27

I cut the hose in half. I (and I think most people) would assume you were talking about doing what is represented in the first and third pictures if you said that. To describe, the second, I would say: I cut (or probably more commonly, split) the hose in half length-wise.


16

@sharken’s answer may be precise, but even as a native English speaker I would have to reach for a dictionary to be certain of the meaning of axial: I cut the hose along the longitudinal/axial plane. The initial question you pose is: How to describe exactly in what way this hose was cut? And as @KateBunting says in the comments, you can simply say ...


12

Both are acceptable, though the first one has connotations that might make it not work in this context. If someone says they "don't have a voice" in a matter, the implication is that this is a bad thing. The person being shut out of this conversation would probably phrase it that way, or someone who feels that their government or employer doesn't listen to ...


8

The expression used in bookkeeping is balance, employed as both a noun and transitive or intransitive verb to designate an equality of positive and negative values. His income and expenses are in balance. His income and expense balance. His income balances his expenses. He has balanced his income and expenses. If income and expenses do not balance,...


8

The water is cut off. For me, that sentence suggests a deliberate action. Living in the UK, this is such a rare event that I would probably feel the need to be explicit, e.g. "There's no water coming out of the taps." If this became a regular occurrence then I would say, "The water's off again."


7

If you need to explicitly tell the person their opinion is not wanted, you might use Thank you for your thoughts, but we need to decide this on our own. with emphasis on "we" and "our own", is a way of saying other opinions are not wanted or sought. You might also just say Thank you for your opinion/ideas, we will keep it in mind. and just ignore ...


7

As in the comments, His English has become [or "got", or "gotten" in American] rusty. or He's out of practice at [or "with"] English. If you want something more active, His English has gathered dust. or even (if you want to be more poetic but perhaps be harder to understand) His English has gathered moss. I personally ...


6

From Wiktionary: God works in mysterious ways The possible source of the expression is the Christian hymn titled "God Moves in a Mysterious Way" written in the late XVII century by William Cowper. From Wiktionary's entry for the above idiom, there are two synonyms: Every cloud has a silver lining (Hear it used in an old jazz song "Melancholy Baby"). ...


6

The person who didn't get the job might say: That's just my luck. An observer might say: Sorry; that's so unlucky.


6

As a practical matter, I'm assuming that the person shown is cutting out a part of the hose that has a leak, and splicing the two good pieces back together with a hose mender. So you wouldn't say "I cut the hose in the middle", because the leak might not be in the middle of the hose. You'd say "I cut out the leaking part, and spliced the hose back together"...


6

I like this question. Annoyingly, it's happened to us a few times recently. I naturally said: The hot water's off. And I think that if the cold water had also been absent, i.e. no water at all, I would have just said: The water's off. For some reason, cut off doesn't sound right to me, perhaps because I associate it with power/energy only.


5

The most common idiom for this is probably that the person is living beyond their means. For example: Signs You Are Living Beyond Your Means: "Living beyond your means is easy to do in a debt driven society. All we need to do to purchase an item these days is swipe a credit card and on we go to the next purchase. The days of using cash are numbered which ...


5

There are numerous ways to inform someone that you're using the restroom. Here are some brief ways. Occupied. That's the first thing that came to my mind. I think a more polite phrase would be One moment please. Some more causal ways would be Just a minute. (Note that this is not a literal minute, but a request or notice for an ...


5

Instead of ending the letter with these sentences, a correspondence reply letter usually start with these lines. "Thank you for taking the time to write this letter..." This is perfectly natural and a very commonly used sentence, used to start off a reply letter. "Thank you for taking the time and effort in writing this letter." This would be more ...


5

The problem with trying to answer a question like this is that informal English has literally hundreds, possibly thousands, of ways to express sympathy for a bad outcome by blaming it on a pattern of bad outcomes due to chance. This is made worse because (a) such informal phrases change relativly rapidly, and (b) they frequently employ irony to say one thing ...


5

Something can be split in half, for example a tree Something can be cut in half, for example an apple But you could also describe it as being spilt down the middle, because both sides of the apple are equal. For cylinder objects like hoses, tubes and pipes; in order to avoid any ambiguity say I cut the [object] in half OR in the middle I cut through ...


4

A common expression (where I'm from at least) used to describe a situation as you have described is: What goes around, comes around. In other words, what you do to others, whether good or bad, will come back around to you too.


4

You sentence is grammatically correct, but nobody would say that. Probably the most idiomatic way of saying this would be He has burned his bridges.


4

You can say almost anything you like, but obvious choices are things like "Occupied!" (to describe the state of the bathroom stall, which is occupied by you) or "Don't come in!" (the basic imperative). Or you can simply make some obvious noise to signal your presence, like grunting.


4

I think I was in a dead zone is a good option in this context. In my opinion, service is a commonly used word here. I think reception is also common. Coverage is possible, but I think it's not a common option. It sounds closer to the terms outline in your cell phone plan. A signal and a connection are also possible. Range is not really possibly by itself (...


4

I'll expand on my comment on the original question with a few other points to try to make this into a full-fledged answer. There are two possibilities, depending on what you're trying to mean with "hold in the hands": "To hold a child by the hand," or "to hold hands with a child." That means that the child's hand and your hand are intertwined, as in this ...


4

While Do I misunderstand something? is not wrong, it's not entirely natural either. More common expressions that express the same idea are the following: Did I misunderstand something? Am I misunderstanding something? What don't I understand?


4

I would probably just stick to "gotten rusty" in most contexts: His English has gotten rusty. (American) His English has got rusty. (British) The (slightly more formal) alternatives that sound the most natural to me would be: His English has deteriorated from years of disuse. His English has worsened from years of disuse. (perhaps) Unlike "...


3

You can always say Please trim the left side. Make it shorter on the right side. Leave the center as it is, while making the sides shorter. Hope that helps.


3

I agree with what others have said: Your suggestions are overly self-deprecating. If I feel a need to start with a qualifier, I might say something more like: I may not be an expert, but here's what I think... I'm relatively new to this, but I think...


3

Speaking as a Brit, I try not to be obsequious. To engage in such politenesses just seems embarrassing to modern ears. If someone asks for my opinion, I say what I think. If they don't want my opinion, they don't need to ask. Neither of your examples sound natural to me. A possible alternative (and one that I would recommend) is to start with "I think..."


3

I think it depends on if you are trying to be polite or matter-of-fact. If you were talking to your boss, or a respected elder, or good friend, neither of those work. Both are grammatical and fine for every other purpose. For anyone who I wanted to stay happy with me, it could be considered to be unfriendly or disrespectful. If it was my boss or friend, ...


3

The expression He casts a long shadow comes to mind - when something or someone that casts a long shadow, it means they have considerable influence on other people or events. However, your second example, 'a big head has a big ache', differs in meaning from the thread title, and when I read it, the expression With great power comes great ...


3

The proverb you mention is from the King Solomons' Proverbs in the Bible. The Hebrew original is: ""בִּרְצוֹת ה' דַּרְכֵי אִישׁ גַּם אוֹיְבָיו יַשְׁלִם אִתּוֹ" and there are many English translations here. Some nice options are: CEV: "When we please the Lord, even our enemies make friends with us". MSG: "When God approves of your life, even your enemies will end up ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible