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2

Both are grammatically correct. And they mean the same thing. "There are not people like you at my school" might be considered a little awkward. I'd probably say "There are no people like you at my school", or "There are not any ..." like your example. But it's correct as is and would not confuse anyone. Side note: In your "bread" example, "bread" is a ...


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If you say, to the students at the other school, that there aren't any nice people like them at your school, you are saying something negative about the people at your school, but you are saying something positive or friendly about (and to) the people at the other school.


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No, to invoke something is to make use of it. It's a lot more effective to invoke a right if you do in fact have that right, but one can invoke a right one doesn't have, or have a right that one does not invoke. It's sort of like "I own an apple" versus "I eat an apple". If you're eating an apple, it's beset that you own it, but you can eat an apple you ...


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No, they're not the same. You could have the right to parley but not invoke it. Imagine for example the famous "you have the right to remain silent". The person being arrested has the right not to talk, but they might talk anyway. If they do not talk, they are invoking their right to remain silent.


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Let's look at the definition of the word, "invoke": to use a law in order to achieve something, or to mention something in order to explain something or to support your opinion or action. (Cambridge) Police can invoke the law to regulate access to these places. another definition: If you invoke a law, you state that you are taking a ...


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What you have written on the left side of your '=' is correct as to the meaning of invoke. That would imply a claim that what is on the right side of the '=' is true. Macmillan Dictionary: invoke These definitions from Macmillan dictionary are apt: 1: to use a law or rule in order to achieve something 1a: to mention a law, principle, or idea in order ...


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"Being ignored" is idiomatic. "Getting ignored" is a little awkward but most people would understand it and may not even notice anything "off" about it. As for frequency of use in BE, Google's NGrams has "being ignored" as roughly 300 times more common.


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There's not much difference, but I prefer the first for a couple of reasons. Firstly "end weighting" is the tendency to remember the last part that someone says. This means putting the information at the end of the phrase makes sense Secondly, if you "make X Y" it tends to mean that you changed X into Y. In this case you changed your username into "john95" ...


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Those are exactly the same in meaning and both are perfectly natural sounding to my native AmE ears


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It seems that "off" vs "off of" is largely a matter of preference and there is some debate about it. For example: https://grammarist.com/usage/off-of/ https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2009/12/is-off-of-so-awful.html It seems that "off of" is often considered either redundant or incorrect depending on who you ask. It also appears to be more common in ...


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