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7 votes

How to understand we could all see our way past thinking…

Quite the reverse. She says that we should not think that love stories are less valuable than tragedies. Critics should find a way of metaphorically going past (and leaving behind) the common idea ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 57.1k
1 vote
Accepted

Nursery Rhymes message :

You're missing a very commonly added second verse, which provides the 'positive' message, I guess - Jack went to his cosy home and got better using the helpful 'medication' available there: Jack and ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
5 votes

How to understand we could all see our way past thinking…

Here, by “see our way past” she means go beyond. She’s saying that love and associated feelings are no less weighty than more negative emotions are, and so we shouldn’t allow our thinking to be ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Difference between "the number of people you would have thought" OR "the number of people you would think"?

The cited quotation originated in extemporaneous speech, not in edited writing, so it's important to recognize at the outset that we are not dealing here with what the poster describes as "the ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
0 votes

"Life really is short"

Both are correct English utterances in terms of their syntax. So there's not really a difference in meaning but they'd be used in different circumstances. There are a lot of existing questions on ...
Nadeem Learning Center -Online's user avatar
0 votes

How "growing and preparing pineapples and pineapple products" should be read?

No, grow is only for the pineapples. The sentence isn’t well written although it should be understood. It’s better to say The diagram below shows the process of growing pineapples and preparing ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Poetic construction - phrases placement

In the early 20th century the influential "modernist" movement had as one of its tenets the view that the syntax of poetry should be closer to that of everyday speech. So, while it is true ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
-1 votes

Poetic construction - phrases placement

Anything is allowed in poetry! Forgive me if we get a little philosophical. What is language? What is the point of it? The point of language is communication. I have a thought, and I want you to know ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
7 votes
Accepted

We are getting someplace/somewhere

To make a few corrections: He asked, "Did you send the email?" I replied, "Yes, a long time ago." Then he replied, "Now we're getting somewhere." It means that, since you ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,924
3 votes

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

Unfortunately, you're almost certainly wrong. "Whether" is an interrogative subordinator/complementiser that introduces a clause. I.e., [whether + noun + verb phrase]. This is the ...
ishtar's user avatar
  • 626
1 vote

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

I think you may have misunderstood the meaning of the sentence. Hence, the performer’s level of skill and the complexity of the skill itself will determine whether an audience helps or hinders ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
-3 votes

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

It is not incorrect, though might have an extra comma for clarity, but it is conveying a different meaning and very few people would phrase something like that. "Hence, the performer’s level of ...
Pete Kirkham's user avatar
  • 1,007
0 votes

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

You're attempting to use "whether" in a manner that manipulates its quality as a particle but ignores its meaning. "Whether" almost always introduces a binary. That binary can be ...
Felix's user avatar
  • 21
13 votes

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

Sorry, your sentence isn't grammatically valid. It's not even a sentence! The original was quite complex, so let's demonstrate with something simpler. This light and this switch show whether the ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
0 votes

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

The original sentence asserts that an audience may either help or hinder [an entertainer's] performance. Which of those two possibilities occurs depends on two factors... X: the performer’s level of ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

"That" and its relevance

Yes and no. It makes a slight difference but the end result is the same. The point of "that" is that it specifies. Let's take a simpler situation. Let's say I take you to buy a cupcake out ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
2 votes

How should I understand the following italic and bold part?

"Proper" has several meanings and usages. For whatever reason, with this particular usage, it's common to put it after the noun it modifies. It's covered by definition 6 in Merriam-Webster: ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
0 votes

Should I use type or type of in this sentence

criminal-type mentality versus criminal type of mentality OR criminal kind of mentality
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.9k
4 votes

Does "*some of the town council*" mean the same as "*some of the **members** of the town council*"?

This is normal English. Some takes this meaning (near the last few pages): PRONOUN 6. certain persons, individuals, instances, etc., not specified Some think he is dead Similar constructions with some ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What does this phrase from Milton mean?

John Milton lived in the 1600s, when English spelling conventions were not as standardized as they are now. Here is the same quote, but with modern spellings: "Books," says Milton, "do ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
3 votes

What does this phrase from Milton mean?

That's quite a chunk of old language! First, recognize that the spelling doesn't match what's used today. Here's a version using modern standardized spelling: Books do preserve, as in a vial, the ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
0 votes

Can we say "I'm going to the bathroom" to mean "I'm going to take a shower / bath"?

Yes, you can, though people may not know you are intending to take a shower or bath unless you are at home. If you are in public, people may assume you are either using the toilet appliance, washing ...
Megas's user avatar
  • 313
5 votes

What does this quote from "Mr. Dooley" mean?

The author of that remark lived most of his life in the 19th century. His English is somewhat old fashioned. Consider this bit of hype about a (fictitious) new audio technology: Our Super Duper ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
6 votes
Accepted

What does this quote from "Mr. Dooley" mean?

It just means that reading is a good way of resting the mind. The fictional Mr Dooley claims that the only better way of resting is to go to bed! If you are reading an enjoyable book, you are 'in' ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 57.1k
1 vote

Meaning "the waiter grinning in practiced collusion..."

Background Cultural Knowledge In the US, there is a common cultural idea that dessert (sweets after dinner) is decadent, luxurious, and maybe a bit naughty. Many Americans eat dessert regularly, but ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

"it would be" in reference to something that someone else did or does

Let's acknowledge first that conditionals are confusing. And all the taxonomy of first, second, zero, implicit, explicit et cetera is a bit artificial. These categories are "descriptive, not ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k

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