3

I think the term 'bragging rights' is pretty common and most native English speakers would know what you mean. Playing for bragging rights means that the only thing the winner will get out of winning, is to say to everyone that they won. They are playing for the right to talk highly about their winning.


3

The first talks about what kind of car "he" drives. It states that "he" habitually/usually drives a taxi car. "He" may or may not be picking up passengers and making money. Since taxi driver is a progression, like bus driver or dog walker, the second describes his profession. Someone could be driving a taxi and not work as a taxi driver, and therefore it ...


2

You're exactly correct. "it" means "getting to the kitchen" It's exactly the same in meaning as "Because getting to the kitchen is a pain in the ass and I don't want to come back here." Sentence 3 is ungrammatical. Be aware: a) this is very informal: "You trying to make your heart explode?" instead of standard English: "Are you trying ...", b) you wouldn'...


2

Yes, you are right about the meaning of the construction "too [adj.] to [something]". The pattern in your quoted sentence might look like that construction, but in this case, the phrase "to stress her out" has a different function in the sentence. "Too" can also be used by itself as a simple adverb modifying an adjective. That is the way it is used here. ...


2

All of these forms will be often heard (and read) and may be created by fluent and native speakers. None of them can now really be called incorrect. Strictly speaking "like" is a simple comparison usually followed by a noun or pronoun. "As" or "as if" is a conjunction and is normally followed by a subject and a verb although often one is elided. This ...


2

I think you are over-intrpreting. He called the Fun Zone, asking to meet the guys from the video. is a perfectly natural expression, and similar constructions are frequently used by fluent speakers. It is obvious that he asked during the call, so there is no need to interpret the grammar as a secondary clue to sequence. One could just as well write: ...


2

The present participle must relate to the subject of both verbs, i.e. "He called...and he asked...". In your compound sentence there is a participle construction in place of co-ordinate clause. After dropping the co-ordinative conjunction "and" we have "He called..., asking...". And both actions are simultaneous. He couldn't have asked anything having hung ...


2

Yes, "half-assed" is usually an adjective, but here it is being used as a verb. The meaning is "You did a half-assed job of getting the phone back" or, less colloquially, "You approached the task of getting the phone back with insufficient diligence and/or competence." Though somewhat unusual, this usage is common enough to have been used on this tank top ...


2

"Gets me going" can work in the sense of getting you excited about doing something, but it's imprecise. It can also mean "makes me mad" or "wakes me up" or a number of other interpretations. I would recommend "Interacting with other people, that's what I enjoy" or "That's what motivates me."


2

My initial answer would be "come out of" as in: you will come out of that battle a broken man This agrees with the dictionary definition #5 to rise, as from an ... unfortunate state ...


1

"All item" means that you have one item and all its' elements as the whole thing, whereas "all items" means that you have a lot of items and you mention not only one of them, but all amount of them. I'd rather use "all items", thus it means "all products".


1

This is not a common usage. But using nouns as verbs, (verbing nouns) particularly in informal speech, is generally common. Certainly the meaning here is clear and would be understood by any fluent speaker.


1

Yes your sentences 1 and 2 have identical meanings. In general "X is only A because Z" and "X is A only because Z" will have identical meanings. The exception will be when "only A" forms a distinct term, usually when A is some sort of level in a ranking system. For example: This group are only novices because they have not learned how to perform ...


1

Such constructions are perfectly acceptable, and not limited to highly informal speech. Nor need they be internally illogical. This is as serious a problem as I have ever had. This is as complex a system as I have ever designed. Presumably I have had problems of various sizes, and designed systems of various complexities (in fact, i have). So the ...


1

Presumably your point is that in both cases, logic tells you that a person is either in one state (eg 'in sync') or not. That ought to mean that the person's state cannot be compared in that respect with another person. That other person cannot be more or less 'in sync'; they are either 'in sync' or not. Your logic is impeccable. In formal writing you ...


1

It's a question of focus. I write novels Describes something I do I am a novelist Describes something I am When you say what you are, you are describing things which you consider to define you, and one of the most common is to describe your profession. Obviously the implication is that a writer writes, a novelist writes novels etc. We can make ...


1

Of the three examples you give, "keep your chin up" is the only one which really means to be positive. "Keep your head up" makes sense as an instruction, but is not particularly an idiom. A hairdresser might ask you to keep your head up so he can cut your hair properly. "Keep your chin up" is a popular idiom, and the inference is that your head is bowed ...


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