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1 vote

Any difference between "Why would A PERSON do this?" --- "Why would a CERTAIN TYPE OF PERSON do this?"

The son obviously is the 'type of person' for whom 'a cat or dog isn't enough', so she refers to him as 'a certain type'. She is asking "What is it about people like him that makes them want to ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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1 vote

What is direct speech form of these sentences? 1. He asked me if I had come by train or by bus 2. She wanted to know who we had invited to the party

There is no such thing as the "direct speech form". You can talk about the "form" of a verb or a phrase: "did" is past tense form of "do", or "to be ...
James K's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

What is direct speech form of these sentences? 1. He asked me if I had come by train or by bus 2. She wanted to know who we had invited to the party

Your direct speech form for the first sentence is correct: He said, "Did you come by train or by bus?" For the second sentence, here's the direct speech form: She said, "Who did you ...
Fateme Mirjalili's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

"It was a stoney castle kind of thing." VS "It was kind of a stoney castle. --- Is the 1st sentence as valid as the 2nd one?

So, it was a stony, log cabin, castle kind of thing. So, it was kind of a stony log cabin castle. Question: Do you think "stony castle kind of a thing" is as valid as "kind of a stony ...
Lambie's user avatar
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1 vote

Cancer patient says "I haven't got to be bored." --- Does it mean "I mustn't be bored"?

I put this in a comment, but since it's at odds with the only upvotable answer, I think I should actually post it. I've just listened to the utterance in context. I think you can tell from the ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
0 votes

Cancer patient says "I haven't got to be bored." --- Does it mean "I mustn't be bored"?

To save others the trouble, this is a British speaker saying, "It was a great life. It was all fun. It was never, ever boring. And that's the whole thing for me—I haven't got to be bored. [Small ...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Any difference between "He was taken down there." AND "He was taken there."?

There's not really any difference - it's just 'extra' information, although in this case it is somewhat unnecessary. 'Down' is obviously an adverb of direction, but we use 'up' and 'down' in ways ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Why does this sentence have "And so it was" at the beginning? | "And so it was that the beggar died."

"And so it was that..." is used to transition between sentences, usually indicating the passage of time. However, you do not hear this phrasing outside of a historical narrative. If you ...
partyphysics's user avatar

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