1

The first example is not correct, it should be "or", rather than "nor". "Do not do A or B or C, " for example, in a list. The second example, though grammatically correct, is not current conversational usage. There is nothing wrong with it, but it's unlikely to be heard in conversation today. Certainly, it's a classical pattern, as in, "Neither a borrower ...


1

"With" is often not stressed. And especially when followed by a word beginning in "th" it may be shortened. But the w sound (at least an exhalation of breath) should not be fully dropped, and in writing we wouldn't omit the "with".


1

It depends on what the speaker actually wants to say. A. I won't let you through with this. You can break (A) down like this: I won't let you [go] through [this metal door] with this (= the bomb/briefcase/belt). Compare this with I am sorry sir, but I can't let you enter the building with that gun. The speaker could also have meant this: B. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible