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30 votes

Is it grammatically correct to use "them" with hair?

No, use "it" for sentences where we talk about somebody's entire head of hair. Use "them" for sentences about a small well-defined group of hairs, or about seperate hairs, in case ...
kngram's user avatar
  • 561
19 votes

Is it grammatically correct to use "them" with hair?

In this case you want it, not them. The word hair can be either an uncountable noun (also known as a mass noun) or a countable noun depending on context. You're using it as an uncountable noun in that ...
T.J. Crowder's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Plural and singular nouns: do "A cat is an animal" and "Cats are animals" mean the same thing?

A cat is an animal. Cats are animals. The meaning of these two statements is, essentially, the same. Of course, "a cat" is singular, and "cats" is plural. In most contexts, "...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
8 votes

"only one in seven make it" instead of "makes" -- why?

The actual subject of the second sentence is not clear because something has been omitted by ellipsis. Depending on what is omitted, we can use either make or makes. ... only one [climber] in ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
8 votes

How aircraft move? Or moves?

Aircraft is both singular and plural. Like sheep. If it is used in a way that could be singular or plural, the singular is denoted by use of an article. "How aircraft move through the air" Plural....
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
7 votes

Is it grammatically correct to use "them" with hair?

Nope, you refer your hair in a unit or in its totality, I think using "it" is most appropriate.
Kim Minh Nguyen's user avatar
6 votes

"Alternating between coffee and tea is" or "Alternating between coffee and tea are"

Alternating is a gerund noun (meaning the act of switching back and forth). So it's a singular subject, regardless of the fact that this particular "alternating" is further modified by the (...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
6 votes

Plural and singular nouns: do "A cat is an animal" and "Cats are animals" mean the same thing?

Logically speaking they are equivalent. A cat is an animal if and only if cats are animals, so both sentences can be used interchangeably. As you noticed yourself the difference is that grammatically ...
Imus's user avatar
  • 276
5 votes
Accepted

"Aren't" instead "am not" for first person singular

There are several possible contractions, none of which are acceptable to all speakers. The only thing that is fully acceptable to everyone is am I not?. The contraction amn't is used only in Scottish ...
user49640's user avatar
  • 389
5 votes

Could it be a structure of "How many -singular noun- is there?"

How many chair is there? This is not grammatically correct in English. "How many" refers to an unknown number, "many" refers to more than one.; "How many?" requires a plural verb. The correct ...
J. Taylor's user avatar
  • 1,398
5 votes

plural/singular question

In the first, I would probably say "are", but I would accept "is" as perfectly grammatical, treating "twenty gallons of" as a quantifier on the non-countable noun "paint". In the second, I would ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.8k
5 votes

Mile or miles? Singular or plural?

Adjectives in English do not change according to the plurality of the word they modify. So it will be mile if it is used as an adjective, which it is below. They took part in a 26 mile long ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
  • 36.9k
5 votes

"only one in seven make it" instead of "makes" -- why?

Because it is plural. "one in seven" is not a designation of one specific human who has ever succeeded in a climb (and thus being a singular). "one in seven" is instead a fraction of "group of ...
Matija Nalis's user avatar
4 votes

“during his freshman and sophomore {year/years}”

Since the freshman year and sophomore year are multiple years, this takes the plural, so "freshman and sophomore years" would be correct. "[D]uring his freshman year and sophomore year" would also be ...
Sophie Matthews's user avatar
4 votes

I want to mention a singular platform but imply impact of plural things. Can I use this in the sentence?

You would only say "these" if you had referred to more than one example. You said that you have mentioned a singular platform, so you should say "other platforms like this". The ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
3 votes
Accepted

plural/singular question

Twenty gallons of paint is needed to paint the house. is fine. Twenty gallons of paint would be considered a singular unit, as you said. However: Twenty one gallon cans of paint are needed to ...
user3169's user avatar
  • 31.2k
3 votes

Lemons are yellow?

Some say that "the lemon" refers to a definite, specific lemon. This need not be the case. It can legitimately refer to the class of lemons generally, especially in formal or scientific writing: "The ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 23.1k
3 votes

group noun singular or plural

Group nouns are a bit tricky in English. We call them "collective nouns,"* as they usually represent plural quantities. "Team" is a collective noun, as it represents a group of people. However, "team" ...
Sam K's user avatar
  • 375
3 votes

There's a quadruple circle

No In the first picture there are four circles. It isn't "a quadruple circle". A "quadruple circle" could be a circle consisting of four parts, each part being a complete circle. ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
3 votes
Accepted

What is the reason to not use s after a countable noun?

In English, the verbs “make” and “let” are followed by an object and the infinitive without “to”, for example: They can't make you work late. She made him do the exercise again. How do you make ...
Benjamin Harman's user avatar
3 votes

Arugula plural or singular?

Arugula is the name of the plant. It comes from an Italian dialect (arucola), which in turn comes from Latin (ērūca). So I believe the noun is singular and has no plural. You would say "five ...
Lucie Palmer's user avatar
3 votes

What is the difference between "a park" and "the park"

There is no rule that you use "a" on the first mention and "the" on the second mention. You use "the" when you have established a definite identity for the noun. You use &...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
2 votes

"Neither of which applies" or "neither of which apply"?

'Neither' is singular, so it requires a singular verb form (applies): ... (except for Sario Rips and allergies, neither of which applies here) If you had used 'BOTH of which...', 'both' is plural, ...
buzzard51's user avatar
  • 485
2 votes

Singular or Plural nouns

In your example, you will want to use the singular, I believe you are trying to say I have a blue car and a red car. I have a blue and a red car. I have two cars, one is red and one is blue ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
2 votes

If 'Social Media' is uncountable and plural, why do we say 'Social media is...'?

The term “social media” is both singular and plural in modern English usage. The word “media” is traditionally a plural because “medium” is the singular. However, in reference to things like the ...
Lanablogger1's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Singular form of dice

I'm not sure if it's "old-fashioned", but your inference is right. People just call it 'dice' even it's only one in number. This is the Google Ngram comparison for the usage of 'Roll the dice' VS '...
Varun Nair's user avatar
  • 8,268
2 votes

"To fly big passenger airliners calls for long training and experience"

Because when a noun is used as a modifier of another noun, it is nearly always used in the singular, even though you might expect a plural. Eg book club = club for discussing books hand drier =...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.8k
2 votes
Accepted

A specific sentence makes me confused on Singular and plural

a.2 Is correct because friends is the plural when you are talking about 2 of them. John and Sam are hard workers. b.1 Should be "John and Liza are a couple" because the word "couple" already means ...
earl3s's user avatar
  • 186
2 votes

What do you think this number refers/refer to?

Your understanding is right. A singular noun functioning as a subject takes a singular verb and a plural noun takes a plural verb. But nouns and verbs have different inflections. Plural nouns take an ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
2 votes

"They" to refer to a person's looks?

Well, since the subject is "looks" and it's plural, they is correct. Hence, your response, "No they haven't." is correct.
Sina's user avatar
  • 330

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