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4

This usage of too is an example of understatement. It occurs only with verbs in the negative. My mother wasn't too pleased about the mess in the kitchen. Variants with the same meaning are to be "none too pleased" and not to be "any too pleased."


2

"Too" in this sentence is being used as "very". This is one of the meanings that "too" can have in a sentence, functioning as an adverb. In this sentence, it is clear that the subject of the sentence is not very appreciative of the car - the sentence is also correct without "too", but a little less idiomatic.


1

With ‘each other’ the sentence could mean that every pair of things has a link; with ‘one another’ it could mean only that each thing has a link with some other thing. But where this distinction is intended I would expect it to be worded more explicitly.


1

In this context, the verb 'to pace' is used in the meaning of 'setting/regulating the pace of' her (running), so it works as a transitive verb (meaning 3 here: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pace ) with the direct object her (as opposed to the first instance of 'her' as a possessive pronoun).


1

The word 'coolth' has been in use since the 1500s, meaning, essentially, the opposite of 'warmth', but, since the 1960s, has had a humorous, informal meaning of 'the quality of being relaxed, assured, or sophisticated in demeanour or style', that is, of being 'cool' in the 'hip' sense. The sentence is saying that the film (or rather, its maker) has mistaken ...


1

Philosopher Emanuel Swedenborg was much concerned with identifying "correspondences" (parallels) across different areas (religion, science, sociology,...) that might allow principles established in one field of human endeavor / thought to be usefully employed to gain a better understanding of other areas. The last sentence means Someone like Swedenborg (...


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