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Sentence 2 is incorrect and not grammatical English. There are two finite verbs for the subject "messages", and that is not allowed. The first problem is "messages are communicating". A message can't communicate, only people can communicate. When the grammar is wrong, we can often understand the meaning from the rest of the sentence. But here the meaning ...


1

According to The Free Dictionary, in this context applies definition #5: otherwise, adj: 5. of a different kind. Consequently, your example sentence would be: You have your own particular, specific problems — financial, intimate, psychological, and of a different kind.


2

Idiomatically, a person can get ready (i.e. for something), but an order cannot. Confusingly, both a person and an order can be ready, but the person is ready because they prepared themselves, while an order is ready because someone or something prepared it. As such: You can pay when the order gets ready No, use is: "You can pay when the ...


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In the second expression "gets" can be used. However "gets" can't be used in the third example. There is a problem with the use of "when" in the second example. It suggests you strongly believe that the order will be cancelled; this seems unlikely. Use "if" instead. The last sentence is wrong. "get ready" is a phrase. It means "prepare oneself", and doesn'...


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First, this is not one of the special contexts where you can use a singular countable noun without an article, so you need "the character". Secondly, when you are specifying something with a general term and a name, the pattern "the X of [name]" is used only for some geographical items: most commonly towns, cities, islands; for example "The city of Moscow",...


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Yes, if you created another problem by trying to solve one problem, then the problem you created was caused by you trying to solve the one problem. Your analysis is good, but you've arrived at these conclusions by substituting a group of words you understand well with a group of words you don't quite understand. The other problem you created while trying ...


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When your source uses the expression "dual sin", it means that the sin has a "dual" nature, in other words the sin is composed of two parts. The section of the sentence following the colon identifies (in turn) each part of the sin. It could have been written this way: "... dual sin: The sin of being furious at his mother for not satisfying him; and the ...


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Don't because they are general, timeless statements, for which we usually use the the present simple. "You" is here an indefinite pronoun, not the second person (addressee).


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It seems that some of your confusion may be due to the fact that the last few sentences contain some Old English, like "thy" and "doth", some unusual sentence structures, as well as line breaking in odd places (common in poetry). Thy thousand pinnacles and fretted spires Are lit with echoes and the lambent fires Of many companies of bells that ring ...


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According to the link this is from the Book of Lost Tales which means that it is a very early work of Tolkien's. I would describe it as "6 lines of verse"it is not a full sentence, nor is it a separate stanza or other separate section of the poem "The City of Present Sorrow" (Thank you Weather Vane for the link). The full sentence is 8 linbes or verse, ...


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That part of the stanza can be seen as two sentences, broken by the semicolon. As one sentence the first can be clarified with some phrasing and added words. Thy thousand pinnacles / and fretted spires / are lit with / echoes and lambent fires / of many companies of bells that ring / rousing pale visions of majestic days / [which] the windy years have ...


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This is a figure of speech used in some novels written in the 19th century (and possibly earlier). It simply means that the writer chooses not to specify the exact year -- the year doesn't really matter -- but it was sometime in the 1700s. "The year of grace" is a variation on "The year of our Lord", both of which are an English version of the Latin Anno ...


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The style here is rather out of date. Except as a period piece, no one writes like that currently. In fact, even when Treasure Island was first published in 1881, the style was old fashioned, because it was describing events set more than one hundred years before it was published, and the author attempted to evoke that period by his style. "I take up may ...


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It means "I am starting to write in a year which I am not specifying which is 17xx", ie at some point in the 18th century. It was common to omit details, such as calling a person "P----" instead of the full name. It's interesting to note that in Edgar Allen Poe's The Murders in the Rue Morgue, which was published in 1841, we see the same form: "Residing in ...


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"Gets me going" can work in the sense of getting you excited about doing something, but it's imprecise. It can also mean "makes me mad" or "wakes me up" or a number of other interpretations. I would recommend "Interacting with other people, that's what I enjoy" or "That's what motivates me."


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My initial answer would be "come out of" as in: you will come out of that battle a broken man This agrees with the dictionary definition #5 to rise, as from an ... unfortunate state ...


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Yes, you can rewrite the sentence like you have. The original sentence in the comic book, while correct, is slang and is really only ever used in conversation. As the comic book is likely trying to imitate spoken language, the sentence structure that the writers used is appropriate.


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It's a question of focus. I write novels Describes something I do I am a novelist Describes something I am When you say what you are, you are describing things which you consider to define you, and one of the most common is to describe your profession. Obviously the implication is that a writer writes, a novelist writes novels etc. We can make ...


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I think the term 'bragging rights' is pretty common and most native English speakers would know what you mean. Playing for bragging rights means that the only thing the winner will get out of winning, is to say to everyone that they won. They are playing for the right to talk highly about their winning.


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"All item" means that you have one item and all its' elements as the whole thing, whereas "all items" means that you have a lot of items and you mention not only one of them, but all amount of them. I'd rather use "all items", thus it means "all products".


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"Why did she leave her car there?" This is a loaded question. It says something is true, and then asks a question about it. It doesn't just ask why, it' also says that "She left her car there." "Why would she leave her car there?" This question is hypothetical. It asks us to imagine a situation that may or may not be true. This question still makes ...


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It could mean the same thing, if you are asking it as a rhetorical question (that is, a question that is not meant to be answered, but it is assumed that the answer is evident and obvious). As one website says: A rhetorical question is asked just for effect, or to lay emphasis on some point being discussed, when no real answer is expected. A rhetorical ...


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You're exactly correct. "it" means "getting to the kitchen" It's exactly the same in meaning as "Because getting to the kitchen is a pain in the ass and I don't want to come back here." Sentence 3 is ungrammatical. Be aware: a) this is very informal: "You trying to make your heart explode?" instead of standard English: "Are you trying ...", b) you wouldn'...


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Your assumption is correct—and there are several ways that the sentence could be reworded. The simplest way of looking at it is in the form of basic elision (the wording that has been left out): He could tell she was someone of importance. How important [she was] would give him the knowledge he needed to take control of the situation.


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You can certainly say, "now I'm a different being," but it might be misunderstood (depending on what meaning you intend, of course). If you started out as a person, and you are still a person, but a different person, then I think you ought to follow FumbleFingers' advice and just say, "now I'm a different person." Making the creative choice to use a word ...


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Yes, you are right about the meaning of the construction "too [adj.] to [something]". The pattern in your quoted sentence might look like that construction, but in this case, the phrase "to stress her out" has a different function in the sentence. "Too" can also be used by itself as a simple adverb modifying an adjective. That is the way it is used here. ...


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3a and 4a seem more felicitous, because their contractions (I've and you've) sound more natural. "Like he is" and "Like I am" are both natural.


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All of these forms will be often heard (and read) and may be created by fluent and native speakers. None of them can now really be called incorrect. Strictly speaking "like" is a simple comparison usually followed by a noun or pronoun. "As" or "as if" is a conjunction and is normally followed by a subject and a verb although often one is elided. This ...


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Such constructions are perfectly acceptable, and not limited to highly informal speech. Nor need they be internally illogical. This is as serious a problem as I have ever had. This is as complex a system as I have ever designed. Presumably I have had problems of various sizes, and designed systems of various complexities (in fact, i have). So the ...


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Yes your sentences 1 and 2 have identical meanings. In general "X is only A because Z" and "X is A only because Z" will have identical meanings. The exception will be when "only A" forms a distinct term, usually when A is some sort of level in a ranking system. For example: This group are only novices because they have not learned how to perform ...


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Presumably your point is that in both cases, logic tells you that a person is either in one state (eg 'in sync') or not. That ought to mean that the person's state cannot be compared in that respect with another person. That other person cannot be more or less 'in sync'; they are either 'in sync' or not. Your logic is impeccable. In formal writing you ...


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The word you seem to have missed in the question is first: Rocket as war weapons were first invented or used by ________? Note: It doesn't ask who first invented rockets, or who used them as a war weapon. The question asks, "Who first used it as a war weapon?" The answer to this question can be found in the third sentence of the second paragraph: ...


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Here's a present (gift): It is his dubious distinction to have proved what nobody would think of denying, that Romero at the age of sixty-four writes with all the characteristics of ____. a dubious distinction= something that makes you noticeable that is not something that is necessarily a good or positive thing. to prove something no one would think of ...


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Of the three examples you give, "keep your chin up" is the only one which really means to be positive. "Keep your head up" makes sense as an instruction, but is not particularly an idiom. A hairdresser might ask you to keep your head up so he can cut your hair properly. "Keep your chin up" is a popular idiom, and the inference is that your head is bowed ...


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The first talks about what kind of car "he" drives. It states that "he" habitually/usually drives a taxi car. "He" may or may not be picking up passengers and making money. Since taxi driver is a progression, like bus driver or dog walker, the second describes his profession. Someone could be driving a taxi and not work as a taxi driver, and therefore it ...


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I think you are over-intrpreting. He called the Fun Zone, asking to meet the guys from the video. is a perfectly natural expression, and similar constructions are frequently used by fluent speakers. It is obvious that he asked during the call, so there is no need to interpret the grammar as a secondary clue to sequence. One could just as well write: ...


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The present participle must relate to the subject of both verbs, i.e. "He called...and he asked...". In your compound sentence there is a participle construction in place of co-ordinate clause. After dropping the co-ordinative conjunction "and" we have "He called..., asking...". And both actions are simultaneous. He couldn't have asked anything having hung ...


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Yes, "half-assed" is usually an adjective, but here it is being used as a verb. The meaning is "You did a half-assed job of getting the phone back" or, less colloquially, "You approached the task of getting the phone back with insufficient diligence and/or competence." Though somewhat unusual, this usage is common enough to have been used on this tank top ...


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This is not a common usage. But using nouns as verbs, (verbing nouns) particularly in informal speech, is generally common. Certainly the meaning here is clear and would be understood by any fluent speaker.


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Yes, this is a common way to use the word. To put [one thing] over [another thing] Just means to consider the first thing as more important/prominent than the other. This can apply in a variety of contexts. Macmillan Dictionary summarises quite well. In your case: WHO rejects calls to move Olympics over Zika fears? Who considers [moving the ...


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Using thefreedictionary.com, over can be interchanged with "because of". So your assumption is correct.


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Yes. It is common, and it does mean because of or due to in those sentences.


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The phrase “there is no hurry” means that you are telling the other person the work is not urgent, they do not need to hurry, and they can “take their time”. (definition) You can also say “there is no rush”, “take your time”, or “don’t rush.” You can say (informally), “No rush.” (This is a sentence fragment.) Cautions Using “no rush“ or “no hurry” in ...


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"Then" is used to show that one event comes after another. Apparently, choosing a character to play as in this game is a two-stage process: Choose a hero. Mix and match their weapons and gear. The earlier part of the sentence is something of an apology that you cannot "create" your own character from the ground up, but goes on to explain that, while you ...


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"As of yet" does not exist as an English expression. It seems to be a blend of "as yet" and "as of now". (I would not say "as of now" in any context, but many people do). "As yet" means "so far", "up to now". "Yet" can also mean "so far", "up to now" in some contexts, but cannot stand first in a clause with this meaning, because in that position another ...


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Less so is a “contextual comparative” and it modifies another adjective indicating a lesser degree of the quality in question. In your context it refers to the adjective “quiet”.


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The phrase "Engineers find problems to solutions" is mostly sensible. It is clear that it comes from the normal phrase of "... find solutions to problems", which is what makes it kind of humorous. However typically problems are found in something. Therefore a more natural way to say this is: Engineers find problems in solutions. This keeps a similar ...


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Gaunt is claiming that the ministry wizard should give him more respect because all his family are pure blood wizards, for many generations. He isn't speaking in complete sentences (he is uneducated and in-bred) but he exclaims, (My family is made of many) generations of pure-bloods. All my ancestors were wizards (no muggles or squibs). (There are more ...


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If you say that something is true, or applies, in principle, you are saying that provisionally based on what you know about it so far. You agree in general but have not yet considered the details. No decision has been made. In principle (1) As a general idea or plan, although the details are not yet established. ‘the government agreed in ...


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There are two idiomatic constructions here: "It is better" + infinitive, e.g. It is better to be safe than sorry. "You are better off" + present participle, e.g. You are better off eating just a small snack than hurrying a main meal. (And you can substitute any other personal pronoun in the second form - I, he, she, we, etc.) So sentences 1, 3, 5, ...


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