearly he enjoyed that visit because It was fun. Now we go back in time to an earlier visit or visits. The tense we use to describe something in the past that took place before something else in the past is the past perfect. So: He had ...


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The problems about the waste-sorting are ... The problems with waste-sorting are... Both sentences are correct. "The problem(s) with ..." is a common noun phrase (as part of a phrase). "The problem(s) about ..." is similar noun phrase but "with" is used more often (as far as I've experienced) and can sound more natural.


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Yes, your sentence is common, valid and clear, though occasionally that construction could be ambiguous. Where it is unclear, the sentence should be rewritten. Here are some similar examples. "I bought a radio to play music." [I'm not making music, the radio is.] "She sold brooms to sweep leaves." [She is not sweeping the leaves.] BUT "She sold brooms to ...


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In your first example, "concocted" is a type of adjective, called a "participle, derived from a verb. Alternatively, you can view it as a passive verb subject to ellipsis. For example, you can use a pure adjective in such a construction Reading their litanies of untruth, false even in easily verified details, ... "False" is not a verb of any sort. The ...


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Both of your versions are ungrammatical, I think. That is because you are saying "is discussed". If the meeting is going on at the time when this phrase is being said, then you should have "that is being discussed in a meeting". Also, it seems that the "meeting" is a specific or definite event in this case, and therefore it should take "the"; if its a ...


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The impact was such that the canine flung into the air and fell into a drain five meters away. [buzzer, not grammatical] Correction: The impact was such that the canine was flung into the air and fell into a drain five meters away. The impact flung the dog into the air. [transitive] The dog was flung into the air by the impact. Principle parts: fling, ...


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As formatted in your original sentence, it contains two complete sentences with Subject/Verb/Object. I believe if you placed a semicolon (;) before the word but in your original format, it would be grammatically valid. You are writing the way you hear. This is usually a safe procedure. But in this case, you need a special punctuation mark to have it comply ...


2

It seems from your comment on Ronald Soles's post that your intended question is not about the specific subject being taken (i.e. French class or Math class), but about the level of schooling you are in, corresponding to how old you are and how long you have been in school. A quick Google search has confirmed that the Indian school system refers to its ...


1

Class here is taken to mean a particular group, year or level of students. So your first example What class are you studying does not work. It would be meaningful if you said that you were interested in beetles and someone asked you:What class (of beetles) are you studying. This is clearly not your intention. The other three examples are all possible but ...


7

It is wrong. He could not only understand it but also I could review the problem again. When you use "not only... but also..." it is like you are making two 'branches' of the same sentence. What appears after "not only" and after "but also" should be able to make a complete sentence with what went before, for example: I ate not only my sandwich but ...


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This is an interesting case. When I first read it, I didn't see anything wrong with it, but then when I read it more carefully, I concurred with you that there is something wrong with it: "Among the most significant challenges" and "in Canada’s Employment Insurance Program" are both prepositional phrases, and either one could have modified "found": "Among ...


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You're absolutely correct. The sentence is poorly written. When we say, 'Among a group of things...' we expect to then hear about some subset of the things in the group. Your examples are good, given the context of the piece. I also see a way it could be corrected by inserting the word 'these' and a comma in the right place. A 2015 inspection by the Mowat ...


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Yes, such a pattern is common and well-understood. Even the literal phrase of: My mom is out doing something. works, meaning that your mom is currently not here but is doing something else (but you don't know/don't want to say what).


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The first sentence is fine. “ready to swoop at any moment“ is taking the place of an adjective or another simple sentence. Compare: The eagle hovered and it was brown. The eagle hovered, brown. The eagle hovered, ready to swoop at any moment. The eagle hovered and it was ready to swoop at any moment. You cannot rewrite as above (in your second sentence). ...


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Some of your phrases are correct, some are not, and most of them are not the clearest way to communicate your meaning. Firstly, the best and most common way to say this is not in your list, which is: I found out about this song from Mary Your first sentence is correct, but just OK It was from Mary I found out about this song It might read better ...


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A) Suppose in the future we pick the Royal Princess. The implication here is really that we will not be picking the Royal Princess now, and perhaps not for some time, it's a discussion aren't potentially doing this in the future. A2) Suppose in the future we picked the Royal Princess. This is very similar to the above, but projects to a point in time ...


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I'm struggling to understand what you are trying to say, but if you're trying to ask whether or not cats would be called fat by most people (in some given context) then perhaps: Most cats are fat but would they be seen as fat? Most cats are fat but would they be considered fat? Most cats are fat but would they be referred to as fat? Most ...


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If we boil it down to a very literal sense we can see how it indicates surprise. I didn't think you were coming. Essentially, I "didn't think" of you - this can sound more distant/indifferent than: I thought you weren't coming. In this expression, I did think of you ("I thought") - the fact that you had been thinking about this could imply emotion ...


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There is no 'object' in this sentence. The main clause is copular, with books as subject and gifts as a subject complement of are. The when clause is a temporal adjunct modifying the main clause (or if you belong to a more traditional grammatical sect, modifying are).


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In your example, the word "eternal" is a predicative complement, as it follows the linking verb "is", and defines the subject "love". In grammar, a subject complement or predicative of the subject is a predicative expression that follows a linking verb (copula) and that complements the subject of the sentence by either (1) renaming it or (2) describing it....


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If the sentence means "The box has one side that is opening and is secured by shipping label", then it is acceptable to drop the "is". "opening" and "secured" are both participles, and they participles are allowed to be placed after the noun they are modifying without a copula. There does seem to be a missing "a" before "shipping label", however.


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There should be and "is" before "secured by ...", just as you 've guessed. Since "has" doesn't collocate with "secured by", we need to have an "is". However, for most (native) speakers of English, it sounds pretty normal even without the "is" since we don't always pay very much attention to all grammar in everyday situations (except grammar nazis) and our ...


1

Had you have is not grammatical: never, as far as I can think. The auxiliary have, in any of its parts (have, has, had, haven't, hasn't, hadn't) can only be followed by the past participle (had, seen, gone etc), not by any other part of the main verb. (There is a construction where have can be followed by an infinitive, eg I had them build a house, ...


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The first one can be rewritten in the imperative: Study and don’t watch tv. Stronger imperative: Study and don’t you dare watch tv! For the second one you can use was and drop to be: If I was the doctor, I’d be unhappy. Not using the subjunctive (were) makes it more informal.


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As you say, the construction is formal. There are numerous alternatives: You should / must / need to / ought to study.... In the second example, just omit to be If I were the doctor......


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My best friend and my father’s father both come from Wales. The answer is (A) - the two people that come from Wales are: Your best friend Your grandfather. The reason you may be wondering about option B (that it refers to your friend's father) is perhaps because you have seen a sentence like this: Both my friend's and my father are from Wales. The ...


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I understand the sentence to mean version A. For the meaning to be B you would have to add a possessive: My best friend's and my father’s father both come from Wales. But when spoken you can't tell whether it is friend's or friends and it relies on the "both" clue to distinguish. So I think your B is clearer My best friend's father and my father's ...


2

You can either say: Students studying in 5th grade or below are not allowed to go on this trip. or Students studying below 6th grade are not allowed to go on this trip. In the first case, below acts as an adverb modifying 5th. In the second case, below acts as preposition, and in is not needed in the phrase.


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If your intention to enumerate the reasons is implicitly clear, there is no requirement to do so explicitly. Indeed, by writing “firstly”, your second paragraph is clearly declaring your intention to enumerate. Be careful, however, that there isn't too much text between the first and the last reason, or the reader won't know when you have finished the list. ...


1

You could say either: I am feeling dizzy (you are feeling dizzy presently) I have started feeling dizzy (this can mean you feel dizzy presently, but can also idiomatically mean that you have recently begun to feel intermittent dizzy spells) The word "now" could be tagged onto the end of these, but is redundant if the statement or context makes it ...


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Future perfect The future perfect tense indicates completion in the future: By tomorrow afternoon, he will have changed his route. When I'm 65, I will have saved up a fortune. In two more weeks, you will have seen every car in the museum. However, this tense works like the present perfect: it puts the verb into a whole time interval ending at some ...


2

The verb is is in a subordinate clause: What's it mean that the review is now a criminal probe? It works like this sentence: Ryan Lucas said that the matter is now a criminal investigation. "That the matter is now a criminal investigation" is the object of "said". The subordinate clause is like a sentence within a sentence. As a whole, it serves as a ...


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The verb 'to get to know' means to become familiar with somebody. Another way of saying it is to learn who they are or make friends with them. It's different from 'to know' because it assumes that you don't know the person yet. I would like to get to know you because you seem like an interesting person. I don't already know you, but I would like to get ...


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If you are spreading the water with your fingers, spread, sprinkle or splash would be a good verb. Spread is a general purpose verb that means to cover an area. Sprinkle usually means spreading slowly and deliberately. Splash usually means spreading quickly and without much thought.


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Your question indicates that you are working in a specialized field, financial consulting. In finance, as you know, the word risk has a specialized meaning: In finance and investing, risk often refers to the chance an outcome or investment's actual gains will differ from an expected outcome or return. Risk includes the possibility of losing some or all ...


0

Use should, not shall. If you're wondering if you should, that's not a question, it's a statement. So use a period. Also, North should probably not be capitalized. Shall we head up north? I'm wondering if we should.


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Both prepositions, of and with work after experience but the choice is likely to depend on the context. For example, it is more natural to say: I don't have much experience of mountain climbing indicating that the speaker is relatively new to mountain climbing and implying that s/he would not wish to tackle difficult climbs. On the other hand, you ...


1

The correct structure of interrogative sentences in present simple tense is: Do / does + pronoun / noun + verb? or Question word + do / does + pronoun / noun + verb? So regarding to your question, the second option is the correct choice: "What time does the train leave?" Though, in the spoken language you can hear many people who omit the auxiliary ...


1

Usually in English, questions require inversion. So, "What time does it start?" and "What time does the train leave?" are correct, and "What time it starts?" and "What time the train leaves?" are not correct. (The main exception is that inversion is not used when a wh-word is the subject of the question. For example, if we want to ask for the identity of ...


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We use 'are' (the plural form of the verb 'to be') because 'goggles or cameras' is a plural phrase. I can climb higher with a thing called a ladder; we can kill people with things called weapons.


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The more likely meaning is something like: I needed to get out of my relationship with you, so that I could learn to love myself. It's poetic phrasing, typical in song lyrics. You can say it in ordinary conversation, but it would sound like you are quoting from a song or poem. The implication is that the other person in the relationship was ...


1

Your difficulty is because you are looking for "The words that natives use" and there is no fixed expression for this particular situation. Instead you need to explain what you mean as part of a conversation. And that means your friend is playing a role too. There are no magic words. Friend: can you pick me up again on Thursday? You: sure, hey, you ...


2

Many sentences without an explicit verb still have an implicit verb—a verb that has merely been elided. Answers to questions often work like this. For example: "What's your name?" "Verena." That is, "My name is Verena." I'm not sure those should count. These sentences, however, really do follow syntactic structures for a full sentence that inherently do not ...


1

There are any number of "sentences" that consist of short exclamations or interjections, and which contain no verb. An easy example of this is a response to a question: A: Is your answer a complete sentence? B: Yes. Now, I can't say whether your teacher will agree that "Yes" is a complete English sentence, but you can always try and see what she says....


0

Why not keep the "construction" as it is and just change certain things to plural? "New user accounts have been created for users ABC, DEF, GHI, JKL, and MNO, and a welcome e-mail has been sent to each user regarding the same." You could also say "New user accounts have been created for (1) ABC (2) DEF (3) GHI and a welcome e-mail has ...


1

"I had only a question regarding timing of our appointment and please feel free to answer; Is that also possible that we meet on Tuesday?" You don't need to say "I had only a question regarding timing of our appointment", just ask away. I agree with James K, this is quite good: "Is [it] also possible that we meet on Tuesday?" or "Is [it] also possible to ...


0

Can I say: What's for breakfast? Sure you can. We always ask our spouse/parents/friends this question. But I think I agree with FumbleFingers that it "strongly implies that the speaker assumes there's only one type of breakfast available" (well, may be not "strongly"). Now this "one" type can include eggs, bread, and a glass of milk. So, if you are in a ...


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The actual question is quite good. You should use a dummy subject "it" instead of "that". Is it also possible that we meet on Tuesday? The preamble is confusing for me: I had only a question regarding timing of our appointment and please feel free to answer; This uses the wrong tense, and there are other small errors, and I don't know what you mean ...


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