New answers tagged

2

It is the future tense (or perhaps more accurately a sentence that describes a future time with the modal verb "will"). You are fine. Is a simple present tense sentence (not continuous or passive), with a verb "are" (a form of "to be") and a adjective complement "fine" (This is "fine" the adjective meaning "good", not the noun meaning "fee or charge"). ...


2

No, they do not mean or imply the same thing. It is a sporting reference often used as an analogy. Professional sports tournaments are normally organised into leagues, pitting similarly performing teams against one another. When a team reaches the very top of a league, they may be promoted to the next league up; likewise, when they hit the bottom, they may ...


3

I'm taking a guess at the context, but it mentions an "app" (computer application), and "adoption" of a software system means that someone or a company begins using it. The first people who buy into, or begin using an application are often called "early adopters". In this context, "merit" means the quality of being particularly good or worthy. What the ...


2

"Right" can be used as an adverb meaning 'exactly' or 'just'. If someone is right behind you, that person is close behind you. Likewise they could be right next to you, or right in front of you. right adverb (EXACTLY) exactly; just: I’m too busy to talk right now but I’ll get back to you later. He sat right behind me. I’ll be right back (= ...


-1

Keep behind me means the same as stay behind me, behind my back. "Right" is used here as an adverb with the meaning "exactly". I see a big house right in front of me (exactly in front of me). We could do it right now (without any delay) or wait for another hour. Using "right" just emphasizes that you want a person exactly behind you and not a step ...


2

Yes, it is referring to breaking a borrower's legs, or threatening to break them if the borrower doesn't pay back the loan on time. This is an obvious reference for most people familiar with American crime and movies about crime. Breaking somebody's legs is a punishment that the mafia is known for in the U.S. It's such a well known practice that it can be ...


2

The Moe character in The Simpsons TV cartoon series is a loan shark who is known to use violence, or the threat of it, including breaking legs, to encourage the repayment of loans. If we use a noun and the gerund form of a verb like that, it can imply a habitual or customary action, or that the action happened at a relevant time. Usually the noun and verb ...


0

The first two are not particular correct or idiomatic. The third one: Have you checked him for your stolen chain? This sounds as though you will be searching his person for a stolen chain, which doesn’t sound like what you’re asking. It sounds like you’d want something like: Have you checked if he knows where your [stolen] chain is? Have you ...


1

When writing an academic paper, it's common to include references to other works that you have used to support your own work. These could be referred to as resources, and I'd imagine that "theoretical resources" means works that discuss theories pertaining to what you are writing about/researching. It may not just refer to works in this context, but also to ...


0

Basic form: I wanted so much to be able to say... This can be expressed by: I would have given anything to be able to say... This, in turn, can be transformed into a question: What would I not have given to be able to say... To sum up, I think the author just wanted very much to be able to answer the question he was asked.


0

What would I not have given to be able to ... means I would have given anything to be able to ... or, more simply, I wished intensely that I was able to ... What did he wish that he was able to do To say correctly, completely, and confidently a rule about participles, which rule he found difficult to recall Parsing in detail To say that ...


0

What would I not have given... This is a statement of feeling as though he would have given/sacrificed/exchanged anything for something else, in this case the ability to recite the rule. Feeling he would have given anything, he challenges the reader, in the form of a question, to think of something (the “what”) that he would not have been willing to give. ...


0

"The balance of your account stands at $400,000" It isn't stated but it is implied that this is the amount of money that B owes to A. It is unusual to give money to a company in advance and build up lots of credit with a company. It is quite common to receive a product but not pay the invoice immediately. "We hope you will be able to reduce it" Here "it"...


0

but as the balance of your account now stands at over USD400,000, we hope you will be able to reduce it before we grant credit for further supplies. So B owes A money: $400,000 Before A can supply B with more goods in credit, A needs B to pay half of the money B owes them. Why does A ask for B to 'reduce' B's account balance?! That is because B owes ...


0

You can learn English even without taking English courses. If I'm asked this, I'd include my time with and without courses. I think if you just answer "5 years", people would just think you've learnt English for 5 years, with or without courses. You an also explicitly say "I've been studying English for 5 years at school A" to talk about just that one school....


0

Does this mean: many children turn to books without pictures? Or many children turn to books with pictures? What the original sentence means is that many children don't like books without pictures - this means many children like books with pictures (e.g., comics). As children grow older, they lose interest in books without pictures. Note that "turn to" is ...


1

Like you said in your comment, it does mean the children move away from books without pictures. The preposition should help you. "From" indicates a starting point, a source. So if they're moving away from books (or "turning aside from"), it means they stop reading those books (or don't want to). "To" indicates direction, so it's directed to books, they're ...


8

"Turn aside" literally means to turn your head (or body) to one side, so as to either look away from something, or perhaps to face a new direction to look at something. "Turn aside from" something specifically means to look away from it. In a wider, figurative context, "turn aside from" can mean to abandon something, for example a course of action, either ...


0

It is an idiom: to go without (something). Try searching for go without, not do without. Examples: A week is a long time to go without eating. I have never gone so long without eating. How long can someone go without water? Your sentence means, "Gryffindors have been losing for a long time: their longest time ever."


0

To say that something turns out to be the case, you can use 'prove' followed by either: an adjective, or an infinitive verb and an adjective or noun. The tools proved useful. The new employee proved to be a fool. The car proved to have a flat tyre. Of your sentences, only the first is grammatical. The second uses the wrong verb form after 'proved' (must be ...


0

The screams, laughter and "wefies" (whatever that is supposed to be) are coming from the other people present. Parse this as: ... made her look like a vampire, she said, to [the sound of] screams, laughter...


1

There is no simple rule for inventory turnover, except that a high ratio is preferable provided inventory is adequate to meet demand. provided: conj also provided that used to say that something will only be possible if something else happens or is done = providing  He can come with us, provided he pays for his own meals. The last "is" is ...


1

so that introduces a clause that is a direct consequence of the preceding clause. here is the same concept described in a different sentence structure. Person X feels that they are more important than other people. Because they think that they are more important than other people, they think that it is OK to be rude to them or not consider them. The ...


0

Firstly the second sentence needs rearranging: Why would you have done that? I don't understand. The sentence: Why would you do that? I don't understand. This sentence asks why B would do something, and sort implies that B would do it again, as though it were a part of who he is. It's much more direct, i.e., directed at B as a person. Why would ...


2

I do not know the song but I think if you consider it literally: He is playing a game of dominoes with his girlfriend but is pre-occupied with their failing relationship - his mind is on other things [gone astray]. As a result, he is not concentrating on the game and, as a result, he loses. It could also be a metaphor for their relationship - perhaps he ...


1

"Experimental physicists don’t like theoretical physicists, because [...] they don’t really work at all." The joke is that theoretical physicists don't do any work. Usually the weekend is {Sat, Sun}. If you had a meeting on Saturday, you would spoil one weekend. But for theoretical physicists the weekend is {wed, thu, fri, sat, sun, mon, tue, wed}. So a ...


3

The second one is the right one: "Polite society is outraged by the picture". Semantically, it is impossible for an image to be outraged so your first option wouldn't work, but it's also an incorrect interpretation, syntactically.


1

This may help. Suppose the answer to a question is "Yes, they fought." This would have two different meanings for two different questions: Did Joe and Pete fight? Yes, they fought. Did Joe and Pete fight in the war? Yes, they fought. In the first case, Joe and Pete are understood to have fought each other. In the second case, they are understood to ...


1

All of the presented possibilities are possible and reading the sentence in isolation can only leave you to guess which one is correct. The standard implication for both sentences is that the two subjects are doing the action with each other. With surrounding context, however, other meanings could become more likely. There are also other words you could add ...


0

In your first block, example 2 is normal usage: "I can't hear what you are saying?" while example 1 would only be normal if you inserted a comma: "I can't hear, what are you saying?" Both have essentially the same meaning, which is largely "Speak up!" In your second block, it is the other way around: "Where are you going?" is normal usage, and I can't see ...


1

People here often grumble when a questioner hasn't done enough work on their own before asking us to help. But in your case I think you've done too much!! Bronte is doing something unusual here. Imagine you've been looking after a neighbour's child all morning and he has been driving you mad. When telling a friend about it later you might imitate the child'...


1

A "resolution" is a way of finishing a story in a satisfying way. The problems set up in the story are solved in the resolution. If a story is "dragged to a resolution" then reaching the resolution is difficult. "Conjuring out of nowhere" describes a magic trick where the magician creates something by magic. For example the magician might make a rabbit ...


2

It seems from your comment on Ronald Soles's post that your intended question is not about the specific subject being taken (i.e. French class or Math class), but about the level of schooling you are in, corresponding to how old you are and how long you have been in school. A quick Google search has confirmed that the Indian school system refers to its ...


1

Class here is taken to mean a particular group, year or level of students. So your first example What class are you studying does not work. It would be meaningful if you said that you were interested in beetles and someone asked you:What class (of beetles) are you studying. This is clearly not your intention. The other three examples are all possible but ...


0

I think none of the (current) other answers are correct. 'Got' is not always past tense. From what I understand, you ask for either the phrase 'Got it?' or 'Get it?' as a confirmation after saying/explaining something. In which case they are not part of a larger sentence and 'got' is not past tense. "I need that report today. Got it?" or "I need that ...


4

Get/got = to understand. [Do you] get it? Meaning: Do you understand what I am saying or explaining to you. Often expressed as: Get it? Present tense. Now, for this meaning at a present time, we also use: [Have you] got it? Like this: "Got it?" So both can be used to mean: understand something at a time in the present. So, the reason either one can be ...


0

You have to get the difference: Got - Past Tense. Get - Present Tense. For example: When you say "I got it", that means that you already got that thing - whereas "I get it" means that you get that thing now.


5

"Got" is the past tense of the verb, and "get" is the present tense. Except that the past tense is irregular (it is "got," not "getted") this works the same as for any other verb. Note that "to get it" has two different meanings: the literal meaning of "to have some physical object" and also the meaning of "to understand something".


3

"Animated" literally means "full of life or excitement; lively", but is also used to describe a process of making cartoons and the like, whereby inanimate things - for example, drawings, clay models etc - are given the appearance of moving, or being alive. "Madness" can mean crazy behaviour, or perhaps wild, chaotic activity. "Animated madness" therefore ...


2

Only difference between them is the time. Get is the present tense form while Got is the past tense form. -I get the tools. (I am moving to get it) Present -I got the tools. (I already got it) Past Also in the meaning of understanding something: -I get what you mean by that. (I understand it right now) Present -I got what you mean by that. (...


Top 50 recent answers are included