Hot answers tagged

45

There is nothing wrong with “cool” as an informal sign of approval. I disagree with the Urban Dictionary editor who said that it’s ugly. In fact, as far as informal words go, “cool” is quite a venerable example, since it has been in use since as early as the 1960s I suspect. The only reason I’d use “nive” — which I hadn’t heard of until now — would be if I ...


10

Urban dictionary has a definition for everything, the majority of words on UD have probably only been used by less than 10 people. I have never seen the word "nive" before and I doubt anyone you speak to will have either. The primary useful use for Urban Dictionary is to work out a new word that you see people actively using means and even then there is ...


6

The inventor of Python is a Dutch programmer named Guido van Rossum. "There should be one ... obvious way to do it./... Unless you're Dutch" is probably a reference to the inventor of Perl, Larry Wall, who is not Dutch. The Perl scripting language is well known for having many different ways to accomplish a task.


6

As a Brit I don't agree with David that it is ever used as an answer. innit is a monosyllabic teenage phrase, where every extra sound is terrible. Your second example is wrong, somebody who was saying innit would never say "lovely weather", and "right you are" is very old fashioned, so I have corrected your example Boy: Hot innit? Grandad in a ...


5

The number you are looking for is "411", pronounced as separate digits, "four-one-one". It means accurate or insightful information. It implies a desire for clear, correct, concise and relevant information, and might be used, for instance, if you are called somewhere urgently and want to know what's going on. It might also be used when asking about another ...


5

I think the source of that statement was mixing his idioms. I think he meant to say "cut the mustard" (meaning "to be adequate"), but he accidentally confused "mustard" with "cheese", with funny results -- unless he did it on purpose to be humorous.


4

In American English, suffix -ass is an intensifier (in informal contexts). It can be tacked onto an adjective to intensify either the speaker's approval or disapproval, or to underscore the speaker's stated opinion generally. That's a really bad-ass truck! That sentence expresses the speaker's approval of a truck, probably one with large wheels and a ...


4

Found Bill Withers' intro to the song here. His full statement is: Women can say stuff like, "I loved him, I really really loved him. But he just left. Why'd he leave like that?" Men, given the same situation, usually say somethin' like, "I'm glad the old jive broad split, man," knowing all the time that it's really killin' him inside. Here's the ...


4

To "chug" is to drink your beer in one go. This matches the gesture, which could be miming the act of lifting a glass of beer and "chugging" it. This is generally considered to be juvenile behaviour, typical of young men in student fraternities. You can imagine a group of students, one is drinking and all the others are telling him to "Chug! Chug! Chug!" It ...


4

Many have already told you why Urban Dictionary is not to be taken too seriously but... let's see what's happening here exactly. means cool. without actually having to say cool. cuz cool is an ugly word. First of all, notice that this definition is written in a very colloquial style. The first sentence doesn't even have a subject. No capitalization. Full ...


3

It's short for "homo", which is in turn short for "homosexual". Caroline cites gay stereotypes (good dressers, nice hair) and his lack of fulfilling them as evidence against Norah's assertion.


3

I have never heard the word "Abigail" used as a slang word for a best friend who understands everything. I have only heard it used as a person's name. I think that someone with a friend named Abigail created these entries in this "slang dictionary" as a way to please his friend. In other words, I don't think "Abigail" is actually a slang word at all, and I ...


3

The sentence is parsed as follows: (The ((old, jive) broad) split) In other words, the "broad" - who is "old" and "jive" - "split". All of these are used in a slang / colloquial sense: jive adj. Slang ... Misleading, phony, or worthless: talking jive nonsense. old adj. ... Used as an intensive: Come back any old time. Don't give me any ol' ...


3

One word used is burnout: Physical or mental collapse caused by overwork or stress. Oxford Dictionaries It can also be used as a verb (written as two words). If you're in the middle of the process you'd say you're burning yourself out. I have only ever heard this to refer to mental work, such as programming. You can browse the burnout tag on The ...


3

It means that they were really getting into the music, perhaps dancing and singing along, as opposed to just sitting in their seats, quietly enjoing the show.


3

You are not parsing that correctly. It's (local (copper))(inspector Slack). Copper is a slang term for a police officer. He is local in that he works in the area. Inspector is a rank of police officer. His name is Slack. He is a policeman in the local area, with the rank of inspector, and his name is Slack. It would be clearer if it were punctuated "...


2

You've not been robbin' it or something? In other words: You haven't been robbing it or something? As a representation of speech, an apostrophe is often used to replace one or more letters of a word. It's especially common to see it used to replace the g in the -ing form of verbs: robbin', goin', seein', tryin', cryin', and so on.


2

I would guess it's shorthand for "kitchen & bath", meaning the apartment has a kitchen and one bathroom.


2

The best definition I've found for "ass" in expressions of the form "X-ass" is from the Oxford English Dictionary: As the second element in compounds, forming adjectives with the sense ‘having or displaying the quality designated by the first element to an extreme or undesirable degree’ Etymologically, it is related to "ass" in the sense "butt".


2

Probably the closest is dilettante dilettante (n): A person who cultivates an area of interest, such as the arts, without real commitment or knowledge. This is not an exact match, because saying someone is a dilettante suggests they don't study something seriously. It can still work in context: My brother is a kind of dilettante who has earned every ...


2

Chilantu is a portmanteau word that has such a specific heritage and meaning, I doubt there is an equivalent in English. The words "pedant" and "loser" come to mind, but fall short of your complex definition. I suggest "chilantu" is a neologism that can also exist in English and serve its derogatory purpose there. (nb - "whose wife has deserted him")


2

I think in this anime, pisser, which is in quotation marks, might be a macho-related remark in Japanese, related to a man pissing outside the toilet bowl. However, that is a guess. As far as I know, pisser is not a gambling term. That said, it does work in the anime.


2

This entry that you are quoting has quite a few errors in basic English. I have never heard this usage. Consequently, I would not rely on this entry.


2

I did end up watching the scene in question (about 29 minutes into the movie on Netflix). Here *floss" implies the girl in question is excessively shallow (she is only concerned with herself, or silly and inconsequential things) so much so that that she could (metaphorically) slide between Norah's teeth, like a piece of dental floss. It's clear Norah ...


2

There are a few phrases you could try, some work better than others depending on the exact (fuller) context you use them in and the person to whom you're speaking/writing. You might consider: Hang in there Stick with it Don't jump ship just yet Give it some time Don't throw in the towel just yet Keep the faith a while longer


2

On the daily and on the regular are both slang phrases that mean on a regular basis. This English StackExchange discussion dives into on the regular a bit, and someone mentions on the daily in the comments. Both slang phrases seem to originate largely from hip-hop culture (or at least that seems to be their vector into the mainstream). Another example, ...


2

"You betcha" is typically heard in the American Upper Midwest,1 but perhaps some people outside of that region also use the phrase. Its meaning is essentially the same as the more common "you bet." Both are used to mean, yes or definitely. As with all replies to "thank you," it doesn't have meaning beyond a friendly acknowledgment of the thanks. In other ...


2

In dialects where it is used (northern Midwest of the United States, I think, and I believe it's in nearby bits of Canada as well), you betcha is a general all-purpose affirmative. In other American dialects, you bet fills the same role. In other English dialects, you bet has a much more restricted role, serving only to indicate enthusiastic agreement - ...


2

This is a shorthand. It is not typical of "normal" writing. On twitter people tend to write very short posts. They don't want to mention their child's name, for privacy reasons so use a shorthand way of mentioning someone without saying their name. You might see: 10 yo just watched ... K just watched ... (where K is the first initial of the name) DS ...


2

"Speed up" is the most general phrase I'd use: You do know there's a line of a dozen cars behind us? You should probably speed up. If you're looking for something a little more descriptive, then step on the gas give it some gas go faster move it However, if you want to tell someone to accelerate as fast as possible, then these work: ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible