94

In the context of running errands, go to (some place) is idiomatic speech, and it means more than the physical act of going to that location. So, when I “go to the store,” I don’t merely park in a parking spot and then go home; rather, I go into the store – presumably to purchase some items. Similarly, when you go to the dentist, you go inside and get your ...


30

The sentence has a lot of qualifications which make it look more complicated than it really is. The core is: A person abandons the right to take sides later. What kind of person? A person who agrees to mediate between two parties Any person who agrees to mediate between them? No—only a person who is asked to mediate by both parties Does the ...


29

I had dozed off when we crashed. .......................... when the car accident happened. You should use the past perfect tense because your falling asleep happened before the car accident. doze off phrasal verb If you doze off, you fall into a light sleep, especially during the daytime. [V P] ⇒ I closed my eyes for a minute and must have dozed off.


27

The unambiguous way to say this in English is, "the wife of one of my friends". If you are talking about one friend with multiple wives, you could say "one of my friend's wives". If you have many friends, each of whom has one wife, you could say "one of my friends' wives". There are many wives, one for each friend, so you must use the plural "wives". Yes, ...


26

The word "Enter" is used in scripts and screenplays - the kind that actors read from - as a stage direction. For example, "Enter Hamlet" means that the character Hamlet enters the stage at that point in the script. A stage direction might also add other detail, for example "enter Hamlet holding a sword". It is a fairly common ...


25

Whatever happens. Whatever what is is is what I want. Only that. But that. Whatever "what is" is, is what I want. (Second cup of coffee to the rescue.) Although is appears three times in a row, it is copular only once, in is what I want. In "What is", is means exists. And the second is (Whatever what is is) means happens to be. Whatever ...


23

The sentence is a way of saying: Angular is what HTML would have been if it had been designed for applications. In general, phrases of the form "if [noun] [helping verb] [verb]" can be rewritten as "[helping verb] [noun] [verb]". EDIT: As Colleen pointed out in her comment, helping verbs are also commonly called auxiliary verbs. Examples: If I ...


21

In American English, it's definitely "What is this called?". "How is this called" is a common mistake with second language learners. If this phrasing is used, it will signal to any native speakers viewing the diagram that it was created by a learner. In the Google nGram data, "How is this called" doesn't even appear.


21

You can, actually use the form you're talking about but you can't use "are". The problem is that a person isn't described as being a job, they have a job. When you use "are" in "What job are you?" you're saying that that job is part of what they are, which isn't really the case. When we say "What is your job?", we are asking "What is the job that you have?",...


21

I can't see any good reason for supposing that either version is "correct" (or by implication, that the other is "incorrect"), but there's certainly a big difference in prevalence... I can't see any way to justify the possibility that one sequence might actually mean something different to the other1. They seem to net down to the same thing to me... He's ...


19

Your student is not wrong. Natively in American English we use "go" in this way. "Go" in most cases implies "to be" which means you don't have to specifically say you are in a place. "Go" also implies an action which is specific from context. When I go to the movies, I often buy popcorn. In this example, I will "go” (exist at) the movie theater with the ...


17

Short answer: Yes, these are minor sentences. They consist of a single clause that's usually categorized under "minor clauses". Examples of minor clauses are optatives, conditional fragments, verbless directives, parallel structures, elliptical constructions, vocatives, exclamatives, interjections and other stereotyped expressions and headlines. [1], [2], [...


17

I'm not sure that in modern usage of english that we refer to class directly in this way - people tend to reference the attributes that go with being in an upper-class environment, rather than referring to the class itself. For example, in the scenario you have provided, one might say: Have some etiquette! Show/have a little decorum. Show some ...


17

The daughter of your husband's brother is your niece. We don't normally distinguish between family relations by birth and family relations by marriage. Unless for some reason you need to. In which case you would say: She is the daughter of my brother-in-law. or She is my brother-in-law's daughter. Of course it's perfectly fine to say "husband's ...


17

Both ways are correct English. I gave her your number This is a perfectly fine response, and the slightly less formal of the two. I gave your number to her This is a slightly more awkward construction, but is also slightly more formal. One thing to note is that in some contexts, they can imply that something else has happened since then (especially if ...


17

Actually "handwritten paper" is fine, although in this case "paper" does not mean the physical material but rather a school essay or other written assignment. See definition 4 or 7 here. Example: She handed in her paper late, but her teacher still gave her an A. However it's not a phrase you hear much these days. See this Ngram as an example -- note ...


16

The correct version is What did you say? The simple reason for this is that when you form a question like this in English, you use an auxiliary verb, in this case "do". When the question is in the past tense, you conjugate the auxiliary verb, but the main verb is just the bare infinitive, "say", and never changes. What does he say? What did he say? ...


16

Q. "What is this dog called?" A. "Fido" Q. "How is this dog called?" A. "Using a dog whistle."


15

Under this kind of condition, I'd be likely to adopt a quite formal tone, rather than less formal phrases such as "dozed off", so I'd think something like: I'm sorry, I was asleep at the time of the accident. I don't know what happened. Mind you, I'd expect a certain lack of coherence from someone who had just regained conciousness after an accident so ...


15

I don’t know anyone who would say, “Maintain your class.” The word class in this context doesn’t usually get a personal possessive pronoun such as my or your. Instead, we’d use a determiner like some: Hey! Show some class. Other good suggestions have been given in other answers – I particularly like “Show some manners.” I think “Don’t be crass” is good,...


14

The two sentence are not at all written in a similar way! The first time when I drove was at driving school. That is built up a bit like: (some instance) when (I did something) was (at a specific place) Now: Dracula when I saw was the latest movie. Is built up more like: (the object I did something with) when (I did something) was (a special kind of ...


14

Abruptly is redundant in both sentences since "accidents" are usually abrupt. What you are trying to say is I was taking a nap when the accident happened. I was asleep when the accident happened So either "catching some z's" or "having a cat nap" could be used since both are equivalent phrases to "taking a nap". The choice is stylistic. http://www....


14

I was catching some Z’s that the accident happened abruptly. I was having a cat nap that the accident happened abruptly. The second half of both of these doesn't work. "That" isn't suitable where you've put it – I think your getting confused with the construction "I was so [adjective] that [event]", meaning "[Event] happened because I was ...


13

This question is anything but clear. It's muddled by design. :^) But I'll take a shot at it. NOAD defines sentence like this: sentence (n.) a set of words that is complete in itself, typically containing a subject and predicate, conveying a statement, question, exclamation, or command, and consisting of a main clause and sometimes one or more subordinate ...


13

You can start with the punctuation. For this sentence, the commas divide the sentence usefully. Consider what each phrase means, and what it relates to. There is plenty to see in Phnom Penh, the capital of [Cambodia], starting with a tour of the Silver Pagoda, the National Museum and the market areas where hand-woven silks and antiques will compete for your ...


13

I think your sentence sounds fine. However, the use of the noun fruits would sound strange to a native speaker in the context of how you've used it here. When you are talking about fruit in general then it's best to use fruit which is an uncountable noun. In some cases the noun fruits can be used as in the following example. My three favourite fruits are ...


13

My understanding is that picks should be changed to picked. As for the philosophical content explicitly picked over in the film’s dialogue, it’s something for the viewer to digest. Now it sounds normal.


12

Grammatically, this can be summed up neatly by some ungrammatical use of parentheses: (Whatever (what is) is) is what I want. Each phrase in parentheses is a noun phrase and can be substituted by any other noun, e.g., (Whatever (infinity) is) is what I want. Another way to disambiguate is to rephrase with a demonstrative: (Whatever (what is) is), ...


12

There are numerous grammatical and idiomatic errors in the linked article. It was clearly written by a non-native English speaker. I can't tell you if this is because it is a translation from the Chinese, or for some other reason. However, this particular sentence is fine. This use of "it" is what is called an "existential" or "dummy" pronoun, and is ...


12

In this phrase, 'that' is being used as a pronoun, standing in for the noun 'the vote'. So perhaps it could be read as: Indeed, in the first round he got a vote 80% of the vote of Emmanuel Macron's. In less terse, more readable wording, one might say: Indeed, in the first round, the votes he received totalled 80% of the votes received by Emmanuel ...


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