4

I read the sentence and understood it. I think that any experienced reader would as well. I think that your usage is preferable to spelling everything out. The reader does have to retain a memory of what the previous sentences conveyed but that invites their engagement. However, both are acceptable usages.


3

We can speak of both making someone do something (your 'make + pronoun + verb), meaning cause them to do it or force them to do it and making them [adjective], meaning cause them to be in a certain condition. "It makes me excited" is the second usage.


2

There is a saying: "The perfect is the enemy of the good," meaning someone can try so hard to make a thing absolutely perfectly correct that they never actually complete the project and never release a "good" (but not perfect) version. This is sometimes stated as an imperative: "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good" or ...


2

Adjective clauses add detail, often serving to clarify or identify someone or something. As they are additional detail, they are often parenthetical. For example: My brother, whom you met last year, is coming home tomorrow. If I understand your question correctly, you are asking if the tense of an adjective clause can differ from the main clause. As you ...


1

I'd say " I intended the sentence to mean "Meaning Of The Sentence Comes Here" omitting "for"". That would be also OK to say "I intended to mean "Meaning Of The Sentence Comes Here" by the sentence I just wrote. "


1

You can hit several at a time by lining up enemies on a single arc with Piercing strikes. If this is a game involving hitting or striking enemies, then the example seems to have a misplaced-modifier problem. We could say You can hit several at a time with Piercing strikes by lining up enemies on a single arc. The following could be better, with a clear ...


1

Wiktionary "now that" Conjunction: As a consequence of the fact that; since. Like since, the words now that work as a conjunction. They introduce an adverbial clause, "the pause ... has introduced ...". That adverbial clause conditions or modifies the main clause, "It wont be any easier...", explaining why or when it won't be ...


1

From a syntactic point of view, both are valid. This is borne out by this NGram graph, which shows that both "sighed that" and "with relief that" do occur, however "with relief that" is very much more common, and most of the instances of "sighed that" occur across sentence boundaries, for example "sighed. That&...


1

This is a good opportunity to point out that other verbs trigger this be passive form also. The Secretary of State ordered (that) a committee be formed to investigate the matter. The Secretary of State advised (that) a committee be formed to investigate the matter. The Secretary of State recommended (that) a committee be formed to investigate the matter. The ...


1

You won't able to see the light of day ever again. You won't able to see the light of day never again. You won't able to see the light of day ever. see the light of day is defined as if an object sees the light of day, it is brought out of a place where it has been for a long time and hence is a valid phrase. https://www.macmillandictionary.com/...


1

most people forget about marketing before starting their business. so They will fail without earning even a dollar! The example could become clearer if we tidy it up, as suggested. [M]ost people forget about marketing before starting their business[,] so [t]hey fail without earning even a dollar! [M]ost people forget about marketing before starting their ...


1

The only way to know is to ask your teacher. Your sentences are grammatically correct, so the reason for a bad score must be that you aren't doing what the teacher asked you to do. For example, perhaps she told you to only use second conditionals. Or perhaps this was just the first question out of ten. But I can guess what "conditional chains" ...


1

The author is deliberately providing this as an example of an ambiguous sentence. The phrase "with a telescope" could be modifying the noun "woman", or it could be modifying the verb "to see". A woman with a telescope is a woman who has a telescope. To see something with a telescope is to see it by using the telescope. So the ...


1

It is ambiguous (and is a well known example of an ambiguous sentence) This is the point. English has ambiguous sentences that are only understandable in context. Also every other natural language has ambiguous sentences! But when writing mathematically you need to be unambiguous. (So how can you do maths if you need to express mathematical ideas in ...


1

"Pique" is a fairly rare word meaning "anger" or "annoyance". You'd only usually hear it in the phrase "a fit of pique" (a sudden outburst of anger) It is being used in an odd way here. It is clearly meant to suggest that the teacher has been patient. But Ashley has "gone too far" and now she has made her ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible