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In example 1, the choice of "this is" or "this was" has less to do with when you found it, and more to do with when you're showing it or talking about it. Either is fine, but probably you want to say "this is" if you're introducing this fact: "This is what I found: 4 new data points". You'd probably use the past tense if the information is no longer fresh ...


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Since the cause and effect are both conditions extending right up to the present time, the present perfect is correct for both, so the tenses in both sentences seem correct. As a matter of style, I think you could vary the verb forms by substituting "resulting" for "which has resulted" in the first sentence, and "depriving" for "which has deprived" in the ...


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The conditional aspect is irrelevant here. It doesn't matter that the clauses are embedded in a conditional construction. The relative clause is about the present time (it says "now") so it should use the present tense.


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If she wanted to please me, she would pretend that she was happy. If I were you, I would imagine I was going to pass the exam. You can't use were in the above examples, because that specific use of the verb "to be" belongs in the if-clause of a conditional. You can't use the present tense either, because you're still describing hypothetical or ...


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The right preposition is "in" for both sentences. You also say "in the third/eighth/etc grade". At least in the US, it is customary to refer to the years of a 4-year college degree by the following names: freshman year = first year sophomore year = second year junior year = third year senior year = fourth year Someone in their sophomore year in college, ...


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"I think we've met before" actually means that you are more certain than doubtful, so it's not a good choice if you're actually not sure you know the other person. "I think we met before" has the wrong tense for what you're trying to say. Here's one option - if someone looks familiar to you, but you're not sure whether you've actually met that person, you ...


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In scenario 1, it sounds like you are presently imagining or supposing what would happen in a hypothetical situation, in which case "imagine" and "suppose" should be in the present tense. If, however, you would only imagine or suppose something in the hypothetical situation, then "would imagine" and "would suppose" are correct. If aliens came to earth, I ...


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Both of these sentences are examples of conditionals, and these is a nice post about the different types of conditionals. The reason "if I didn't receive" doesn't work here is that you actually received the call, and the form of the conditional you need for an "alternative past" (where you didn't receive the call) is the one which utilizes the past perfect ...


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