78

From the sentence alone, it could mean either #1 or #2; there is no way to tell without context. #1 would be the more common meaning of this construction, but #2 is perfectly proper. In this case, the previous paragraph makes it clear that Tom was happy (the term "boisterously" is used), and that Daisy and Gatsby were not. Therefore, #1 was intended. ...


40

Both usages are now valid. It is possible for a verb to develop meanings and, in particular, it can develop an intransitive sense from a transitive one. If you went back and talked to people in the 1940s, then "compile" didn't have anything to do with electronic computers. It just meant "assemble information" In the 1950s and 60s the meaning "convert ...


28

I haven't watched the episode in question, but I'm pretty sure you misheard the quote and that Phil actually says: Bulldog drool courses through his jowls! "Bulldog drool" means the drool (or saliva) of a bulldog, which is a breed of dog. It is also common in many schools and universities to use that school's mascot as a demonym, so that "a Bulldog" is a ...


27

This seems to be a mistake. The original documentation, from 2013, reads: The World Wide Web was built over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). A User Agent, like a web browser, uses HTTP to request a HTML document. The browser then formats and displays the document to its user. HTTP is used to ...


27

No she bludgering well won't! From what I understand, a bludger is a kind of ball in the wizarding world. However, here, bludgering looks like a euphemism/minced oath for bloody: → No she bloody well won't! Bloody well is an idiom: bloody well idiom Definition of bloody well British, informal + sometimes offensive —used before a ...


20

The ambiguity of sleeping with being a euphemism for sex is often the cause of humour, confusion, or embarrassment for English speakers. This Quora discussion gives a brief history of this usage in English, which goes back to the tenth century. I can't speak to why Google Translate doesn't offer more subtle translations in this case, but I can help with ...


18

Socially this is awkward. It is not common to "ask to be friends". If you don't know someone's name, you can't know that you want to be friends. Instead, you introduce yourself, talk about things that interest you both, and if you get along you might arrange to meet again later. If you tell someone your name it is natural for them to tell you theirs (so ...


18

I think the easiest way to phrase this would be "I stayed with". For instance, if you shared a room with your father at a hotel, you can say "I stayed with my dad at the hotel" or "I stayed in a room with my dad". "I shared a room with my father" is also pretty unambiguously platonic.The details of who slept in what bed are probably not necessary to get your ...


16

The text you highlighted contains two very common idioms: That [x] of his. Kept quiet. When people say "that [x] of his/yours", it is usually said disparagingly. For example: That dog of yours kept me awake all night with its barking. Instead of saying "your dog", the inference is that the dog isn't even worth naming or referring to properly, hence "...


11

No, "nakedly" is not commonly used in this sense. It can be used "obviously (and unpleasantly)". Cambridge gives the example sentence: This is a nakedly racist organisation. Meaning that they do not try to hide this fact. It is possible to use "naked" adverbially (or as a predicate adjective, or a appositive adjective, modifying "she"): She went ...


10

Note: I gave this answer before it was edited to provide additional context. At the time, the only phrase provided was: Daisy looked at Tom frowning. It's ambiguous and could be interpreted either way. To make it explicit, one way or the other, you could do the following (the list is not exhaustive): 1a. Daisy, frowning, looked at Tom. 1b. Daisy ...


9

I think the accepted answer here is actually incorrect. It seems much more likely that this quote is referring to the fact that barbers commonly practised medicine in the middle ages: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barber_surgeon. So the sentence would indicate to me that the person in question has more medical knowledge than a "mere" barber would have, ...


9

“Can we know each other?” is a weird-sounding question; don’t ask it. It sounds like it has the meaning “Is it possible we know each other?” or “Are we allowed to know each other?” - neither of which is what you mean to ask. “Can we get to know each other?” is a normal question that someone could ask; the meaning is what you think it is. But I agree with ...


9

To want one's bread buttered on both sides is a mainly British English idiom meaning to want to benefit or profit from two opposite or contradictory things, or to want to achieve or gain something without payment or effort, e.g. "Young people these days want their bread buttered on both sides - they want high paying jobs, but they aren't prepared to work for ...


9

The marked phrase is a sentence fragment. You shouldn't be troubled to find it in a script, as it happens frequently in speech. People don't always speak in complete sentences. (Know what I mean?) The simplest fix would be to simply add a predicate to the fragment, making it a complete sentence: My dreams are coming true. You and me are saving my lady ...


9

It is offering two quite different possible reasons for the piles of furniture: Stowed away to hide the evidence of mishandled magic or Hidden by castle-proud house-elves. Castle-proud is not a common expression, but it is a deliberate variant on the idiom house-proud. It implies that the house-elves like their castles to look their best, so have hidden ...


9

“Got it?” could be a question about whether a physical object has been obtained. Ex.: I hand the coat to you. You’ve got it. It could also be asking whether you understand something that has already happened. Ex.: You explained to me how to get to the library. I got it. “Get it?” might be a question about understanding something happening now. Ex.: I ...


8

"Turn aside" literally means to turn your head (or body) to one side, so as to either look away from something, or perhaps to face a new direction to look at something. "Turn aside from" something specifically means to look away from it. In a wider, figurative context, "turn aside from" can mean to abandon something, for example a course of action, either ...


7

This is a subtle one. You're right about "would" expressing willingness in the past (the past of "will" in a rather archaic sense of "be willing"). In the third case it might be literally that meaning: "they were unwilling/didn't want to give me my money back". But actually the sense of the first two, and possibly the third one as well, is something ...


6

It means increase, in the context of a quantity, but specifically to increase from a disappointingly low level, or surprisingly low level, or inconveniently low level. It's used when things are/were lower than you want/wanted them to be, basically. The "lagged behind our estimates" bit refers to the fact they thought it would increase, but it didn't. In ...


6

You could say: I'm not hungry. I'm full. We say that someone is "off (their) food", "have lost (their) appetite" or "don't have an appetite" when they are sick and the disease makes them not want to eat. She had a fever on Wednesday and was off her food all Thursday. But on Friday morning she had got her appetite back and ate a big cooked ...


6

In this sentence, "as" is a preposition. It means "In the role of": It forms a prepositional phrase which describes the role of the speaker. A person can have many roles in their life, and sometimes we want to emphasise that we are speaking with a particular expertise or perspective: As a parent, I am concerned about youth crime. In this case, the ...


6

'At best' is used here to say that, for campaigners, there are a range of possible outcomes, none good, from an 'emotional burst', and that being counterproductive is the least bad one. If you have an electric shock, you will be startled and surprised at best. Less good outcomes could be that you are slightly injured, badly injured, or, at worst, killed. ...


6

Although I agree with Em as to the meaning of the phrase, I would slightly amend the reasoning. A bludger is (of course) a black iron ball used in the wizarding sport of Quidditch. I would put forward to you that, rather than being a euphemism for the word "bloody", the word bludger is a swear word in itself (in the Wizarding world). Just like you might ...


6

The answer to your question is in. Typically at would precede the name of the stadium, as in: Side A are playing (against) side B at the New Stadium in today's game/match. In this context the preposition against is optional and is frequently omitted. https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/play-someone-instead-of-play-with-someone-or-play-against-...


5

"Filling up" a form was common in British English before about 1920. Still common in Indian English, but very obsolete elsewhere. British "fill in" and American "fill out" are common these days. British telegraph form (1890)


5

The suffix -ly is English often has similar meaning to the suffix -like, forming an adjective which means "having the same qualities as something" - for example motherly, childlike. So in the OP's sentence "she went to the street nakedly" could mean something like "she went to the street behaving in the same way as if she was naked" but that is probably not ...


5

Your version If current results hold, Man City will win [the] PL title. is perfectly grammatical, although I would prefer not to eliminate the "the", except in the space-limited context of the online display in the image. In fact I think it is better than the version with "would". There is uncertainty here in a sense, because no one yet knows if the ...


5

I have been given it on the condition that I do not pass it on. The person who gave the author the map made the author agree to a condition. The condition is that the author of the article cannot pass the map on to other people (give it to other people.) "On (the) condition that" is a set phrase meaning something happens only if a condition is met. ...


5

Go your own way is perfect. You can find thousands of examples of how people use it in English on Google Books. There is even a well-known song by Fleetwood Mac called "Go Your Own Way". Below is some explanation of why "Go your own way" is correct and the others are wrong or not as good. "Go your own way" In that sentence, "your own way" serves as an ...


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