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"Turn aside" literally means to turn your head (or body) to one side, so as to either look away from something, or perhaps to face a new direction to look at something. "Turn aside from" something specifically means to look away from it. In a wider, figurative context, "turn aside from" can mean to abandon something, for example a course of action, either ...


3

I'm taking a guess at the context, but it mentions an "app" (computer application), and "adoption" of a software system means that someone or a company begins using it. The first people who buy into, or begin using an application are often called "early adopters". In this context, "merit" means the quality of being particularly good or worthy. What the ...


2

I do not know the song but I think if you consider it literally: He is playing a game of dominoes with his girlfriend but is pre-occupied with their failing relationship - his mind is on other things [gone astray]. As a result, he is not concentrating on the game and, as a result, he loses. It could also be a metaphor for their relationship - perhaps he ...


2

"Right" can be used as an adverb meaning 'exactly' or 'just'. If someone is right behind you, that person is close behind you. Likewise they could be right next to you, or right in front of you. right adverb (EXACTLY) exactly; just: I’m too busy to talk right now but I’ll get back to you later. He sat right behind me. I’ll be right back (= ...


2

Yes, it is referring to breaking a borrower's legs, or threatening to break them if the borrower doesn't pay back the loan on time. This is an obvious reference for most people familiar with American crime and movies about crime. Breaking somebody's legs is a punishment that the mafia is known for in the U.S. It's such a well known practice that it can be ...


2

The Moe character in The Simpsons TV cartoon series is a loan shark who is known to use violence, or the threat of it, including breaking legs, to encourage the repayment of loans. If we use a noun and the gerund form of a verb like that, it can imply a habitual or customary action, or that the action happened at a relevant time. Usually the noun and verb ...


2

The phrase here is "half as well", three words together functioning as an adverbial modifying has done. So the unabridged response from that person should read "I hope Jimmy has done half as well as I did." The last part "as I did" is omitted in the sentence. The "as... as" structure is used in English to show equality in comparison. So "half as... as" ...


2

It is the future tense (or perhaps more accurately a sentence that describes a future time with the modal verb "will"). You are fine. Is a simple present tense sentence (not continuous or passive), with a verb "are" (a form of "to be") and a adjective complement "fine" (This is "fine" the adjective meaning "good", not the noun meaning "fee or charge"). ...


2

No, they do not mean or imply the same thing. It is a sporting reference often used as an analogy. Professional sports tournaments are normally organised into leagues, pitting similarly performing teams against one another. When a team reaches the very top of a league, they may be promoted to the next league up; likewise, when they hit the bottom, they may ...


1

It might be either possible or impossible: you can't tell from the words. Note that a new car is ambiguous: it might mean a brand-new car, or a second-hand car that you have just acquired.


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Yes "every time I am with him, I am thinking she is cheating on me" is also correct. Its hard to say that there is a "better" way to say this. But I'll give some alternative wordings that mean the same thing. Thoughts of her infidelity riddle my mind whenever he draws near. His presence always makes me wonder if she is cheating on me. I can't ...


1

What here means "the thing which" and it doesn't make sense if we do such a swap in the original sentence: Yet the thing which best protected privacy... It does make sense; that is an understandable sentence. I suspect that the problem here might be the "yet". In this sentence it functions the same way that "however" or "nevertheless" or "but"; it is ...


1

As I understand it, Kahneman is pointing out that we have no direct contact with anyone else's consciousness. Instead, we form a belief about another individual's consciousness based on that person's behaviour - his/her actions and reactions, statements and responses. In the age of artificial intelligence, we could form a similar belief about the level of ...


1

When writing an academic paper, it's common to include references to other works that you have used to support your own work. These could be referred to as resources, and I'd imagine that "theoretical resources" means works that discuss theories pertaining to what you are writing about/researching. It may not just refer to works in this context, but also to ...


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Like you said in your comment, it does mean the children move away from books without pictures. The preposition should help you. "From" indicates a starting point, a source. So if they're moving away from books (or "turning aside from"), it means they stop reading those books (or don't want to). "To" indicates direction, so it's directed to books, they're ...


1

There is no simple rule for inventory turnover, except that a high ratio is preferable provided inventory is adequate to meet demand. provided: conj also provided that used to say that something will only be possible if something else happens or is done = providing  He can come with us, provided he pays for his own meals. The last "is" is ...


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so that introduces a clause that is a direct consequence of the preceding clause. here is the same concept described in a different sentence structure. Person X feels that they are more important than other people. Because they think that they are more important than other people, they think that it is OK to be rude to them or not consider them. The ...


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