94

In the context of running errands, go to (some place) is idiomatic speech, and it means more than the physical act of going to that location. So, when I “go to the store,” I don’t merely park in a parking spot and then go home; rather, I go into the store – presumably to purchase some items. Similarly, when you go to the dentist, you go inside and get your ...


90

A balloon contains air under pressure. When it pops, the air expands. Merriam-Webster defines "explode" as, among other things: to burst forth with sudden violence or noise from internal energy, such as...to burst violently as a result of pressure from within Referring to a balloon "exploding" refers to this sudden release of expanding ...


75

It merely reflects that someone is doing something somewhat earlier than expected because there may not be another opportunity to do so conveniently. If you do not communicate with your client daily, he may give you a holiday greeting more than a week before Christmas. Your client probably will not have an opportunity to say “Merry Christmas” to you on ...


21

I understand it in this way As I will probably not talk to you before the holidays begin, I hope you have a very happy, healthy and safe holiday! Or As it is likely I will not talk to you before the holidays begin, I hope you have a very happy, healthy and safe holiday!


20

"I am very sorry for your loss," is probably most common. You can elaborate if you wish, but otherwise this is simple and sufficient, especially if you are not very close to either the bereaved or the deceased.


19

Well, the first thing I must point out is that neither of these sentences are correct without an 'a' in them. It was a pleasure to meet/meeting you. As for whether you should use "to meet" or "meeting", it makes no difference. The meaning and usage is completely interchangeable. I would not recommend using "to have met you" except for specific ...


19

Your student is not wrong. Natively in American English we use "go" in this way. "Go" in most cases implies "to be" which means you don't have to specifically say you are in a place. "Go" also implies an action which is specific from context. When I go to the movies, I often buy popcorn. In this example, I will "go” (exist at) the movie theater with the ...


16

The expression goes back to days when most middle-class people bought shoes hand-cobbled to their own measure. These were of course more expensive than today's mass-produced shoes, and it was routine to extend their life by periodically replacing the ‘shoe leather’ which suffered the most wear—the heels and half-soles. This literal sense of ‘shoe leather’ ...


16

It is very common in English for speakers and writers to say "if [something happens]" when they actually mean "in case", to the point there's a subgenre of jokes premised on taking the "if" literally. In such a case where the "then" is clearly intended to apply regardless of the "if" (we can presume the other ...


15

As some of the comments have mentioned, it's not frequently used in English. I would say that, unless it's being used in a humorous way, the phrase is usually reserved for fine dining settings. In other words, if a bachelor friend of mine was about to eat a bowl of hastily prepared Ramen noodles, or if I was about to eat a hamburger with my nephew at ...


14

Both more and else are syntactically fine in OP's example, and in many contexts they'll mean exactly the same thing. But note that idiomatically, What more do you need? is far more likely when what's being asked is effectively a rhetorical question (implying the speaker thinks you either don't or shouldn't need anything else). Also note that when using ...


13

I think your sentence sounds fine. However, the use of the noun fruits would sound strange to a native speaker in the context of how you've used it here. When you are talking about fruit in general then it's best to use fruit which is an uncountable noun. In some cases the noun fruits can be used as in the following example. My three favourite fruits are ...


13

I think there are many possible reasons for this; a single answer is not possible. Some suggestions: Explode is a frequent word, whereas implode is less frequent, and somewhat limited to technical discussions. Therefore, it could simply be a case of the more frequent word covering a greater range of meanings / being used more vaguely. Although balloons end ...


12

I would like to offer you my condolences or My condolences on the death of your grandmother Is how you would say that. If you actually knew person who died though, they would probably expect something more personal, to the tune of. I was so sorry to hear that your grandmother passed away, She was such a nice woman and I always enjoyed her company.


11

I agree with the suggestion offered by Happy & StoneyB; that is, you could simply sign your name with "Ms.", and hope that he notices and gets the hint. That said, your question asked about a good way to phrase it. I think the best policy is to be gracious and try not to embarrass the other party. As for the use of "female," you could use that, or you ...


11

Been is widely used in a number of British and American dialects as an abbreviated form of present perfect have been/has been. In some cases the form is established as a dialect standard, in other cases it represents a severe elision of have been—/v/ and /b/ are pronounced at exactly the same point in the mouth, so it /v/ very readily disappears in ...


11

An implosion is a region of low pressure collapsing because of the higher pressure surrounding it. That's clearly not what is happening when a balloon 'pops', as the sound that is produced is the high pressure air rushing into a lower pressure environment. Much like traditional explosives, when a balloon pops you have an area of concentrated matter ...


10

It's an expression that means to see a thing in its entirety, as a whole. To assess the OS not by looking at how individual parts work, but "how the parts work together and as a whole." It's to see things in a broad view.


10

"What is he?" could answered in several ways, depending on the situation: He's a runner. He's a goalie. That guy over there is a defenseman. He's Chinese, she's Canadian. He's a carpenter. He's a college graduate. He's an impolite jerk who thinks he's God's gift to the workplace. Indeed, "What is he?" can be used to ask about occupation, but it's a ...


9

Get it? Refers to the present Less colloquial (and arguably less brusque) Could be written: “Do you understand (now)?” Got it? Refers to the past (and the present) More colloquial (and arguably more brusque) Could be written: “Have you understood (what I just said)?” They are basically interchangeable. Some people would never say the latter because it ...


9

More natural is "John is getting his daughter ready for school" or "John is helping his daughter [to] get ready for school" depending on how much she's actually doing anything for herself. "Making ... ready" sounds archaic or military, and might be mistaken for "John is making his daughter get ready", which implies that he is forcing her to get herself ...


9

It's not rude at all to tell someone I'll let you know It either can mean you don't know or you haven't made up your mind. Less ambiguous is I'll let you know when I find out. since it means you don't actually know at the time you were asked. A short hand form might be When I know, you'll know. Which can mean when you find out you will tell them,...


8

How is it going? is the correct form, although it is usually abbreviated to How's it going? Dropping the it from the sentence makes it unclear what is being asked.


8

Gluttonous is impossible: it an adjective and cannot take the determiner a. Use the noun from which it is derived, glutton. But this is a very derogatory term (in fact, gluttony is one of the seven deadly sins!), and a doctor would never use this to a patient. Overeater is possible, but unlikely. To tell someone he is an "overeater" says that the fault ...


8

Your example shouldn't use "here", it should use "it". (Although "it" is non-specific, but people understand what is being refered to. Check my second example though.) It is too dark, Andy. Please turn up the lights. There is also "undim", but that's a little... clunky. It is too dark here, Andy. Please undim the lights. "Undim" could imply "turn ...


8

In a literal sense 'when I go to (a place) refers to the period of time that I am engaged in the act of "going" , not the time when I have finished 'going' and am now doing something else at the place. Colloquially and in everyday speech it also covers by implication the time you are at the place, and sometimes when you are returning from it, or related to ...


7

If you look up "suppose" by itself, you will get nowhere with this sentence; the words be supposed to must be treated as a unit. To "be supposed to" generally means that you are intended, expected, or obligated to do something: Definition of be supposed to (from merriam-webster.com): 1: to be expected to do something: - They are supposed to ...


7

There is no need for thanks. Here, thanks is a noun. There is no need to thank me. Here, to thank is a verb. In the same way: There is no need to be sorry. (verb) or There is no need for sorriness. (noun, though I doubt anyone would actually say this.)


7

They have similar definitions, but we tend to use them to mean somewhat different things, and in different situations. I don't have evidence for this, but as a native speaker, my sense is that we more often use abrasive to describe how a person is perceived by others, and to describe a relatively stable personality characteristic. Many people dislike ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible