45

"Series" can be singular or plural depending on context. Both of your sentences are therefore correct but different. I like to watch TV series. uses series as a plural and means you like to watch a number of different TV shows. I like to watch a TV series. uses series as singular and means you like to watch one TV show.


30

No, use "it" for sentences where we talk about somebody's entire head of hair. Use "them" for sentences about a small well-defined group of hairs, or about seperate hairs, in case of an almost bald person. Hair can be used in several ways The word Hair is a noun that could be described as either countable or uncountable mass (material), ...


28

Because phrases that indicate the amount of sum, time, distance, weight, temperature, etc. are treated as singular: 10 million pounds is a lot of money. = This sum is a lot of of money. 50 liters of petrol fills my car. = This quantity fills my car. Five kilometers is a long way to walk. = This distance is a long way to walk. Fifty degrees is ...


19

In this case you want it, not them. The word hair can be either an uncountable noun (also known as a mass noun) or a countable noun depending on context. You're using it as an uncountable noun in that sentence, so you'd want it: My hair is short so I'm growing it for my wedding. You use it (and the singular form) when referring to a mass noun (or to a ...


14

Definitely not. Mail is a uncountable noun, as in: "There is a lot of mail in that mailbag." Therefore, it would be an avalanche of mail (but an avalanche of letters). We would say, "Would you please take this mail down to the mailbox?" even if there were three pieces of mail to take.


12

Nice Question. The word series is both singular and plural. Good information from thefreedictionary quoting American Heritage Dictionary as its source: Series is both a singular and a plural form. When it has the singular sense of "one set," it takes a singular verb, even when series is followed by of and a plural noun: A series of lectures is ...


11

Yes, it's quite common. It's non standard British English, akin to the "royal "we"". I use it sometimes myself, though I don't really know why. A couple of examples for you that I can hear myself saying: Excuse us When making my way through a crowd of people. (It's just me, though sometimes the "us" form sounds a bit nicer.) Do us a favour! Used in ...


10

A cat is an animal. Cats are animals. The meaning of these two statements is, essentially, the same. Of course, "a cat" is singular, and "cats" is plural. In most contexts, "a cat" would refer to just one cat. However, in the statement "a cat is an animal", a single cat is being used as an example that is ...


8

Let us compare two key sentences: There are ten beers in my fridge. Ten beers is a lot to drink. The difference is regarding the beers as individual items, versus a single numeric quantity (where "beers" serves as the unit, just like meters, seconds or kilograms). Similarly: The last fifty miles of that route are the most scenic! [Among the ...


8

Details is usually pluralized in such contexts. If there is only one detail, I would probably word it as, "See below for further information." The article is optional. There's nothing wrong with it, but it is usually omitted for the sake of brevity. You can have a look at this Ngram to see which is the more idiomatic wording.


8

The actual subject of the second sentence is not clear because something has been omitted by ellipsis. Depending on what is omitted, we can use either make or makes. ... only one [climber] in seven makes it to the top. ... only one in seven [of those who make the attempt] make it to the top. For the writer, the second version is the way that they ...


8

Aircraft is both singular and plural. Like sheep. If it is used in a way that could be singular or plural, the singular is denoted by use of an article. "How aircraft move through the air" Plural. "How an aircraft moves through the air" Singular. A definite article can be applied to the singular or plural (the plural potentially acting more like a ...


7

As I said in my comment on your question, the tricky part is quantifying how many doubts you are having. Sure, in your title here, you've said ONLY ONE (in capital letters). However, your sample sentence (the one I edited) initially read as follows: I have a doubt, a clear doubt. I'll pay you for this. Just snoop around my wife and find out whom does she ...


7

Be friends with is the ordinary English idiom: it expresses the notion that the friendship is not a relationship from one person to another but exists between two (or more) people. John and I were friends. I was friends with John. John was friends with Tom, Amy and Margie. When you are speaking of just one side of the relationship you may say: ...


7

Using "were friends with" is correct. The word friend gets pluralized when "friends with" alludes to a friendship between you and the other person: At Dartmouth, I was best friends with Sharon. At the reunion, I met a guy I had been friends with back in the 1980s. Why aren't they getting along? Bill used to be good friends with Ted. When you change ...


7

I usually hear plural come next: One and a half teaspoons of sugar, one-and-a-half pages of data, e.g. Also, you can switch to a singular noun if you reword the phrase: The play went on for another one-and-a-half hours The play when on for another hour and a half I found this usage note in Macmillan: When half forms part of a number, the most common ...


7

Nope, you refer your hair in a unit or in its totality, I think using "it" is most appropriate.


6

Information, news and equipment are uncountable nouns. You need to use an adjective of quantity before them such as - "a piece of information/equipment" or "some information or equipment". So options (a), (b) and (c) are wrong. Option (d) is correct because "means" means "method", which is countable. (That is, you can count the "methods").


6

Alternating is a gerund noun (meaning the act of switching back and forth). So it's a singular subject, regardless of the fact that this particular "alternating" is further modified by the (syntactically optional) element between coffee and tea.


6

Logically speaking they are equivalent. A cat is an animal if and only if cats are animals, so both sentences can be used interchangeably. As you noticed yourself the difference is that grammatically speaking one is singular and the other is plural. This only matters if you combine the clause with another one and they have to agree on plurality. Take the ...


5

If a box had contained twenty one-dollar bills, then one might say "twenty dollars were taken from the box" [note that the above might possibly written as "20 dollars", but not as "$20"]. If the box had contained a single twenty-dollar bill, however, the verb should clearly be singular. Further, unless the taking consisted entirely of one-dollar bills, the ...


5

In the first, I would probably say "are", but I would accept "is" as perfectly grammatical, treating "twenty gallons of" as a quantifier on the non-countable noun "paint". In the second, I would accept only "are", because "Three members of" cannot be a quantifier on "crew" or "staff". If you said "The three-strong crew" I would accept "is", though I would ...


5

Adjectives in English do not change according to the plurality of the word they modify. So it will be mile if it is used as an adjective, which it is below. They took part in a 26 mile long swimming race. It would take plural form if it was a noun. I ran for 26 miles. However: The race was 26 miles long. To be, being a copular verb, is special, ...


5

How many chair is there? This is not grammatically correct in English. "How many" refers to an unknown number, "many" refers to more than one.; "How many?" requires a plural verb. The correct question is: How many chairs are there? And What is the number of chairs Asks the same question without the need for "many" and the need for a ...


5

Because it is plural. "one in seven" is not a designation of one specific human who has ever succeeded in a climb (and thus being a singular). "one in seven" is instead a fraction of "group of people" - meaning 1/7 * x, or x/7 (where x is total amount of people (note: plural) that had ever attempted to climb Mount Everest. So, if there have been (let's ...


4

Fund and funds are two different words: Funds is an indeterminate, uncountable amount of money or currency. (Def.n 2 in OLD.) A fund is a countable noun meaning a collection of money to be used as payment or capital towards a certain purpose; account is a rough synonym. It offers no indication of how much money has been collected. The plural of this word is ...


4

"Us" for me is common in the north east (of England) particularly Co Durham Land of Prince Bishops. It's just an old English way of speaking. Many people say "us" but if they are writing will use the word "me". I was born in Sunderland and I use it some times, depends who I am talking to. If you listen carefully you may notice "us" meaning me sounds a ...


4

When should a word be singular and when should it be in plural when it comes to generality? They should usually be plural. "Man" is an exception. If you say "The man is explicable by..." it means we were talking about a specific man, and that he is explicable by nothing less than all his history. You should say: Men are explicable by ...


4

There are several possible contractions, none of which are acceptable to all speakers. The only thing that is fully acceptable to everyone is am I not?. The contraction amn't is used only in Scottish and Irish English. Most North Americans have never heard it, and unless I'm mistaken, most English people readily identify it as Scottish. The contraction ain'...


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