New answers tagged

0

Option A would read as follows (with a few commas added for clarity): In the 1970s scientists found out that chemicals, having been released into the atmosphere, destroyed the ozone layer. If you include these commas, the sentence is grammatical. However, it states that the ozone layer was completely destroyed, which is not the case. It also suggests ...


1

As an adjective, able generally only takes three forms: able, abler, and ablest. From Merriam-Webster: 1 a : having sufficient power, skill, or resources to do something // able to solve a problem 2 : abler\ -​b(ə-​)lər\; ablest\ -​b(ə-​)ləst\ : marked by intelligence, knowledge, skill, or competence Although it's more common to use more able ...


0

The word "able" isn't used as a verb, so it doesn't have a past participle. The word "able" is used as an adjective: I'm able to play tennis I able to play tennis (not correct) Then perfect form "I have been able" follows.


0

I would prefer "he came to visit me" or simply "he visited me" in all registers, formal or informal. But there is nothing at all wrong with "he came and visited me" -- the difference is a matter of style. This google ngram indicates that the "and" form is much less common (in the corpus that google uses). This alternate ngram indicates that "he visited me" ...


0

I see nothing wrong with the grammar of the sentence in bold, nor do I find it hard to follow and understand. I don't see it as having tw dependent clauses, merely one complex dependent clause "because the unemployment rate is lower in the first region (11 percent compared to 13 percent)" But I don't know of any rule prohibiting multiple dependent clauses ...


2

Because we do not have the full context, in particular the meaning of the abbreviation 'EI', it is impossible to be sure what meaning is intended. But irrespective of the details, I do not see where the problem that you see in 'two dependent clauses' comes from. The sentence in bold has the following logical structure:'...because of A, something happens.' ...


2

To inform the reader that more information will be coming later on you could use This/[X] will be covered/discussed later This/[X] will be covered/discussed in a later chapter This/[X] will be covered/discussed in more detail/depth later on.


3

This is completely correct, as he's still alive, use is, in the simple present. For a person no longer living, use was, which is simple past. Here "born" is an adjective describing what kind of leader Ali is or was, an expansion of He is a leader. It has the same meaning and grammar as "natural leader". However, as "born" is also a verb, you can also say ...


0

This is not something that is specific to a verb of perception. You can use any transitive verb in a restrictive clause where the object of that verb is the noun that the restrictive clause modifies: (A) I sent the letter. (B) This is the letter that I sent. In (A), sent is a transitive verb with [the] letter as its object. In (B), the bolded text ...


0

This is simply journalese, where omitting words when the meaning can still be grasped is common. In fact what the question quotes is a headline, where this tendency is even more marked. Much the same phrase appe3ars in the body of the article: Remainers, passionate pro-Europeans, sensible pragmatists, people who over a lifetime have earned a measure of ...


1

However much No matter how much. However much it might embarrass you, you're taking your little sister to that concert! In this case, you could say: Whatever and however much is thrown into the pit, it stays empty.


0

"the government conducting a publicity campaign" is an action that the government might take, which the speaker suggests would rectify the effect (presumably detailed in an earlier sentence). the word "conducting" is a verb form here, and so this is a verb phrase, as it should be because it describes an action. "a publicity campaign" is a noun phrase, it ...


1

The error you have made is that "so" has two different uses. One is an adverb which has a similar application as "too", for example: That is so kind of you. That is too kind of you. However, the meaning is not identical and they are not strictly interchangeable. "So" means "to a great extent" whereas "too" means "to an excessive degree" (although some ...


3

It means that people lie most in the following cases: 1) Before elections (They make fake promises, give false hope to people in order to get their votes, and forget/ignore those promises once they are in power) 2) During war (Leaders and authorities lie in war for multiple purposes, either give false information to people to avoid panic, or ignite ...


0

"Give an exemplary sentence" or "Give a sentence as an example" are correct.


1

A problem with would suggest that the subject is the source of the problem. A problem for means that the subject has to deal with the problem. So in case of laziness, it is a problem that students have to overcome, so it is a problem for them. Laziness is a problem for many students. Many students have problems with laziness. General rule: ...


2

Apart from being a good student, he is also a good son. I would agree that the being is required in this case. However I would also ask whether apart is the word you want to use. It is commonly held by some that good students are typically good sons. So perhaps something like: In addition to being a good student, he is also a good son. In short: You ...


3

MEDICINE can be used both as a countable and uncountable noun. So we can say: "Here is some medicine" (uncountable noun) or "Here are some medicines" (countable noun). See the entry from Oxford Dictionary: "NOUN mass noun A drug or other preparation for the treatment or prevention of disease. ‘give her some medicine’ count noun ‘your doctor will ...


3

This is the entry for thunder from the Cambridge Dictionary: thunder noun UK ​ /ˈθʌn.dər/ US ​ /ˈθʌn.dɚ/ B1 [U] the sudden loud noise that comes from the sky especially during a storm Note the U, which indicates that thunder is uncountable. Uncountable nouns don't generally require an indefinite article, unless you are talking about a particular type ...


-1

Since it is "the focus of my thesis", the correct way is "My thesis' focus"


0

Using "that" after "demonstrate" and "prove" is perfectly fine. Actually, I would have to make an effort to find another correct way to use those words (and I doubt that it exists). If the demonstration is in the current paper, it sounds awkward (to me, at least) to use the past tense. I would actually use the present tense, because you speak / write about ...


4

Michael Harvey suggests that you really should only have to "justify" yourself once. This is why he says "try to justify" makes more sense in your example, because of the word "keep", which indicates an ongoing action. In this way it's like "finish" or "arrive". You normally don't "keep finishing" or "keep arriving", as these are one-time events. You ...


0

I'll give you a short answer. Note that my usage of parentheses is a little different from yours. This suggests that (our locations are of [such quality] that [ (( ((features)) with {higher} {discriminative power} {than} {is normally found in Bag-of-Words} )) are now required]). It looks really messy, so let's break it down a little. our locations are ...


0

The first "that" phrase includes all of words that follow it. This is a very wordy sentence with a lot of modifiers. I like to remove the modifiers and see if that helps. This suggests that our locations are of such quality that features [with higher discriminative power than is normally found in Bag-of-Words] are now required. The bracketed phrase is ...


0

That "got" is just omissible. See HAVE | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary: have modal verb have (got) to do sth ​And see Have got to and have to - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary: Have got to and have to mean the same. Have got to is more informal. We use have (got) to here to refer to both verbs.


1

These work: I had no idea that I would react the same way to her texting him as I had to her seeing him. I had no idea that I would react to her texting him the way I had to her seeing him. With two I hads and one I'd the sentence had become a little repetetive. So I changed your I'd to I would. Alternatives? Well, you could rewrite it. For ...


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I'm just commenting, not answering. Sorry that I don't have 50 reputation yet. You may downvote me as you like. This is wrong: That makes him very happy and says this: "..." It should be That makes him very happy and he says this: "..."


1

I had to look up Thanos to understand the usage. For anyone else who doesn't know, he's a fictional supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics (hence, a natural enemy of superhero Spiderman). Standard English syntax would require an adjective / adjectival phrase after the noun phrase all things. In a typical context such as ...


2

"I do not" is an expression of fact, or personal observation. "I will not" describes a personal preference. In this case, it's more common to express this as a preference, so either C or D ("won't accept") is better. I think it's a question of context and dialect whether "excuse" should be singular or plural, so I can't say for certain which would be ...


-1

I must admit I cannot fully subscribe to Astralbee's answer. I do agree with Astralbee that your version is not acceptable formal writing. My reason, however is different. Mine is that your second sentence lacks a verb. In speech, however, there is no way to distinguish between a comma and a period so that there would be no perceptible difference at all ...


0

Your re-write doesn't make sense because you have broken it into two sentences. The original is a statement of what happened, followed by the reason why. The phrase "the sole reason being" only serves to qualify that there was only one reason why it happened. You could remove those 4 words and it would still make sense: Over the weekend the LA Lakers ...


1

Yes, your guess is right. It is twice as tough to get in with twins as to get in with one kid.


1

the phrase "have a job" can carry any of several meanings. Here it means "I work at the coffee shop bussing tables". (In case you are not familiar with this use of "bussing", it means "clearing tables of used dishes, and setting the tables up ready for the next customer" She needs to organize the project. She will have quite a job doing that. means that ...


1

More common usage would be: "the whole world collapsed around me." or "the whole world crumbled around me." but since this is clearly fiction, you are allowed a degree or two of "poetic licence" and there are loads of similar similes available, with slight adjustment, such as "a hole opened up beneath my feet"


1

About the only context where native speakers use the construction behind [possessive (pro)noun] back (OP's example #3) is the figurative usage... If you've got something to say, say it! Don't just go talking about me behind my back! ...which doesn't really mean from a physical location somewhere behind me (it nearly always means when I'm not present to ...


0

Behind works the best. Behind them seems to imply that there was literally nothing behind their backs which is the same problem with the third sentence. The phrase "leave nothing behind" is not literal and refers to the act of destroying/taking everything of value. By far I would say 1 is the best choice.


4

The phrase "the data bus" here is a name for "a bank of electrical traces". I am influenced by knowing that this is the factually correct answer. The sentence could possibly be interpreted otherwise, but "the data bus" is a parenthetical, so it should give more information about the preceding grammatical object, as in fact it does here. If the intent was ...


4

"People for whom gold holds no allure" isn't actually a full sentence, but a noun phrase. Like a noun, a noun phrase can serve as part of a sentence, such as a subject or a direct object. For example, suppose I know or have heard of some people, and one of the things I know about these people is that gold holds no allure for them. (That is, they don't find ...


0

There are many sayings which have a very similar sense: He giveth and he taketh away "He" is god, and the old forms -eth (instead of gives and takes) gives it a Biblical tone, as it is paraphrasing Job 1:21. Although in religious situations it's normally used to speak of the giving of life and death, you might hear it in the context of a person having ...


0

I think Let me be... is better than May I be... Example: "Don't let me be misunderstood!" Indifferent in itself is neither positive, not negative. It just implies the lack of both. However, put in contexts, it usually suggests the cancelling of the implied potential action. He could stop the killings. But he was indifferent.


0

The Philosophers aren't just emphasizing the studying one human, they are emphasizing the study of all humans. Since they are emphasizing the studying more than one thing the thing is plural. Please see this article.


1

According to the Collins Dictionary, it's perfectly fine and grammatically correct. on trial [phrase] If someone is on trial, they are being tried in a court of law. He is currently on trial accused of serious assault. on trial [phrase] If you say that someone or something is on trial, you mean that they are in a situation where people ...


3

"Is on trial" is the common phrase and perfectly correct. The passive "is put" is odd in the example you give, using the present tense. The verb "put" indicates a single act, but you want to talk about an ongoing state. You could "put" in the past tense: John is on trial for murder John was put on trial for murder three weeks ago.


1

Yes this is a pretty normal phrase in English (certainly in the UK). To give - to offer something to someone, or to provide someone with something) def. Hope - the feeling that something desired can be had or will happen def. To give [someone] hope - to offer the feeling that something will happen All your phrases make sense, I would just consider ...


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