41

As it says "She ..." we are talking about one girl, and not a group of girls. So it can't mean that there was a group that divided into pairs and each pair ran together. Instead it means that she took two steps of the stairs in one stride. Normally you tread on each step of the stairs. If you are running you might go over two steps. This is what is meant ...


21

It's a singular "she", so it's not about pairs or groups of children running. "Two at a time" refers to the stairs. She is skipping alternating steps, ascending two steps with each stride.


3

Not quite. Said as much is an idiom meaning said roughly the same thing. It doesn't actually have the idea of the amount they said. She caught herself means "She stopped, and didn't do something". So, together, it means Hadn't Mrs Pritchard nearly said the same thing, but she stopped and didn't say it?


2

You have used ‘persist’ correctly. However, if the commission is undergoing criticism, it would be excellent to include that, as well as who is doing the criticism, if you haven’t mentioned it elsewhere. It would be good to include because it’s information that would help the reader understand two things: what the commission is persisting in spite of, and ...


2

It simply means that she took two steps at a time. To better visualise it she skipped one step each time she took a stride.


2

Both are possible. If we look at the possible answers: I want Joe to be my best man. I want my best man to be Joe. This is essentially the same as comparing: Joe is my best man. My best man is Joe. There are slight differences. The first sentence is a "about Joe", the second is "about my best man". There is also the matter of "end ...


2

Nothing is said about whether you hit him or not. To take a swing at someone or something (e.g. a ball in a game such as baseball) is to attempt to strike them or it, with a fist, weapon, bat, etc. The context or following words will clarify whether the swing connected (the objective was achieved). It is possible to say "He took a swing at me but I ducked". ...


1

"Full form" here does refer to a whole body. It refers to the entirety of the thing being referenced. In this case the thing that has been referenced is the hands so full form would refer to the entire thing(we can assume here that it would be a human or similar) including the hands The "chiefly" refers to the entire list that follows it. So it mostly ...


1

I assume that the preceding sentence reveals some new information that should cause you to change your opinion of the topic. Metaphorically, the topic is now dressed in (wears) different clothing, which alters its appearance (aspect). Later: I wrote this answer before the asker added the paragraph in which the sentence appears. I would change it only to ...


1

A governess is hired to take care of children. They are her "charges". These charges had reached an age where they didn't need her to take care of them ("they had outgrown her"), so she lost her job.


1

The creator of the program is being interviewed. He is talking about how he controls the way his program will appear to viewers. He says that when the program is presented on different devices (computers or television sets), the appearance may change due to different settings, such as brightness and contrast, that the viewer can change. He simplifies his ...


1

The second sentence strikes me as atypical English usage. A more typical way of writing it would be "She ran up the steps two at a time", meaning that she ascended two steps with each stride. Although "stair" can be used as a singular noun, the word "step" is used far more often for that purpose. If someone goes "up the stairs" from the first to the ...


1

Yes, the preposition "with" can be used as you propose. From Merriam-Webster Dictionary: on using "persist" in a sentence: The reporter persisted with his questioning. on recent examples from the Web: The additional returns that investors demand to hold corporate bonds are increasing as market volatility persists from coronavirus concerns and ...


1

Both work the same, but option 2 sounds much more natural. Option 1 makes you sound like a robot, so I would recommend avoiding it. (This response is specific to American dialect, so it may or may not apply to you.)


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