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Tom averted Mark's eyes. Were he and Mark still in unfriendly terms? Tom averted my eyes. Were Tom and I still in unfriendly terms? Firstly we must correct some mistakes. It is only possible to avert one's own eyes. You cannot avert someone else's eyes. (except perhaps by some unpleasant use of force). As @Dhanishtha Ghosh says, the word you need is "...


2

The construction X that Y was in such contexts is a rather "literary" way of saying Y was [an] X. It's always followed by a "related" assertion, which in some way naturally follows from the fact of Y being an X - usually, because Y is an X, [some related assertion]... Urban spirit that I was, I had no more aptitude as a farmer's daughter ...


2

Either "burden" or "burdens" fits. It's a question of how the speaker is thinking of them, and I don't see any reason to choose one over the other, given just that sentence. As to the prepositions, saying "They are a burden on me." is a simple statement about how they weigh on me. Saying "They are a burden to me." is a ...


2

Some commas or other punctuation could help understanding here. The phrase "until recently" is an extra part that adds information, but can be removed But the way that sperm whales find squid was until recently a puzzle. If you remove that parenthesis you get But the way that sperm whales find squid was a puzzle. The use of the past tense here ...


2

"Promise", in that use, should not be plural. American Heritage Dictionary "promise" Indication of something favorable to come; expectation: a promise of spring in the air. Indication of future excellence or success: a player of great promise. The expression "has recently shown to hold" is not grammatical. It would be ...


1

The problem is that you're trying to interpret this sentence as putting the same noun on both sides of the copula, and in this particular construction, that's not what is happening. The antecedent of "it" is "career," not "years," and "career" is singular. So you use "it was" rather than "they were."...


1

But the way that sperm whales find squid was until recently a puzzle Paraphrases ... the way that sperm whales find squid was a puzzle - until recently. or ... the way that sperm whales find squid was a puzzle - until a recent time. Answer Every part of the last sentence is in the past. We can infer from this that the puzzle is solved . However, in strict ...


1

The subject of this sentence is "Being more than 100 officers down" It is a participle/gerund phrase. This phrase is formed in the same way as "We are more than 100 officers down" There is no inversion here, the phrase "more than 100 officers down is a complement to the verb and comes after it. The gerund phrase has an implied ...


1

a. How's everything with "Y"? -- perfectly grammatical and all right, nothing implied, allows the responder to choose whether to respond in detail, just in general, or with comments plus some evaluation of their own how much you want to know. b. What's up with "Y"? -- This suggests that you know something about "Y" that you do ...


1

No, it can't be replaced by your suggested phrase. The antecedent of "that" is "television programming". The PBS television programming is more trusted than television programming of their competitors.


1

In the first example, Emergency services attended the scene and found the man trapped in his car This phrasing suggests (at least to me) that at the time when the emergency services arrived, he was trapped. The second example, Authorities have identified the man who was trapped in his car This phrasing suggests that the man was formerly trapped in his ...


1

"Degree" is the direct object of "recognize". The relative pronoun "which" refers to "degree". His intellectual curiosity paralleled the mentioned interests. They did so to some degree (maybe entirely), and that degree now embarrasses him. You could directly replace "the degree to which" with "how much&...


1

Yes. While inserting a "who are" would still be proper, the form as it is is more common. The emphasis can be a slightly split if the sentence is referring to the opposite of the norm, which I can't tell from the current context. An opposite situation: "Usually it's me flirting with the ladies, but since I got this sports car it's backwards.&...


1

Inverted sentence structure is used here. Often, to emphasize a point, this is done, as well as in question. For example: Kick the ball? Right past the goalie, he kicked it! He is going home. [statement] -> Is he going home? [query]


1

In a comparison, we are comparing things of like kind unless it is explicitly said that we are comparing things of unlike kind. [The height of] the ostrich is two times the boy’s height The ostrich is two times the boy’s height The ostrich’s height is two times the boy’s [height]. The ostrich’s height is two times the boy’s. all mean the same thing. The ...


1

To say someone is in "bad shape" or "out of shape" are almost equally used when referring to someone else's physical fitness. However, one thing to note is that "bad shape" can mean something else. "I'm in bad shape" can also mean I am injured. Or unwell, as with a virus or hangover. Or mentally or emotionally unwell....


1

You could use "most of all" or "best of all" if you want someone to respond with just one thing that they like most/best. If you ask what people like best (or most) about something, they may list a number of things. A group of things can be described as "the best", for example, an album of songs may be titled "the best of [...


1

The second example is correct except for the tense of die (when clauses normally use present tense) My seat will also go to her when I die. The meaning is slightly different. The sentence above is a description of the future. It states a fact. The form with the infinitive is rare (and should normally be avoided by learners) It expresses an intention or ...


1

I am going to consider the corrected sentence: The scientists reasoned that the clay was deposited from a world-encircling layer of dust enriched in iridium, created as a result of the impact of a big piece of space debris. This is a complex sentence. The main verb is "reasoned" and the object of that verb is "the clay was deposited from a ...


1

Both are idiomatic and natural. They mean exactly the same. Make you + adjective (make you happy) means cause you to be happy. Make you + noun is technically ambiguous. Make you a table means fabricate a table for you. Make you a princess means turn you into a princess. But there are few situations in which there is actual confusion. Make you into + noun (...


1

It's redundant but that's not bad. This quote has several examples of redundant expressions: "Breezes blowing" (what else do breezes do?) "sweet smells in the air" (where else do you get smells?) The particular part you ask about could be shortened to "everything is coming back to life". By adding "again" this ...


1

It is up to you whether you want to combine or split the sentences. I tend to prefer shorter sentences, as they are easier to parse. You are less likely to make mistakes in a short sentence.


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You can't use the word famine in this sense, not even hyperbolically. You can say "He looks like he hasn't eaten for a week" or "He must have been starving!" (as suggested by comments) Never use "like he just got out of Auschwitz". That's about as bad as casually use the "N" word.


1

It is a complex sentence with the main clause (previous work shows) and the dependent object clause (the scout recruits a new scout to join her on a trek to the good site). The main clause consists of the subject Previous work and predicate shows. The object clause consists of the subject the scout and the predicate recruits (the rest of the sentence I won't ...


1

a) Elections that were to be held on Monday have been cancelled. This is correct. In the past, the elections were to have been held. They no longer are to be held. (b) Elections that are be be held on Monday have been cancelled. This makes no sense. If the elections are to be held then they have not been cancelled. You cannot both cancel and hold the ...


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