5

The correct way to say it is I don't cook sushi because i got told off the first time i tried. also: "Got" is a common daily-English usage in these cases. It means the same thing as using "was". While fine in daily speech, it would not do in formal writing or a formal presentation. So you can use 'got' or 'was' it does not really ...


3

I think "All that was left" is a noun phrase, and used as the subject of the sentence here.


3

Think of it like this: [All [that was left]] was [a triangular piece of metal]. "All that was left" is a noun phrase, and is the subject of the main clause. "Was" is the verb of the main clause, and "a triangular piece of metal" is the complement of the verb. "That was left" is a relative clause (a subordinate clause ...


2

There are a couple of problems with B. The conjuction "but" is used to join two independent clauses together. In B the first clause starts with "though" which is a subordinating conjunction. There is nothing for it to be subordinate to. If you removed "Though" All players do play hard, but when the captain is motivated, they ...


2

What you've written conveys your meaning. I don't think you need the particular phrase you ask for. I might say it a little differently, perhaps The Effective Altruism movement has had substantial impact even though it is little known. I hope your surrounding text describes how that impact came about, given that the movement is unknown. What was the ...


2

Additional context from Great Expectations: It was a dirty place enough, and I dare say not unknown to smuggling adventurers; but there was a good fire in the kitchen, and there were eggs and bacon to eat, and various liquors to drink To me, it looks like unusual rephrasing of "a dirty enough place," meaning it was fairly dirty but not very dirty....


2

All that was left was a triangular piece of metal. All is a subject(S) and was is a finite verb (real verb) "that was left" a relative pronoun clause which has "All" as an antecedent. In this relative clause(that was left), "that" is a subject and it is called "nominative or subjective case of relative pronoun"; here ...


1

There was a chill in the air, and we were all of us tired. That is a funny way to put it. So in a non-native speaker it would be seen as wrong or awkward. In literature it would be presumed to have been done on possible and would be almost poetic.


1

Later on, when I will have more experience as a Salesperson It's not necessary or usual to include "will". Note I'm giving an answer because others seem to be answering in the comments which is not in accordance with the SE rules. Giving an actual answer allows up-votes, down-votes and allows the OP to accept an answer if desired.


1

It is fine, though I would not put a comma in it. This kind of inversion, which is rather literary, is required when a negative polarity item is brought to the front of the clause, eg Never, Scarcely, Only (introducing a phrase or a clause), On no account, etc.


1

This is an outdated use of "nor". In modern English, we use it as a negative form of "or". When giving options in the positive, we use 'either/or', when speaking in the negative we use 'neither/nor'. However, in earlier forms of English, 'nor' meant 'and not', which is not so far from its modern use anyway. So, your line in this ...


1

The nor is attached to the uninspired to make a double negative, not the obeyed. This is made clear from the preceding line: The voice divine confess’d the warlike maid, Here, "confessed" is used in an archaic sense, meaning "revealed". The identity of the warlike maid (Pallas, or Athena) is revealed by her divine voice. Ulysses is ...


1

This is a sentence with a verb (teach), a direct object (what is being taught) and an indirect object (who it is being taught to). Because it's a passive form, the indirect object (the student) has become the subject of the sentence. The thing which is being taught (being polite) is still the direct object. If you're asking about the structure of teach to be ...


1

In US usage at least the form For stars, engaging in conflicts likely harms their reputation is perfectly acceptable and not uncommon. It may be considered a reduced form of For stars, engaging in conflicts IS likely TO harm their reputation. But I don't actually think so. The word "likely " here functions as an adverb, modifying "harms&...


1

"capable is often used with "of" as can be seen in this definition, particularly sense three having attributes (such as physical or mental power) required for performance or accomplishment is capable of intense concentration "able" just isn't used that wqay, as can be seen from this definition. However one could use "able&...


1

I am aware of the idiom "I'd sooner do sth" A related idiom is "I'd sooner A than B", where A and B are clauses, often in the subjunctive case, where the speaker is ordering their preferences for certain hypothetical situations (rather than certain personal actions, as in "I'd sooner do"). The meaning is "I prefer a ...


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