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Reflective writing

I tried to understand the whole paragraph. Is this what you mean? First and foremost, I would suggest you should begin preparations well in advance. While you are waiting for your visa you can find a ...
James Mathai's user avatar
  • 1,065
1 vote
Accepted

"So, why would we possibly want to go there?" VS "So, why on earth would we want to go there?"

Why would [subject] possibly want [unlikely thing]? is used quite often, and in most cases it's equivalent to Why on earth would [subject] want [unlikely thing]? But we're much more likely to use Why +...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

"So, why would we possibly want to go there?" VS "So, why on earth would we want to go there?"

Yes; you could think of it as "how could it be possible that we would want to go there?" That is, it's rhetorically suggesting a distinction between reality and fantasy, that wanting to go ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

"He neither texted me nor did he call me". "He neither texted me nor called me". "He neither texted me nor he called me"

Stylistically speaking, since the neither occurs immediately after the sentence’s subject, it is in the position where one (prototypically) expects to find a verb phrase. For that reason, each of the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Reflective writing

"(to) spend time by yourself" is a phrase headed by the verb "spend". But the clause structure "These things are ...." needs to be complemented by a noun or an adjective ...
James K's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

With what tense I follow up "it's time"

We use past tense after it’s time or it’s high time not because the action to take is in the past but because they are due or overdue. Hence this shouldn’t cause the subordinate clause to go past ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

Interesting structure: --- "If you ever go to sell this place, let me know."

ever go to {verb} means "are ever about to take the first step to begin {verbing}", as distinct from merely contemplating {verbing} and distinct from actually being in the act of {verbing}. ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
6 votes

Interesting structure: --- "If you ever go to sell this place, let me know."

Sell the house means—or anyway can mean—complete the transaction, thereby ceding ownership (at which point the man would have missed his opportunity). Go to sell the house here means consider selling, ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

How should I understand the following italic and bold part?

"Proper" has several meanings and usages. For whatever reason, with this particular usage, it's common to put it after the noun it modifies. It's covered by definition 6 in Merriam-Webster: ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

"There is posh." (talking about a tea pot)

It is a common idiomatic construction, particularly in Welsh dialects of English, and in northern English dialects too. You're correct that 'posh' is an adjective, but you'd see nothing unusual about ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
3 votes

Does the italicized part serve as the main clause of the whole sentence?

(1) No, it is not the main clause; it is an embedded content (noun) clause functioning as an extraposed subject in the main clause (It was ...) The clue to it not being the main clause is that it is ...
ishtar's user avatar
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