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In the first sentence, the lack of a plural could emphasise that many of the shipyard workers are likely to lose their own livelihood. In the second, the plural could emphasise that many shipyard workers may lose all of their livelihoods, their collective livelihood, the one they share. However, semantically, I don’t think it makes a difference, at least ...


1

This is not grammatically correct. In its current form, you have three (plural) nouns right next to each other with nothing connecting them, which is pretty much never right. You need to start with one noun which indicates the actual (single) thing you are talking about, and then you can modify it with additional adjectives or possessive forms, etc. from ...


1

For sentence (1), either singular or plural could be used. It does not matter that "people" earlier is plural, because "people" is actually not the subject of that verb (it is only part of a sub-clause used to set the context for the main sentence). The core of the main sentence is actually: Wearing a medical mask in the community is not recommended. ...


1

The sentence as written means: The service called "Google Maps" is different in different countries. This could mean that the map looks different, but the differences referred to might involve other aspects of the service such as GPS navigation, local business listings, Streetview, traffic, or aerial imagery. So the subject of the sentence is not the ...


1

Knowledge is uncountable, and so does not normally take either an indefinite article, or a plural ending. Like other uncountables, it can sometimes be used as countable, when it refers to a specific instance or a particular type (I mention this for completeness: it's not relevant in your example) Means (in this sense) is singular, despite its -s ending. It ...


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