9

OP is mistaken in thinking that native Anglophones wouldn't say I will fly to London after 10 days. The only relevant factor here is that after [some amount of time] requires a context within which some particular point in time (past or future) has already been established. Thus... I'll go to Glasgow on December the 12th, and stay with my aunt. I will fly ...


5

[1] Andrew decided [to buy a sundae instead of a double-scoop cone]. [2] Peter and Elaine could not decide [if they wanted to elope or have a big wedding]. [3] The beach is a lot of fun, [yet the mountains are better]. [4] I am going to the park because [I like nature] You've cited a mixed bag of examples, each containing a subordinate (dependent) clause, ...


4

Breaking it down: The vaccination was in April. You could get the booster after six months [had passed]. In other words, as of September onwards. Likewise: They will continue until 12 December, but will be reassessed after 10 days." That means as of 22 December, those measures will be reassessed. Anytime AFTER that. It is not specific. Those measures ...


4

"Teeth cavities" would be incorrect. Nouns used as adjectives to modify other nouns are nearly always singular. We would say "causes tooth cavities". "Cavities in teeth" is fine, but less idiomatic. It would be like saying "services for customers" when you can just say "customer service".


4

Firstly: in all of these statements, the information that the bank will not lend us money is conveyed. The different usage of 'any more' simply implies things about the context of the statement, depending on how it is used. 'The bank is not willing to lend us any more money.'[1] In this context, the usage of 'any more' to modify 'money' implies that the ...


3

I think the distinction here is when you start counting. "I will fly to London in ten days' time" means ten days from now, the time of speaking. If you want to start counting the ten days from some other point, you would use "after" (or "later"), for example "I will go to New York, then fly to London after ten days" ...


3

The phrase is get/have one's own way. The author modifies it by adding rather too much. Rather qualifies too much and means to a certain or significant extent or degree. It might have been used to soften too much (to make it less assertive). One might parse it as follows: the power of having rather too much her own way the power of having [rather too much] ...


2

There's a fairly subtle difference in meaning here. After 10 days means that the measures are in place now, and their effects will be reassessed after having 10 days experience with them. If you say you will do something in 10 days, that implies that you are not doing it now, and won't be doing it until those 10 days have passed.


2

First, Honest work is not necessarily hard work: it might be something you find quite easy, but it's honest (not criminal, cheating, or getting paid for doing nothing). Secondly Money it's made from an honest work is not English. I think you mean Money that's made from honest work (or more naturally money earned from honest work). Thirdly, in combination ...


2

For the first part, the first two are not natural and the third probably doesn't describe what you mean: according to the Cambridge Dictionary, when used as a noun, wonder means "surprise and admiration". If you were a famous TV star, "in wonder" might therefore be appropriate. The most natural way of saying this would be The woman ...


2

I'd go with the first, largely as a matter of style. In general, a simple sentence leads with the most important part of a subject. So, the first example focusses on "teaching aids", telling the listener where to find them. The second example would normally be seen as focusing on the library, and I'd expect subsequent sentences to discuss or ...


2

The general rule is this: Every clause must contain either one predicate or multiple predicates connected in series; every predicate must contain either one simple predicate (SP) or multiple SPs connected in series. Let's look at your example sentences and all of the verbs. (Important note: I am using fairly traditional definitions of "clause" and &...


1

This version of for is only used in literature and high rhetoric. It means "because". See the second definition here. However, "for" operates grammatically a bit differently than "because", in that it can only be used to conclude a point. If the president, giving a speech, said: We will persevere, for we are a great nation. ...


1

This use of 'as' means 'although'. Difficult as the outbreak was, we managed to finish it. Although the outbreak was difficult, we managed to finish it. You'll find this use and definition in the dictionary.


1

It's 'the perfect cure for your worried scattered mind'. We don't normally like being made to watch and hear videos, as they are often annoying in some way, (e.g. the voice, as in this case). It is probably helpful to turn on the closed-caption subtitles. In this case they have mis-spelled 'your' as 'you'. Maybe a computer makes the subtitles?


1

Generally, this kind of use falls into a commonly used phrasing: "[Action will be performed on Subject] after [Condition is fulfilled]" For example: "I will eat this apple after I have brushed my teeth" "The money will enter my account after proof of identification has been provided" The example in the OP is the same: "[The ...


1

Since this is an article about Austria, and I am Austrian, I guess there is something I can add as detail. I found quite the same statement in German (Austria's native language) at www.austria.info on 21st of November, so one day before the lockdown begins: Dieser Lockdown ab Montag, 22. November wird nach 10 Tagen evaluiert und soll spätestens mit 13. ...


1

Idiomatically, we rarely include the infinitive marker in contexts like All you can do is [to] be polite. Feasibly, including it is actually "ungrammatical", but I don't really know or care about that. Suffice it to say It's not good, but it does occur (that's a link to many written instances in Google Books). On the other hand, we did normally ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible