58

See Diaeresis: The diaeresis indicates that a vowel should be pronounced apart from the letter that precedes it. For example, in the spelling 'coöperate', the diaeresis reminds the reader that the word has four syllables co-op-er-ate, not three, '*coop-er-ate'. In British English this usage has been considered obsolete for many years, and in US English, ...


28

There isn't a relatively simple explanation, I'm afraid. As you've pointed out, there are more exceptions-to-rules than than there are rules; however, there are some general guidelines that might help you: before double consonants before double consonants, 'i' is usually short regardless of its position in a word: as in bitten, hidden, miffed, bigger, piggy,...


20

𝑇𝐿;𝐷𝑅 'Lose' came from Old English (OE) word losian while 'loose' was taken from Old Norse around the thirteenth century. There was a process in OE through which s, f and th became voiced respectively to [z], [v] and [ð] when they occurred between voiced sounds i.e. between two vowels or a vowel and anther voiced sound. There was no phonemic contrast of ...


11

There isn't a hard-and-fast rule to determine which negating prefix to use; however, there's a very loose ‘guideline’1 that sometimes works: un- is usually prepended (attached) to Germanic words in- (or il-, im-, ir-)2 is usually, although not necessarily, prepended to Latin words Reproducible is derived from reproduce which is in turn derived from Latin ...


9

"Loose" has probably always been pronounced with [s] - the Norse word that it was borrowed from is spelt with double "s". "Lose" has been pronounced with [z] at least since Old English. (Between vowels, OE "s" was pronounced [z]. I use square brackets here because the s/z distinction in OE wasn't phonemically ...


7

In English you say "per mile" or "per second" or "per dollar" or "per person" or ... The phrase tells you to divide. I have never seen "perAnything" other than "percent". That does mean "divide by 100". So "35 percent" is an everyday way to say "35/100" or "0.35&...


5

My go-to source on the idiosyncrasies of English spelling has the following entry: English Pronunciation 1500 - 1700 by E J Dobson As the quoted entry says, the version with /ʃ/ arose as a dialectal pronunciation and then spread in other dialects. Dobson says that Cooper preferred the spelling licorish to liquorish which alludes to the fact that the latter ...


5

Old English, Middle English, and Modern English are almost entirely different languages. Old English and Middle English no longer have any native speakers, and are considered dead languages, studied only by historians and academics. Old English is not recognizable to Modern English speakers in any way today, except for maybe one or two words in isolation. ...


3

If there is such a thing as “Web English”, it’s definitely not what you are describing. The entities in a computer language are not English. They may look like English words to make it easier for people to remember them, but they are syntactically distinct. The background-color entity is no different than declspec or __init__. The only valid spelling of ...


3

"Demonopoloize" is the standard spelling. If you feel this is hard to read, because it seems to be "demon-opolize" you are free to use a hyphen to clarify the splitting: "de-monopolize". If you use a style guide, you can check to see which form it prefers, otherwise use what you prefer and be consistent. A similar example is &...


3

Use "breastfeeding". An ngrams graph is instructive: Prior to 1900, you nursed a baby. It is only with the development of powdered milk in the 1920s that the notion of "feeding with the breast" became a notion that needed a word, and the compound "breast feeding" was initially the most common. In the it became apparent that ...


3

Unreproducible or not reproducible. Note the corrected spelling.


3

They are different words spelled differently with different meanings. Hence they are pronounced differently.


3

artiste is mainly used for professional performers: A professional entertainer, especially a singer or dancer. (source: Lexico) while the word artist is applicable in many more situations, e.g. hobbyists, other types of arts or even outside the arts. As for the difference in spelling, artiste looks more French and hence more exclusive (at least to me). So ...


2

The -our spellings are more often used in the UK (and some other countries), while the -or spellings are more often used in the U.S. (and some other countries). Both are correct, but you should probably be consistent. Here is a brief discussion of the issue: https://qz.com/596395/the-case-of-the-missing-us-in-american-english/ You can probably reduce some of ...


2

Yes, see DRE (Diacritically Regularized English) by Alan Beale: Intro: http://wyrdplay.org/AlanBeale/DRE-intro.html Reference: http://wyrdplay.org/AlanBeale/DRE-ref.html Other links with additional info are available here: http://wyrdplay.org/reform-files.html There's also Annotated English by José Hernández-Orallo https://arxiv.org/abs/1012.5962 (click on &...


1

I cannot think of any words where y becomes its own syllable. Perhaps this is because it usually changes the last vowel, or combines with the last consonant to form a syllable.


1

Well, most dictionaries would agree on 'canonical' as the correct version. Merriam Webster, Dictionary.com, Oxford Learners Dictionaries


1

Different dictionaries use different symbols to transcribe the same sound. So you'll see different transcriptions such as: /ˈfɪzɪkəl/ /ˈfɪzɪkl/ /ˈfɪzɪkl̩/ /ˈfɪzɪkəl/ /ˈfɪzɪk(ə)l/ The last syllable is unstressed and has an obstruent (/t p k s z/ etc) followed by a sonorant (/l m n/ etc). When an obstruent is followed by a Sonorant in the same unstressed ...


1

I personally feel that Tmall global is a good choice for cross-border e-commerce, because it can face the large market of China, and many Chinese people have a special preference for imported goods. Even if you don't believe what I said, you can also judge whether it will be successful or not after entering the Chinese market according to the sales volume of ...


1

Syllabification is a highly controversial topic in phonology. There are many different approaches to syllabification and most of them sound nonsensical, but I'll give it a shot. Bear in mind that syllables are a unit of 'spoken language' and have nothing to do with spelling. The Oxford English Dictionary defines a syllable as 'A vocal sound or set of sounds ...


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