93

In the context of running errands, go to (some place) is idiomatic speech, and it means more than the physical act of going to that location. So, when I “go to the store,” I don’t merely park in a parking spot and then go home; rather, I go into the store – presumably to purchase some items. Similarly, when you go to the dentist, you go inside and get your ...


20

"I am very sorry for your loss," is probably most common. You can elaborate if you wish, but otherwise this is simple and sufficient, especially if you are not very close to either the bereaved or the deceased.


19

Well, the first thing I must point out is that neither of these sentences are correct without an 'a' in them. It was a pleasure to meet/meeting you. As for whether you should use "to meet" or "meeting", it makes no difference. The meaning and usage is completely interchangeable. I would not recommend using "to have met you" except for specific ...


18

Your student is not wrong. Natively in American English we use "go" in this way. "Go" in most cases implies "to be" which means you don't have to specifically say you are in a place. "Go" also implies an action which is specific from context. When I go to the movies, I often buy popcorn. In this example, I will "go” (exist at) the movie theater with the ...


16

The expression goes back to days when most middle-class people bought shoes hand-cobbled to their own measure. These were of course more expensive than today's mass-produced shoes, and it was routine to extend their life by periodically replacing the ‘shoe leather’ which suffered the most wear—the heels and half-soles. This literal sense ...


14

Both more and else are syntactically fine in OP's example, and in many contexts they'll mean exactly the same thing. But note that idiomatically, What more do you need? is far more likely when what's being asked is effectively a rhetorical question (implying the speaker thinks you either don't or shouldn't need anything else). Also note that when using ...


13

As some of the comments have mentioned, it's not frequently used in English. I would say that, unless it's being used in a humorous way, the phrase is usually reserved for fine dining settings. In other words, if a bachelor friend of mine was about to eat a bowl of hastily prepared Ramen noodles, or if I was about to eat a hamburger with my nephew at ...


12

I would like to offer you my condolences or My condolences on the death of your grandmother Is how you would say that. If you actually knew person who died though, they would probably expect something more personal, to the tune of. I was so sorry to hear that your grandmother passed away, She was such a nice woman and I always enjoyed her company.


11

I agree with the suggestion offered by Happy & StoneyB; that is, you could simply sign your name with "Ms.", and hope that he notices and gets the hint. That said, your question asked about a good way to phrase it. I think the best policy is to be gracious and try not to embarrass the other party. As for the use of "female," you could use that, or you ...


11

Been is widely used in a number of British and American dialects as an abbreviated form of present perfect have been/has been. In some cases the form is established as a dialect standard, in other cases it represents a severe elision of have been—/v/ and /b/ are pronounced at exactly the same point in the mouth, so it /v/ very readily disappears in ...


11

I think your sentence sounds fine. However, the use of the noun fruits would sound strange to a native speaker in the context of how you've used it here. When you are talking about fruit in general then it's best to use fruit which is an uncountable noun. In some cases the noun fruits can be used as in the following example. My three favourite fruits are ...


10

It's an expression that means to see a thing in its entirety, as a whole. To assess the OS not by looking at how individual parts work, but "how the parts work together and as a whole." It's to see things in a broad view.


10

"What is he?" could answered in several ways, depending on the situation: He's a runner. He's a goalie. That guy over there is a defenseman. He's Chinese, she's Canadian. He's a carpenter. He's a college graduate. He's an impolite jerk who thinks he's God's gift to the workplace. Indeed, "What is he?" can be used to ask about occupation, but it's a ...


9

More natural is "John is getting his daughter ready for school" or "John is helping his daughter [to] get ready for school" depending on how much she's actually doing anything for herself. "Making ... ready" sounds archaic or military, and might be mistaken for "John is making his daughter get ready", which implies that he is forcing her to get herself ...


8

Gluttonous is impossible: it an adjective and cannot take the determiner a. Use the noun from which it is derived, glutton. But this is a very derogatory term (in fact, gluttony is one of the seven deadly sins!), and a doctor would never use this to a patient. Overeater is possible, but unlikely. To tell someone he is an "overeater" says that the fault ...


8

Your example shouldn't use "here", it should use "it". (Although "it" is non-specific, but people understand what is being refered to. Check my second example though.) It is too dark, Andy. Please turn up the lights. There is also "undim", but that's a little... clunky. It is too dark here, Andy. Please undim the lights. "Undim" could imply "turn ...


8

In a literal sense 'when I go to (a place) refers to the period of time that I am engaged in the act of "going" , not the time when I have finished 'going' and am now doing something else at the place. Colloquially and in everyday speech it also covers by implication the time you are at the place, and sometimes when you are returning from it, or related to ...


7

If you look up "suppose" by itself, you will get nowhere with this sentence; the words be supposed to must be treated as a unit. To "be supposed to" generally means that you are intended, expected, or obligated to do something: Definition of be supposed to (from merriam-webster.com): 1: to be expected to do something: - They are supposed to ...


7

There is no need for thanks. Here, thanks is a noun. There is no need to thank me. Here, to thank is a verb. In the same way: There is no need to be sorry. (verb) or There is no need for sorriness. (noun, though I doubt anyone would actually say this.)


7

It's not rude at all to tell someone I'll let you know It either can mean you don't know or you haven't made up your mind. Less ambiguous is I'll let you know when I find out. since it means you don't actually know at the time you were asked. A short hand form might be When I know, you'll know. Which can mean when you find out you will tell them,...


7

All three sentences are correct, but they can carry a surprisingly complex subtlety of meaning. "I'm going for [something]", in this context, means I am departing to do or obtain that something. In other contexts, it could instead mean I am attempting to achieve something ("I'm going for the record"), or I am choosing an option (given a choice of desserts, ...


6

Given it's Truman Capote, I hesitate to say the phrasing is "incorrect" - but it's certainly "non-standard". Most people would say... ...and I worry constantly about him falling. OP's rephrasing "I constantly worry him about falling" is unlikely English. In the original, to worry = to be concerned [about something], but to worry [someone] = to nag [...


6

This is a recurring problem in email conversations for people with Chinese names, as when only seeing the English transliteration and not the actual Chinese character of the name, it can be impossible to infer the person's gender. In some business conversation I encountered, people would add a hint to their email signature, for example Li Wei (Ms.) ...


6

How is it going? is the correct form, although it is usually abbreviated to How's it going? Dropping the it from the sentence makes it unclear what is being asked.


6

I would not use either phrase, to my ear both need an "a", thus: It was a pleasure to meet you. It was a pleasure meeting you. When the "a" is added then either can be used. Other related phrases include: It was pleasing to have met you. The consensus of comments suggests that "It was pleasing to have met you" is not commonly used. It seemed OK ...


6

In the context you have given, can mean different things. What more do you need? Can be taken as for example - "Isn't what is given enough? What else possibly could you need" implying that what is given should suffice. What else do you need? Can be taken as for example - "What are the other necessities that I can provide to you? What other ...


6

They have similar definitions, but we tend to use them to mean somewhat different things, and in different situations. I don't have evidence for this, but as a native speaker, my sense is that we more often use abrasive to describe how a person is perceived by others, and to describe a relatively stable personality characteristic. Many people dislike ...


6

Bon appetit is a salutation and can be said to a person who is about to start a meal, under any circumstance. No hard and fast rule regarding that. Even when a person joins you for a meal, it can be said. bon appetit is defined by Google as: bon appétit bɒn apɛˈtiː,French bɔn apeti/ exclamation used as a salutation to a ...


5

For 1) only: I hope you have enjoyed your stay. or I hope you have enjoyed your visit. or I hope you have enjoyed your trip. For 1) or 2) : I hope you enjoyed your stay/your visit/ your trip. In the first case, with the visitor about to leave, you can use either enjoyed or have enjoyed because while the visit is mostly in the past, it is ...


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