78

From the sentence alone, it could mean either #1 or #2; there is no way to tell without context. #1 would be the more common meaning of this construction, but #2 is perfectly proper. In this case, the previous paragraph makes it clear that Tom was happy (the term "boisterously" is used), and that Daisy and Gatsby were not. Therefore, #1 was intended. ...


74

The "standard" spelling is Scary-looking thing, isn't he? I'm not entirely sure, but I believe this kind of spelling is called "eye dialect": Eye dialect is the use of nonstandard spelling for speech to draw attention to pronunciation. The term was coined by George Philip Krapp to refer to the literary technique of using nonstandard spelling that ...


65

Eton is a prestigious British public school for boys. As an aside - in the British education system, a public school is a privately run school that people pay (large) fees to attend - normally a fairly old one. They're called 'public schools' because when they were established, schools were generally owned and operated by groups like the church or trade ...


40

Both usages are now valid. It is possible for a verb to develop meanings and, in particular, it can develop an intransitive sense from a transitive one. If you went back and talked to people in the 1940s, then "compile" didn't have anything to do with electronic computers. It just meant "assemble information" In the 1950s and 60s the meaning "convert ...


34

Your conjecture is invalid. Follow takes an object and an optional locative complement designating the destination or path of movement. But it never has a causative sense: the subject does not cause the object to move.


30

In this case, there is a very fashion-specific meaning for grounded. One occasional definition of the verb ground is to keep something on the ground or to prevent something from taking off/flying (see, for example, MacMillan Dictionary). Fashion writing sometimes plays on this meaning to describe some element of an outfit that keeps it from being too ...


28

I haven't watched the episode in question, but I'm pretty sure you misheard the quote and that Phil actually says: Bulldog drool courses through his jowls! "Bulldog drool" means the drool (or saliva) of a bulldog, which is a breed of dog. It is also common in many schools and universities to use that school's mascot as a demonym, so that "a Bulldog" is a ...


24

To add on to Werrf's answer: "I was down for Eton" is a very British and a very posh way to say that the speaker was supposed to attend school at Eton when he was old enough. It immediately identifies the speaker as a particular nationality and social class (so much so that I can practically hear the speaker's accent in my mind as I read it). Americans and ...


22

The English "th" sound is relatively hard to pronounce, and in some English dialects it tends to be replaced by "f" or "v" at the start of words. This is common enough to have a technical name, th-fronting. In the OP's example "thing" is pronounced "fing". Clusters of consonants tend to be omitted or simplified in some dialects. and "t" in the middle of a ...


21

No, the second meaning does not work. The word follow cannot have that meaning. For contrast, let's look at a different sentence: A dog chased the man into the store. This sentence can have two different interpretations: The man caused the dog to enter the store. (The man chose to run into the store, and the dog ran in behind him.) The dog caused the ...


20

The ambiguity of sleeping with being a euphemism for sex is often the cause of humour, confusion, or embarrassment for English speakers. This Quora discussion gives a brief history of this usage in English, which goes back to the tenth century. I can't speak to why Google Translate doesn't offer more subtle translations in this case, but I can help with ...


18

It is idiomatic to speak of the person using their name, even when speaking of body parts, and especially when speaking of the face, which can be very expressive of the person's self and identity. Ron was bleeding. Ron had turned a sickly shade of green. Ron had turned a painful shade of red from lying out on the beach all day. "turned ... ...


18

Socially this is awkward. It is not common to "ask to be friends". If you don't know someone's name, you can't know that you want to be friends. Instead, you introduce yourself, talk about things that interest you both, and if you get along you might arrange to meet again later. If you tell someone your name it is natural for them to tell you theirs (so ...


18

I think the easiest way to phrase this would be "I stayed with". For instance, if you shared a room with your father at a hotel, you can say "I stayed with my dad at the hotel" or "I stayed in a room with my dad". "I shared a room with my father" is also pretty unambiguously platonic.The details of who slept in what bed are probably not necessary to get your ...


17

It simply means the building used to be beautiful previously. "once" means: at some time in the past; formerly. (from Google) So, "once-beautiful" means the building was beautiful previously and stands in contrast to its current state - "dirty, decrepit, and roofless". You can add "once" to almost any adjective, such as "once-important".


16

The text you highlighted contains two very common idioms: That [x] of his. Kept quiet. When people say "that [x] of his/yours", it is usually said disparagingly. For example: That dog of yours kept me awake all night with its barking. Instead of saying "your dog", the inference is that the dog isn't even worth naming or referring to properly, hence "...


13

That way of speaking is common in some English dialects like South and East London and northern areas around Manchester. "Fing" is just another way of saying "thing" equivalently "innee" is how some people say "isn't he" in some parts of England. I'd imagine it's to show the character's regional accent.


13

My understanding is that picks should be changed to picked. As for the philosophical content explicitly picked over in the film’s dialogue, it’s something for the viewer to digest. Now it sounds normal.


12

The phrase all along is often used in contexts where some duplicity or mistaken understanding is involved. You've been attending our meetings for weeks, and I thought you were interested in the birds that migrate to this area during the winter. But all along you just wanted to get to know Martha so you could ask her out on a date! This entire time, you ...


12

I don't know what you mean by the second sentence, it makes no sense to me. The sentence you are asking about means: a man walks into the store and is followed by a dog. The dog is walking behind the man.


11

I would say this is the figurative use of grounding to refer to something being reliable and practical. When a person has their feet on the ground, it means that they're sensible and focused on the immediate practicalities of the world around them, as opposed to someone who has their head in the clouds, constantly thinking about abstract ideas or fantasies. ...


11

No, "nakedly" is not commonly used in this sense. It can be used "obviously (and unpleasantly)". Cambridge gives the example sentence: This is a nakedly racist organisation. Meaning that they do not try to hide this fact. It is possible to use "naked" adverbially (or as a predicate adjective, or a appositive adjective, modifying "she"): She went ...


10

It is a proverb: The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence People are never satisfied with their own situation; they always think others have it better. (Dictionary.com) The idiom derives from a more recent version of an ancient proverb and exists in many variations. The Roman poet Ovid, for example, cited the proverb “ferilor seges ...


10

Note: I gave this answer before it was edited to provide additional context. At the time, the only phrase provided was: Daisy looked at Tom frowning. It's ambiguous and could be interpreted either way. To make it explicit, one way or the other, you could do the following (the list is not exhaustive): 1a. Daisy, frowning, looked at Tom. 1b. Daisy ...


9

I think the accepted answer here is actually incorrect. It seems much more likely that this quote is referring to the fact that barbers commonly practised medicine in the middle ages: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barber_surgeon. So the sentence would indicate to me that the person in question has more medical knowledge than a "mere" barber would have, ...


9

To have one's name down for something means: to have one's name on some list for some purpose. It could be for anything that requires being part of a list. Either a list that anyone can be on (volunteering) or some type of elite list where some institution is making a choice about who to choose for some job, training, education, etc. Here, Eton is an elite ...


9

You are correct that your second sentence "sounds very weird". That is because it makes no sense. It seems to suggest that the man somehow got into the store (was allowed to enter) by "the following of a dog" (because he was followed by a dog), which is just plain crazy, unless the shop only allows humans to enter if a dog goes in after them. Maybe you mean "...


9

“Can we know each other?” is a weird-sounding question; don’t ask it. It sounds like it has the meaning “Is it possible we know each other?” or “Are we allowed to know each other?” - neither of which is what you mean to ask. “Can we get to know each other?” is a normal question that someone could ask; the meaning is what you think it is. But I agree with ...


9

To want one's bread buttered on both sides is a mainly British English idiom meaning to want to benefit or profit from two opposite or contradictory things, or to want to achieve or gain something without payment or effort, e.g. "Young people these days want their bread buttered on both sides - they want high paying jobs, but they aren't prepared to work for ...


9

The marked phrase is a sentence fragment. You shouldn't be troubled to find it in a script, as it happens frequently in speech. People don't always speak in complete sentences. (Know what I mean?) The simplest fix would be to simply add a predicate to the fragment, making it a complete sentence: My dreams are coming true. You and me are saving my lady ...


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