New answers tagged

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To add to Gustavson's answer, "as a(n) X" is not an appositive phrase. An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that provides an alternative description of the subject and stands side by side with it: John, a politician, was fond of speaking to the public. (John is a politician, and he's fond of speaking to the public) "As a(n) X" is a prepositional phrase ...


1

On page 38 of Fowler's Modern English Usage (2nd edition revised by Sir Ernest Gowers), we can read: As = in the capacity of. When this is used, care must be taken to avoid the mistake corresponding to what is called the UNATTACHED PARTICIPLE; we can say He gave this advice as leader of the opposition, or This advice was given by him as ...


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"Don't take a decision that/which is based on your assumptions." is more expected. "that is" and "which is" are likely candidates for omission in that context in particular. Your second version, for clarity, is "Do not take a decision when/while you are based on assumptions" or similar wording. With as subject the person addressed to, and as object "your ...


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This is known as agreement of tenses (amongst other names). Wikipedia says: If the main verb of a sentence is in the past tense, then other verbs must also express a past viewpoint, except when a general truth is being expressed. So you are correct that the second verb should also have been in the past tense: I thought you were on leave. I ...


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a) is fine, but doesn't say what he has confidence in. It may be obvious from the context of the statement, or it may require some elaboration. b) is also fine and adds what it is he has confidence in - himself. It probably does need expansion of what type of thing about himself he has that confidence, such as completing tasks of type A, or charming people ...


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If "sentence" means a chunk of writing that begins with a capital letter and ends with a period, then the answer is yes. What you've written is not "bad" or "wrong." It's something people do for rhetorical effect, such as to sound dramatic. In genres like creative writing, fiction, or just informal writing in general, you can do things like that. If "...


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For the situation that you describe, "Tell me what time he comes in today" would be best, I think. If you say it that way, it's clear that your goal is to learn what time it was when he walked in. (To make sure he isn't being a bad employee who thinks it's okay to arrive late, for example.) You don't need the today if it's already obvious that the request is ...


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Well , grammatically yes .. it's like saying John could ride horses better than anyone Which is correct .. it will have no meanings if we say john could rode ... .. i thought you are on leave Means in the last few hours i was thinking youre on leave I thought you were coming late today Were+verb-ing is correct affer a past tense Another ...


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First, note that it isn't the same as God made me help others (= God forced me to help others) - that idiom requires a bare infinitive clause, not a to-infinitive clause. [I don't think you thought it was this, but others might be confused] So, made here is literal: created, or formed. The to-infinitive used in this way (where the main predicate does not ...


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There is a small group of verbs that can take an object followed by an adjective: examples include make, get and consider. According to the Cambridge Dictionary, want is one of these words, and it also specifies that the adjective can be a past participle or a present participle: I want these curtains cleaned - past participle I don't want him hanging ...


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This is a noun phrase. It contains a dependent clause (a relative clause) The word "Everything" is a pronoun. It is being described by a relative clause. In general, a noun phrase can consist of a noun or pronoun with various determiners, adjectives and relative clauses. The following are all noun phrases: sheep white sheep the white sheep the ...


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I would change one thing in your examples: You {verb}, I {verb}. I MAKE a difference. The word make, when used with I in the present tense is make. If you used the word “he” or “she” makes would then be correct. -I make a difference. -He makes a difference You do not need the “s” in your template.


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The correct usage would be option a). The word date has no tense when used as a noun. Transfer, it’s adjective would remain the same as well in this case. The tricky part is that transfer, like many words, can be a noun or a verb. “A transfer” (noun) is not conjugated, “to transfer” (verb) would be conjugated. In your situation we are using it in it’s noun ...


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The use of "on the other hand" looks legit. However, you should use "you're" instead of "your". I am bit confused about about what "criminally poor" might mean.


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There is such an example from the literature on ethical issues in societies:'On the other hand members of the society have prima facie claims to equal access to common resources, and the present aged can not be abandoned in order to benefit the present young when they will become old.' , Extending the Human Life Span: Social Policy and Social Ethics, 1977. ...


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In my opinion, the first sentence is correct. The concert will happen sometimes in the future. So this is already a future incident. There is no need to say, the next incident in the future. As per the rule if the first one is in future tense then the second one should be in the simple past tense.


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I assume you want to use the open future condition which means that the first sentence is correct.


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Not "would become old." "Become old" is OK, though you might mean "became old." The choice of tense depends on when all of this takes place. If the boy is young George Washington, so his parents are now long since dead, you'd use became. But if the boy is alive today and his parents are still young, then it's become. By the way, in answering that, I ...


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Neither of the answers is idiomatic. Native English speakers do not talk about people becoming old. They will say things like when they age, when they are old, in their old age, when they retire and so on. If you have to choose between the two options, prefer when they become old but be aware that it is not fluent English. When they would become old ...


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The only grammatical fault with I can see with what you wrote is that you pluralised "birthdays". Aside from being uncommon to do so, if you were actually wishing that all future birthdays are happy it becomes a redundancy to then say "any many more". The other unusual thing about your statement is that you are wishing future ones be "happier", and that ...


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A conditional sentence can use the future tense in the second clause: If you study hard, you will pass the exam. If I have time, I will visit him. This is called by teachers, a conditional sentence, type 1 used for future, real situations or facts. Teachers usually teach present unreal or future conditionals as given in the OP's examples: If you didn'...


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Some day I'll play piano for a living and make a fortune at it.


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After correcting minor syntax errors, the meaning OP intends is something like... Now, let's use the formula above so that [+we can] achieve the further results ...but he wants to express this in a "fancier" (more formal) way. In which context it's worth noting that "imperative" let's is a relatively informal construction in the above. Possible ...


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'Where my' is not correct here. In fast, informal speech, native English speakers often pronounce words smaller and shorter, and run them together, so they can be heard as something else. 'Where am I' might be spoken as 'Wherea mI', which could be heard as 'Where my'.


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No. My is not an abbreviation for "am I". In Old English "My" and "Mine" were the same word, (min) But by 1200 a reduced form "mi" later "my" was used when the next word started with a consonant. And by 1500 "my" was used for all words. It is completely unrelated to "am I", which in Old English would have been "eom ic" In some dialects, "am I" can be ...


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Yes it is wrong! You would have to say: "Has that been shown?", because "that" refers to an object that would be described by "it" and for those objects you always need to add an "s".


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Yes, it is wrong. Have needs to be replaced by had. The usual construction would be a hypothetical statement, such as: Had that been shown, we would have seen it. Alternatively, someone might say: I will not have that being shown in my house. Note that the verb needs to change from been shown to being shown.


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Formally, "has finished," "had finished," and "have gotten." Colloquially, you'd be likely to hear "is finished," "was finished," and "get."


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This usage of too is an example of understatement. It occurs only with verbs in the negative. My mother wasn't too pleased about the mess in the kitchen. Variants with the same meaning are to be "none too pleased" and not to be "any too pleased."


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"Too" in this sentence is being used as "very". This is one of the meanings that "too" can have in a sentence, functioning as an adverb. In this sentence, it is clear that the subject of the sentence is not very appreciative of the car - the sentence is also correct without "too", but a little less idiomatic.


3

It refers to a song sung by Pooh elsewhere in the story - see winniethepooh_uk.tripod.com/poohbear/id14.htm (scroll down a couple of paragraphs). I'm pretty sure the sense is "I don't get any fatter no matter what I do", or "...whatever I do". It is shortened to "what I do" to fit the rhythm of the song.


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To avoid unclear word combinations like '(their system) which I struggled with' or 'struggled with myself', I'd suggest to attach (or to write as a separate sentence) the words in this order: ... and, on occasion, I honestly struggled with that myself.


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Is it possible to determine that above sentences are used for present or future conditional? Yes, it is possible. The Present Conditionals sentences are built according to the syntactic structure as follows: If / When simple present (subordinate clause), simple present (main clause)] [simple present (main clause) if / when simple present (subordinate ...


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Yes, your use of "on which" is correct here. When one refers to websites, the preposition used most often is "on". Another example to illustrate this is, "The information can be found on our website, which is very well organised". Changing things around a little in order to use "on which", this would become: "Our website, on which the information can be ...


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I feel that either are acceptable and idiomatic. When referring to content, we do say that things are "on" a website - this has already been answered here. "Where" can refers either to a place or a situation/condition. As you are talking about administrators and policy I'm going to guess that you work in computing - do you know what a WHERE clause is in ...


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If I am understanding your question correctly, I think that it would be more natural to say, Here is your corrected paper You could also use "proofread" in place of "corrected" in the above sentence. If it is a paper for which the students are awarded a mark/grade/percentage and not a paper that they will change following your comments/corrections, ...


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If you would like to stick as closely to your proposed slogan as possible, I would suggest altering it slightly to Makes a difference This links nicely to your second bullet point in that it is clear that wearing it will have a positive effect on the consumer. Your current phrasing is more like a command to someone else that they should make 'it' ...


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I want to write a book before I turn 40. You're being direct and assertive. I would like to write a book before I turn 40. You're being polite or wishful, or implying "I would like to write a book before I turn 40 if possible". I want to have written a book before I turn 40. You're wanting some time to pass between you writing the book and you ...


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A "sale" is a noun in this context, meaning the event of selling something - in this specific context it refers in a general way to the money made from the sale, i.e. "Sales" means "the total amount of money made from all of the sales". Sales will double. ("double" is a verb) This refers to the process of that amount doubling, more transactions/sales, ...


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I have no issue with the use of 'on' like this. If you want to be more explicit, you could use 'regarding' instead. Also, whilst some may disagree, I would encourage the use of a comma before the 'and' to disambiguate as to whether you are referring to two or three things: "On Equations, Series, and the General Method for Solving Questions" With the ...


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I would suggest: The bullet missed my head by only a few inches.


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According to A Student's Introduction to English Grammar (pp. 70, 297, 303), the object is a kind of complement which almost always has the form of a noun phrase (NP). Any object is a complement, but not any complement is an object. Everyone likes her. Her is a complement, and since it's an NP — consisting of a single pronoun, her — it is also an object. ...


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The examples above can be both future unreal conditional and present unreal conditional. Without context, they cannot be distinguished as one or the other. https://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/grammar/conditional_special.htm


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For a formal written version I would say: Are the pixels of a 1080p 43-inch screen bigger than those of a 1080p 32-inch screen? In speech, I would drop the "one", and can imagine this being said as: Does a 1080p 43-inch screen have bigger pixels than a 1080p 32-inch? The "32-inch" effectively becomes a sort of alias for the product type, and it's ...


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"I was kind to them for a month before I became angry" and "I had been kind" are both possible in this case because of the word "before". This makes it clear that the being kind took place before the becoming angry. The past perfect is not necessary, but in written language the past perfect looks good and you will find it in literature. Because "before"is ...


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The following paragraph applies to my idiolect: It's "I have to wait for the bus", "Do you have to wait for the bus?" and "Yes, I do". "Have" is not invertible, although there are archaic uses of it being inverted (e.g. "Baa, baa black sheep, have you any wool"). "Have got" is redundant and ungrammatical. From what I can tell, "have got" is much more ...


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The answer would 'yes', assuming it's true. Doesn't require anything else. Dependant upon the context you may want to stress the need to wait : Do you have to wait (as opposed to walking) - the answer could be emphasised by yes, I do.


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The second sentence makes perfect sense with 'wouldn't move' and indicates the opposite position to the first sentence.. In the first it implies he doesn't like them whist in the second it implies he will be sorry to see them go.


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Just adding to the list of answers. I usually hear 'hail a cab', or 'hail a taxi'.


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When be is used as an auxillary verb, it can be followed by past participle to form passive voice, or present participle to form progressive or continuous aspect. Some verbs have a built-in passive meaning or can be used passively without the auxillary. Choke can mean either: causing a state of restricted flow - choke in this case will take an object. ...


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