Skip to main content
16 votes

"She smashed her finger in the door." — What does this mean? Could you please describe this process?

Saying something was caught/trapped "in the door" is an idiomatic (in British English at least) way of saying something was caught between the door and the doorframe as it closed, either on ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
7 votes
Accepted

Need or needs with bare infinitive

*He need/needs worry about the weather today. This is ungrammatical. "Need" can be either a modal auxiliary verb or a lexical verb. As an auxiliary, it occurs only in non-affirmative ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
2 votes

"Items should be paid for within 14 days <of> <after> receipt." — What's the difference between "of" and "after" here?

As has been pointed out in comments, you can't use both within and after in this context. The dictionary example... Items should be paid for within 14 days of receipt ...is fine, but if the OP wants ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

"She smashed her finger in the door." — What does this mean? Could you please describe this process?

I was born in, and still live in, the USA. Yes, I would say "she smashed it in the door." This seems to happen in my family with car doors most of all. For example, one might be standing ...
MJBE's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
Accepted

I'm trying to read/understand the following sentence

I'm not sure I understand the A/B diagrams you propose. But as TimR's comment shows, we can understand the structure by deleting the second use of the word "operations." It is repeated to ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 13.6k
1 vote

Is "Plan what you will do when" a full sentence? What does it mean? Can "when" and "what" switch places?

The question asks if To plan what you will do when can be a full sentence. Possibly. It has the sense of planning a schedule; this is what you will do at each point of time. However it's not the way I ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
1 vote

Is "Plan what you will do when" a full sentence? What does it mean? Can "when" and "what" switch places?

Constructs like yours of the what-when form are highly conventional in English, and part of that convention is that the when always follows the what. For example, What will you be eating and when? ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

"rise 2%" VS "rise at 2%" VS "rise by 2%"

"... rose x%" and "... rose by x%" always mean exactly the same thing: The new number is x% higher than the old number. "*... rose at x%", however, is ambiguous, at least ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
1 vote

"Items should be paid for within 14 days <of> <after> receipt." — What's the difference between "of" and "after" here?

I agree with what others have said in comments and +1 to FF. I want to add that your sentence (2) doesn't work because "within 14 days" and "after receipt" scan as two separate ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
1 vote

"I will collect my necklace after it is being prepared"

When you want to express the idea that you will pick up the necklace when the work has been completed: ... after it has been prepared. Use the past participle when "completion" is the idea....
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
1 vote
Accepted

"I will collect my necklace after it is being prepared"

The meaning is "when the preparation is completed", and so it is naturally expressed with a perfect aspect "when/after it's been prepared". Note that "prepared" is ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
1 vote

Use of "that" in "the meaning is that of a noun"

The word "that" is a pronoun, and it refers to "the meaning". Writing out in full you get: ... the meaning is the meaning of a noun... It is rather badly expressed. The overall ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible