9

OP is mistaken in thinking that native Anglophones wouldn't say I will fly to London after 10 days. The only relevant factor here is that after [some amount of time] requires a context within which some particular point in time (past or future) has already been established. Thus... I'll go to Glasgow on December the 12th, and stay with my aunt. I will fly ...


5

This isn’t a correct way of saying only. In these cases, rather than saying ‘only’ you would say ‘alone’; I am at home alone. I am at the railway station alone. You could also say: I am the only person at home. I am the only person at the railway station.


4

Breaking it down: The vaccination was in April. You could get the booster after six months [had passed]. In other words, as of September onwards. Likewise: They will continue until 12 December, but will be reassessed after 10 days." That means as of 22 December, those measures will be reassessed. Anytime AFTER that. It is not specific. Those measures ...


4

We can use 'sounds familiar' to express tentative recognition. Person A: Have you heard of Peter Williams? Person B: The name sounds familiar, where might I know him from? Person A: He is an actor. Person B: Ah Yes! He was in a TV crime drama, wasn't he? Person B: Yes, he was in episode three of Thrilling Murder Stories. He played the detective. Also ...


3

"Was / Is it right.." is correct, although the exact meaning is slightly different. In the first form, the question is about you, if you were right or not. In the second form, the question is about the action of telling ("it"), if the action ("it") was OK or not. In the end, the overall meaning is the same, but the details are ...


3

I think the distinction here is when you start counting. "I will fly to London in ten days' time" means ten days from now, the time of speaking. If you want to start counting the ten days from some other point, you would use "after" (or "later"), for example "I will go to New York, then fly to London after ten days" ...


3

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, only can be used in two ways: as an adjective, meaning that there is a single one of something. as an adverb, meaning 'not more' When it is used as an adjective, it normally occurs before a noun: This is my only pen Adverb positioning is a lot more flexible, for example: Only a fool would believe his story! I only ...


2

Adjective clauses add detail, often serving to clarify or identify someone or something. As they are additional detail, they are often parenthetical. For example: My brother, whom you met last year, is coming home tomorrow. If I understand your question correctly, you are asking if the tense of an adjective clause can differ from the main clause. As you ...


2

In present simple, most people would say 'The committee splits over every decision', so the ambiguity doesn't arise. Some people understand 'committee' as plural (they say 'the committee are' or 'the committee were'). These people would probably say 'The committee split over every decision', so the ambiguity does arise. Another solution is more context: &...


2

There are lots of ways to do this: The committee is split... The current state of the committee is that it is split. The committee was split... It used to be split in the past. It may nor may not still be split. Grammatically this might mean that somebody split the committee, but context would usually make that clear. The committee has split... The ...


2

They are all fine (except the last one which is a little clumsy). As you said in comment, you feel that they have too many words. So go with the shortest one: I usually walk home from work. There's no need to say "walk back home", as this is what "walk home" means, idiomatically. And "walk" is more succinct than "on foot&...


2

If you mean "Does that sentence conform to the usage mentioned in OALD careful when/what/how? - yes, it does. It should be [Be] careful whom you hire, and, although whom is strictly correct for the object case, most people would say Be careful who you hire.


2

"Is it necessary to" is not a commonly used phrase. It could be used, but would carry an emphasis suggesting "Is it really necessary? is it required?" If you need to include an idea of "necessity," you can add it to the second example: "Is there anything else we need to prepare for our meeting?"


2

Rather than saying "English is acceptable", you should say "We can accept (emails in) English (and Chinese)". How much else you want to write depends on how chatty or formal your site wants to be. You can write more "We are happy to communicate with you in English", for example.


2

They are similar. If someone asked you, "Which animated films are appropriate for children?" you might say, "Those that are innocently naive, mischievous perhaps, but not threatening." 'Which' requests a subset and LSAT's sentence uses 'those' to delineate one. If you were asked to describe animated films that are appropriate for children,...


2

There's a fairly subtle difference in meaning here. After 10 days means that the measures are in place now, and their effects will be reassessed after having 10 days experience with them. If you say you will do something in 10 days, that implies that you are not doing it now, and won't be doing it until those 10 days have passed.


1

Generally, this kind of use falls into a commonly used phrasing: "[Action will be performed on Subject] after [Condition is fulfilled]" For example: "I will eat this apple after I have brushed my teeth" "The money will enter my account after proof of identification has been provided" The example in the OP is the same: "[The ...


1

Since this is an article about Austria, and I am Austrian, I guess there is something I can add as detail. I found quite the same statement in German (Austria's native language) at www.austria.info on 21st of November, so one day before the lockdown begins: Dieser Lockdown ab Montag, 22. November wird nach 10 Tagen evaluiert und soll spätestens mit 13. ...


1

Both your phrases are idiomatic and correct English, however, they are in a very casual register. In some parts of America (such as California), and for certain job types (such as "Blue Collar" jobs), a casual register might be used even in formal situations such as hiring a new employee. However, many people would consider hiring a new employee ...


1

That is not the way a fluent speaker would usually phrase that idea. "One soup" could mean "one kind of soup" but it would not normally be used for "one serving of soup". The idea could be conveyed by any of: I ate one bowl of soup today. I ate one serving of soup today. I ate one can of soup today. I only had some soup today. ...


1

Both are appropriate and reasonable in a professional or academic context. There are slight differences in formality level and connotation, but in this case it is unlikely to matter. "Reaching out" sounds a little more formal or distant, while "asking" sounds a little more familiar. Personally, I would probably write "reaching out&...


1

Your suggestions are both good. I'd prefer "asking me" over "reaching out", because it is simpler. Alternatives from comments: “Thank you for the opportunity.” "Thank you for thinking of me."


1

I'd write: Whoever reads this comment, I hope you achieve all the goals in your life and become a great person There are a few mistakes with this sentence, not the least of which being the one you mentioned. As gotube mentioned, "wish" doesn't make any sense here. You can say "I wish you all the best in achieving your goals", though.


1

The sentence is grammatical. Usually, you wouldn't say that an opinion is abrasive; rather, it may be expressed abrasively. You might say Some found her expression of her opinion abrasive.


1

"Should" with the perfect tense does usually imply that the action did not in fact happen, yes. But "should" with a simple verb does not always have that implication. It should be done. is better, and possibly clear enough in context. But another issue here is the ambiguity between "be done" as the passive of "do," ...


1

It's best to keep it simple. I like FeliniousRex's suggestion of "I think so." It shows that your position is mostly that it has been done, but also that you're not 100% certain. Some of the other options have potential for misunderstandings: "Is X's task done?" "It should have been done" —carries a suggestion of "It ought ...


1

The OP's example is completely understandable but, as @FumbleFingers in the comments suggested, it really needs the adverb badly The mess in your room reflects on you. The mess in your room reflects badly on you. (idiomatic) However, in this type of expression, the speaker is often expressing disappointment and is warning the listener that he or she is ...


1

If and when you need it, I will be happy to return the favor to the extent of my ability. You could use to the best of my ability. to the best of your ability PHRASE If you do something to the best of your abilities or to the best of your ability, you do it as well as you can. I take care of them to the best of my abilities. Collins


1

Isn't it a bit redundant? Yes, in that it would mean more or less the same thing without "nevertheless," but adding the extra word does add a bit of emphasis: it emphasizes the fact that the old system's flaws were not enough to make it less desirable than the new system. Also, note that "nevertheless" isn't a coordinating conjunction, ...


1

This is more about etiquette than English. However, "How do you do?" is a fixed greeting used mainly in Britain when greeting a stranger for the first time. The correct (formal) response is to repeat the phrase. The greeting is (or was) commonly used by the British upper classes, and a different response, e.g. "Very well, thank you", or &...


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