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1 vote
Accepted

"migrant worker population" or "migrant workers population"

Personally, I would reposition population. You already have two noun adjuncts UK and migrant that modify workers. The addition of UK qualifies which group of migrant workers we are referring to. The ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.3k
-5 votes

Why use the word "event" in singular form in the following context?

Maybe the mathematical notation helps? P( Xi | Xj ) for X ∈ {event1, ... , eventn | Xi ≠ Xj } For those who cannot read mathematical notations, this would translate into simple English as: "The ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 99
12 votes

Why use the word "event" in singular form in the following context?

Here some X means roughly “an unspecified X.” A few other examples of this usage are I don’t know why I’ve been so tired. Maybe I’ve caught some bug. When we left the restaurant, we saw some guy ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Difference in meaning between singular and plural in negative statements

It you signal, in some manner (tone of voice, italics in text), that you are deliberately using the plural ("don't have questions") to mean "more than one question", or if you ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
2 votes
Accepted

Is what I wrote one pattern or two patterns?

Your first passage describes a single relationship—the one between the increase of X and those of the other three—and the behavior of that relationship over time. Thus pattern should be singular. In ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

"depend on contexts" or "depend on context" or "depend on the context"?

"context" or "the context" would be equally acceptable. The word is treated as uncountable. In this case I don't really see any difference from adding the article. Omitting it is a ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
0 votes

The sales for the video games sector ARE (or) IS increasing? Why is "sales" a plural noun when it refers to the number of items sold?

Sale is a countable noun. Compare: Business is bad. We're doing less business In this instance the term business is uncountable and refers to the volume of sales. “Yesterday we made only one sale.” “...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.3k
4 votes

The sales for the video games sector ARE (or) IS increasing? Why is "sales" a plural noun when it refers to the number of items sold?

A sale is an event. To say that a sale is increasing is nonsense. The plural form "sales are increasing" would still be nonsense if it were understood in the same way. However the plural ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 7,057
2 votes

The sales for the video games sector ARE (or) IS increasing? Why is "sales" a plural noun when it refers to the number of items sold?

As all of the other answers thus far have mentioned, "sales" is a plural word, so it takes "are": Sales of anvils are dropping. Sales of rocket ships are rising dramatically. ...
John Q. Public's user avatar
1 vote

The sales for the video games sector ARE (or) IS increasing? Why is "sales" a plural noun when it refers to the number of items sold?

sales is the business and accounting term for what a business sells. And the verb should be plural: Sales [of whatever] were rising. the number of items sold is an explanation, not the grammar of the ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.5k
2 votes
Accepted

Noun(singular or plural) + collective Noun

Use the singular. If you use the plural when speaking, it sounds like you're making a possessive: Error group (group of errors) Error's group (group belonging to an error) In writing, student group ...
Kaia's user avatar
  • 883
1 vote

The sales for the video games sector ARE (or) IS increasing? Why is "sales" a plural noun when it refers to the number of items sold?

If you are reporting a sales increase and you are focusing on the number of items being sold it is usual to talk about “unit sales” as a natural number so that there is no ambiguity. “Sales” on its ...
Robert Davies's user avatar
0 votes

The sales for the video games sector ARE (or) IS increasing? Why is "sales" a plural noun when it refers to the number of items sold?

'Sales' is plural, so it's "are". If you use a singular noun (or noun phrase) then use "is". Sales are increasing Demand is increasing The number being sold is increasing
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
2 votes

"Teacher numbers" or "Teacher number" in England have/has increased over time - and why?

Use either "the number of teachers" (preferred) or "teacher numbers" (less idiomatic in most contexts)
James K's user avatar
  • 223k

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