88

The confusing term seems to be "respecting". This is a somewhat different meaning of "respect", that is still in common use: respecting (prep): in view of : considering with respect to : concerning The first amendment states that Congress shall pass no law related to (or with regard to) the establishment of a (state) religion. This has ...


78

From the sentence alone, it could mean either #1 or #2; there is no way to tell without context. #1 would be the more common meaning of this construction, but #2 is perfectly proper. In this case, the previous paragraph makes it clear that Tom was happy (the term "boisterously" is used), and that Daisy and Gatsby were not. Therefore, #1 was intended. ...


74

The "standard" spelling is Scary-looking thing, isn't he? I'm not entirely sure, but I believe this kind of spelling is called "eye dialect": Eye dialect is the use of nonstandard spelling for speech to draw attention to pronunciation. The term was coined by George Philip Krapp to refer to the literary technique of using nonstandard spelling that ...


65

Eton is a prestigious British public school for boys. As an aside - in the British education system, a public school is a privately run school that people pay (large) fees to attend - normally a fairly old one. They're called 'public schools' because when they were established, schools were generally owned and operated by groups like the church or trade ...


64

She dressed like an owl. When looking at her (say from a distance) she vaguely resembles an owl. Maybe she is wearing a long brown frumpy gown or over-sized sweater, has very large horn-rimmed glasses, and a hairdo that makes it look like she has owl ears. As an example of usage, often a person who is wearing a tuxedo will be described as "dressed like a ...


63

"xxx is so yesterday" doesn't mean that xxx is the same as yesterday-in fact, the phrase isn't usually applied to dates at all. What it typically means is that xxx, whatever that may be, is out of fashion. It is a thing of yesterday, not a thing of today. There are several variants of this phrase in English, substituting in various past times, such as "xxx ...


50

It's a rephrasing of the old programmer's adage: "don't be clever"! Or Brian Kernighan's famous quote: Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you are as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it? Basically it's saying that you shouldn't write clever and/or tricky code because ...


45

This figure of speech comes from a test to see if spaghetti is cooked. You take some spaghetti out of the pan and throw it at the wall. If it sticks to the wall then it's cooked. (Do not actually use this test. It doesn't work well and it makes a mess.) So when you throw something at a wall to see what sticks, you are testing something to find out if it ...


45

There are two issues here. As Cardinal says, need sometimes behaves like a modal verb: 1) taking a 'bare' infinitive instead of one marked with to, 2) uninflected for 3d person singular, and 3) deployed without do support Specifically, it may be used this way in negatives and questions. Need he pursue this any farther? He need not pursue this any ...


44

Conformity is a virtue, creativity suspect, humor forbidden, and voice mute. This isn't a list describing "conformity", it is a list of things about legal writing. Conformity is a virtue. Creativity is suspect. Humor is forbidden. Voice is mute. I think the 4th part might not be clear. The word "voice" here is referring to the author's "voice" or their ...


43

To ship two people or characters, means wanting to see them in a (romantic) relationship. This is usually something fans of a show or other popular medium do.


41

This is an older meaning of "as" that is now only found in some dialects. It is a relative conjunction, or perhaps a relative pronoun, and it means "that". It is not standard English (so don't use it). Standard English uses "that". It is sense 9 in the wiktionary definition as Rowling uses this to establish the character of Hagrid as it a marker of region ...


38

To me, this seems like an unusual usage of phrasal verb get after: get after 2. To pursue something that is a problem or menace: If you don't get after those termites, your house will be destroyed. (TFD) You get after [someone/something] (with something). Wareheim's usage strikes me as a (US) Southernism, and the article does state that the man has a ...


36

We’ll cut him down as for the border he rides. Ah, one of the things one can do in English, but which is non-idiomatic and thus generally only appears in poetry, is re-arrange clause order like this, sticking the prepositional phrase in the middle of things. "As" here means "while", and the more conventional place for "for the border" would be at the end: ...


34

No, he didn't troll. Yes, this is the normal term used to ask a person to join the conference call/meeting. Bridge is a common term used in the companies instead of the Conference call. So he is asking you to join the conference call, and not any insult or troll. As source from the wiki about the conference call, the bridge is defined as: Conference ...


34

Your conjecture is invalid. Follow takes an object and an optional locative complement designating the destination or path of movement. But it never has a causative sense: the subject does not cause the object to move.


33

It doesn't quite mean "I saw him when he was washing the car". As I have explained elsewhere Verbs of perception like see, hear, watch, feel take both -ing-form and bare infinitival clauses as complements, but there is a slight difference of aspect between them: The infinitival complement implies that what is perceived is a completed action. ...


33

A "hairline crack" is a very thin crack that threatens the integrity of some object. The "grip" is where you hold the golf club. The "graphite shaft" is the long part of the club, which these days is frequently made from graphite not wood: A 3-wood is a particular kind of golf club used for hitting the ball long distances: The man says the crack is "...


32

"Front page news" is a synonym for the important or notable story. It's the news that's important enough to put on the cover of the newspaper. So, page 14 news would be, in comparison, very unimportant, or not at all noteworthy, novel or interesting. The irony is that a massive attack on the Pentagon would be expected to be all of those. Unless of course,...


32

There's a common wisecrack I've heard, and it goes something like this: Person A: I've been thinking... Person B: Oh, so that's why I smell smoke. Jokes like these are intended to compare the brain to some sort of mechanical device. Think too hard (the reasoning goes) and you might experience some sort of mechanical failure. This cartoon plays off ...


32

1: She dressed like a child The way she put her clothes on was child-like (perhaps she struggled with the buttons, etc.). 2: She dressed as a child The particular clothing she wore was intended to make it seem that she actually was a child. Note that in practice these are not hard-and-fast distinctions, but if forced to distinguish two different ...


30

Homo proponit, sed Deus disponit. This saying was originally written in Latin by Thomas a Kempis (1380- 1481) and was translated into different languages. People may make plans, but they cannot control the outcome of their plans. In other words it says that whatever man proposes as his objective to achieve by exercising his will power, efforts and ...


30

When someone does a mic check, they need to say something into the mic. People often say Mic check. One, two. One, two. Testing, testing. One, two. One, two. One two sounds like one too. The double meaning is that during a mic check, you got (have, hear, say) "one two" and, a dark side, you got (have) one too (also).


30

In this case, there is a very fashion-specific meaning for grounded. One occasional definition of the verb ground is to keep something on the ground or to prevent something from taking off/flying (see, for example, MacMillan Dictionary). Fashion writing sometimes plays on this meaning to describe some element of an outfit that keeps it from being too ...


29

As the other answer has described, this is sarcasm, but it doesn't really explain the meaning. First, eulogy has two meanings, it also means a praise about a person recently deceased (an obituary is only a notice of death, with a short biography and maybe facts about their life while a eulogy is a tribute to the late person). But it can also mean a tribute ...


29

The original quote has been so badly mangled by someone who simply failed to copy it out correctly in the first place. It has then been handed round the internet by others who simply never bothered to check if it was correct.. or even if it made any sense at all. Maybe they thought William Morris lived some time before Shakespeare & so "spoke funny", ...


28

In this sense, to ship two persons means to imagine that they are in a romantic relationship, or to desire that they are in a relationship. This normally applies to characters in a work of fiction (movie, novel, etc.), it would be unusual (but not impossible) to apply it to real people. The term originates from fandom. It was popularized in the Internet era,...


28

The bolded phrase in your question is expressed in an archaic negative - it is saying that Congress is prohibited from making any laws that promote an Established Religion (which is a phrase commonly used to mean the same thing as “an official church”). If the Constitution were first being written today, it might have been written as “...


28

You've got to scroll down further on your definition page to: prod-uce: noun [uncountable] food or other things that have been grown or produced on a farm to be sold You see that produce can also be a noun, so it means crops, food, or other things produced on a farm (and, might I add, elsewhere as well.) Therefore, the sentence means: The jetties ...


27

In your example, "a water" probably means a single serving of water. If we use the indefinite article a with a normally uncountable noun, we usually do it to mean one of two things: A certain kind of that noun. A single instance or serving of that noun, such as a packaged container of it from a shop or a serving at a restaurant. Here's an example for each ...


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