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1

In Australian English, particularly Sydney street/jail slang, it definitely means something very different; if Mr White got got for his crimes, then Mr White would be bleeding to death on a prison yard somewhere. Full of puncture wounds, probably also badly bruised. And nobody saw a thing.


10

"Woah, there, horsey!" It's an idiom that means "hold on a second" or "something is happening" or "let's stop what we are doing and pay attention to this!" There is also: "Hold your horses!" which means "slow down!" And "Horse of a different color" which means "a thing to which what we were just speaking of does not apply". This is American ...


1

I agree with others that this is generally said by younger people for emphasis, exaggeration and creating excitement. "Basically" means they are presenting the information in it's simplest form, cutting out detail, and getting to the bottom line. A person will often begin a summary of some happening or event with, "Basically, ...". It can be used for ...


0

It's difficult to give a proper answer without further context. We need to know what exactly it is that they are saying they did. It's possible, as in other answers, that literally is just being used as an intensifier, as you have assumed. However, it is also possible it is being used in its original meaning. My default interpretation would be that "...


1

I agree with Em. that recently, "literally" has been used primarily for emphasis, especially by younger people. However, in cases where it is used for emphasis, I find you can drop it without changing the meaning of the sentence at all. In response to "Can you go pick up some bread?", "I literally just got back from the store" means the same as "I just got ...


23

The pairing of "basically literally" is very colloquial/informal and skews young. I hear it moderately frequently, mostly when people are recounting stories about personal interactions. It means "I am emphatic that my description conveys an accurate feeling of a moment/interaction, but it isn't literally true--I am exaggerating or simplifying for story ...


1

In our language (Japanese), as Juhaz says at the comment line, there is no verb which is directly equivalent with the verb "equal". For example, in your case, x=3 sin(α), we take as, (SOV case) Xはsin(α)の3倍と等しい。 Here, 等しいis equal with English verb "equal", plus we need to insert a particle "と" in order for the sentence to make sense. So naturally or not, ...


1

There is a common and correct way of reading x = 3 sin(α) x is equal to three sine alpha. The use of "equal" as a verb to say "x equals..." is relatively modern. The word "equal" is still mostly used as an adjective except in mathematical contexts. Given that a common colocation is "equal to", it is unsurprising that some people might treat the verb ...


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