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0

This is your report "base on/based on" which you can proceed further. According to me we should use "base on" a) sentence is in Present tense..........b) "Based on" is not an Adjective.........c) Also, it is not used as passive voice In fact Based is an Adjective This is your report "based on" which you can proceed further. Could be rewritten as This ...


1

No When you use "does", "did" then verb is not to be changed to past or past participle. Answer: "The computer does not receive its updates". Best of luck!


0

No, you cannot rewrite the sentence in that way, because an adverb like in this way belongs most naturally to the nearest verb; your change would move it from altering to open.


1

You are correct that the meaning in your example sentences wouldn't change if you left out the word "over". From an informational/geographical perspective, "over" doesn't contribute anything. But from a communication perspective it serves at least 2 purposes: 1) It makes the sentence slightly informal and a little bit friendly or intimate. "Over on ...


0

A: I think we need to trust, moving forward, that … To me, starting now or from now on mean an intentional sharp change from past practice, but moving forward does not; it says this is what we need in the future, whether or not it has been true in the past. ‘A’ may be hinting that ‘B’ violated a trust that ought to have existed all along.


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Over = in a place that is on the other side of a space or area: Bill lives over on the other side of town. So, in effect, it locates a speaker in regard to the location described in a sentence.


1

It appears from your question that you’re talking about a “headline” that appeared as an overlay, not “captioning” that is trying to display all the words spoken (for the deaf or hard-of-hearing.) Headlines follow their own rules Headlines are not sentences, and they have their own distinct rules that vary from place to place (even from one newspaper or ...


1

Someone may disagree with one or other of the three sentences, but all of them are acceptable in idiomatic English. All 3 versions get well over one million hits each if you Google them.


1

end up dead is fine. No, being is not needed and is not really grammatical here. end up + adjective (dead, alive, rich, poor, sick, ill, crazy, etc;.) Those are adjectives that describe a person's state or condition. Please note the verbal phrases: - end up being a nice person = verbal phrase - end up getting rich [idiom] - end up getting home [get home, ...


1

moving forward, In this context, it means more than just in the future. "from now on" & "starting now". Can not be used as replacements because they convey only half of the meaning. Where as both "from now on" & "starting now" have a date line reference of now, at this moment and moving forward. A new beginning. Moving Forward means a) setting what ...


4

This sentence is correct -- it may seem rather confusing, because the sentence in question is shorthand. "Coming on," in this case, is short for "coming onto the field." As a full sentence, this would read: Why is the coach substituting Ronaldo? Who is coming onto the field in his stead? Basically, all the second question is asking is who will be ...


0

It is correct. 'on' goes with 'coming'. This means 'who is coming here/joining (us) instead'. Let's wait for other answers.


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...to stem the sudden upsurge of bitter memories, the stabs of regret and of longing (that) the discovery of the broken mirror had occasioned. The discovery of the broken mirror had occasioned the longing.


2

In this context, it means "in the future". It's somewhat redundant, since "will" already signifies the future, but it emphasizes that one is specifically discusses the future, and implies a contrast with past developments.


1

The answer to the English part of the question is that “Let’s split the check” is acceptable. We might also say “I would prefer to pay my share of the bill.” For more specific advice about how to handle the situation without seeming ungrateful, you may want to look at the Interpersonal Skills Stack Exchange site. Etiquette in specific situations is on-topic ...


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what is the polite way to say split the bill This is really a lesson on life not a question of English. The Question is a difficult one to answer. What you should do is look at what the other party is thinking not what you want. This seems to be the problem with today's society. Accept the offer graciously or pay the Whole Bill yourself. Firstly Splitting ...


1

Neither is idiomatic, nor grammatical "Its one wheel was made in Germany" implies "It has one wheel", and "This wheel was made in Germany". The subject is singular, so you can't use the plural verb "are". The making of the wheel is in the past, so I've used a past tense verb. "One wheel of it was made in German" Is closer to what you probably mean. Again ...


1

Both correct, I don't hear either that often. Edit: I should probably state the difference for those two in the answer also: "Tears slipped down my face" - Could imply that it was a very little amount and that they slipped out, almost as if you didn't want to cry. "Tears oozed down my face" - A constant stream / an abundance of tears. Not a commonly ...


2

It's a reduced relative clause: The funeral is at 3.00, (which will be) followed by a reception at X bar.


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I'm struggling to find the right words to explain this myself - but it's not a simple present tense [my memory is shaky but it may be a perfect tense?] 1. The report that we are talking about was produced at a past time [it must have been because it existed prior to you being able to show it, and it is a completed action]- and the contemplated action is ...


0

The latter is correct. You can rephrase your first statement to be correct by saying "After two weeks, you won't feel the same way." or as you said "After 2 weeks, you will not have the same opinion." Edit: I see what you were going for now in the first sentence. You can say instead, "After two weeks, you won't have the same opinion.".. "The same say" ...


1

I would say 1 is better than 2 however they both don't sound great. "My English is okay, but it's not to the level that I desire." "My English is good, but it could be better." I could see you saying, "My English is good, but my teacher is not satisfied" Saying better combined with another doesn't work, I would say "Is there another way to say this?" ...


0

"Order of words in an interrogative sentence is as follows: Verb + subject + ............................? When will ( Verb ) you ( subject ) come ?..-" https://www.quora.com/Which-sentence-is-correct-When-will-you-come-or-When-you-will-come However, If you said it either way, any English speaker would understand you and it would be correct. Edit: The ...


1

The OED has the following definition of in with examples underneath: In the process of, in the act of; in case of: often equivalent in sense to a temporal clause introduced by when, while, if, in the event of. 1477 Earl Rivers (Caxton) Dictes 67 Gladdenesse, whiche encresses daily in me in lernynghe wysdom. ? a 1550 Life Fisher in F.'s Wks. (E.E....


1

There is no cause\effect event (as your construction once...then... implies). What is said is that the realization of his cowardice and defiance and pride alternate with each other. Now - this, now (then) - that, and so on in circles.


1

The OED has the following definition of now...now with examples underneath: used to introduce antithetical clauses, phrases, or words a 1300 Cursor M. 24545 Nu i lig and no i stand, Bunden þus in balful band. 1390 Gower Conf. I. 23 Now hier now ther, now to now fro, Now up now down, this world goth so. c 1400 Mandeville (Roxb.) xiv. 65 Riȝt ...


3

The correct sentence is This is your report based on which you can proceed further. Here, "based on which" is a relative pronoun preceded by a preposition. With the remainder of the sentence, it forms a relative clause that describes your report. This sentence can be modified to a simpler form which would be easier to analyze: You can proceed ...


0

You are correct that the sentence: The new pair of scissors I have purchased are blunt. is grammatically correct. You are also correct that it is an elision, or shortening of The new pair of scissors that I have purchased are blunt. The general principle is that modern English permits such elision whenever the result is clear and not ambiguous. Long ...


1

You’re right in saying that the past and present tense have been used. Thought and had are past tense and here it means they used to have thoughts about being supers (super heroes) But know it is (present tense) fantasy (impossible/imaginary)


2

This would depend on whether you're asking for a specific size (large), or if you're asking about the several sizes that are considered large (large, extra large, extra extra large, etc). "Do you have these shirts in large size?" This sentence indicates that you're asking for shirts in the size known as Large. In which case, it'd be better to remove size,...


2

In American English, a more natural way to ask this question is: Do you have this shirt in (a) large? The "a" is optional.


1

The items following "neither" are supposed to be separated by "nor", so if you separate them by "and", then according to the "official" meaning of "neither", that changes the meaning: since different items are supposed to be separated by "nor", separating them by "and" suggests that they are one item: "Neither (you and your girlfriend came), (nor my dad), (...


2

All of them are perfectly acceptable. I'd lean more towards "clothing" on the first two, but there is nothing wrong (as far as I'm aware) with any of these. To my ear, "brand name/name brand" are both slightly AmE, and in the UK it would be more natural to just say "branded". There is probably a slight difference between a "name brand" and a "designer ...


0

Jessica lives in Nova Scotia--specifically, in Halifax, where the unemployment rate is 5%. As for the original version, this is a worthwhile sentence only if the 5% unemployment rate is important to/for Jessica, and that very soon now we'll get to the point.


0

Both answers are **grammatically* correct. However, there's a difference in meaning. İn the 1970s scientists found out that chemicals, having been released into the atmosphere, destroyed the ozone layer. The above sentence (with the 2 commas added) means "the chemicals" just "destroyed the ozone layer" at one point (at a moment in time or just in a day). ...


1

Phrases you mentioned in present continuous do describe an ongoing action, but the phrases with have someone do in present didn't refer to an ongoing action. You may ask how about the 5th phrase, you can use present continuous for future plans, like below: what are you doing this weekend ? I am playing soccer this weekend I am working this Saturday. I ...


2

I would be happy with plural items after 'neither', and indeed after 'nor'. Neither mother and father nor all the gods can be as gracious as the true Guru. a considerable quantity of finance, which neither mother and father nor part-time jobs can present Neither the King and Queen nor the Norwegian authorities were aware that such measures ...


-1

Generally speaking, "neither" is meant to be used with two objects, and your examples are no exception. Neither of these two examples are "proper," but if you were to select one, the first would make more sense. Essentially, saying "Neither you nor your girlfriend came" Would be a less redundant way of saying "You did not come, and neither did your ...


0

The verb hurt has rather different meanings when it is transitive or intransitive. The transitive verb hurt means "injure, wound, inflict pain". From this comes the past participle hurt which means "injured, wounded, having pain inflicted". So "it is hurt" is either an adjectival use of this past participle, or in some contexts a present passive. Either ...


0

You couldn't really say, "I think it is hurting", as you already said the leg is in pain. Hurting describes that its in pain, while "it is hurt" is saying something isn't right. You could have said, "I woke up this morning and I noticed my leg hurting, so I think it is broken/damaged".


2

Another option: turn it inside out. In Halifax, Nova Scotia, where Jessica lives, the unemployment rate is 5%.


-1

As I work on the content of the product, he is calling the software companies Are the tenses used incorrectly? Yes, if you rewrite the sentences like this they will work As I work on the content of the product, he calls the software companies As I am working on the content of the product, he is calling the software companies The original sentence mixes ...


1

I believe the construction to be correct. It may be recast as one of the following: “As I am working ... he is calling ...” “As I work ... he calls ...” “As I am working ... he calls ...” The meanings of all four possibilities are clear and identical in describing the state and actions of the two people. This is not to say that “I work” is ...


0

First, your example sentence is a little redundant. Typically, we'd say either: I prefer money over happiness. or: I choose money over happiness. This isn't to say your example is ungrammatical; however, it would be unusual to see, except perhaps in a special context, such as: Most people choose happiness over money, but I prefer to choose ...


0

If you're trying to say that money is more important than happiness to you, it should be: I prefer money over happiness. or I choose money over happiness. The construction "prefer to choose" is too convoluted for what I think you mean. Literally interpreted, your sentence indicates that you would choose money and not happiness, even if you had the ...


6

I really like alephzero's answer, because I find long mid-sentence parenthetical (or dashed) clauses not really compatible with direct journalistic or business writing, which is the style that is perhaps being aimed for here. I'd consider: J lives in Nova Scotia's capital, Halifax, a city with a 5% unemployment rate. or if you feel the audience needs to ...


6

Reorder the clauses so there is no ambiguity. The subordinate clauses can only refer to things mentioned earlier in the sentence, so: Jessica lives in Halifax, a city with an unemployment rate of five percent and the capital of the province of Nova Scotia. You might want to replace "and" by "which is", but IMO the grammatical arguments either way are ...


12

I think the simple answer is, Don't be afraid to break up the sentence. I'd write, "Jessica lives in Halifax, the capital of Nova Scotia. The unemployment rate in Halifax is 5%." We have a fair number of questions on this site about "how do I eliminate the ambiguity without adding more words". Very often the answer is, "There is no other way. You have to ...


5

Use of parentheses will easily clarify this: Jessica lives in the city of Halifax (capital of the province of Nova Scotia), where the unemployment rate is 5 percent. The focus, and hence the unemployment rate, remains with Halifax.


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