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It's unclear what you mean by ‘every final letter’ (and I wouldn't say every letter is dropped), but I'll start off by classifying English accents into two main categories: Rhotic accents: Rhotic accents are ones in which the R is pronounced in all positions (red, park, car; the R in all these words is pronounced). Most American and Canadian accents are ...


5

Customer - Yes. A shop clerk usually doesn't know the name of the customer. Using "sir" is a polite way to address a customer Teacher - Perhaps. It depends on the culture of the school. It is also common to use Mr or Ms with the teacher's last name. It is common at High School but rarer at university, though you may use "Professor". It ...


5

There are a number of regional British accents which do not do this, in a variety of ways. This basically applies to consonants which are omitted, altered, or replaced with a glottal stop. Much of Britain will pronounce words ending with "ing" as "in"; so "I'm going out" becomes "I'm goin' out". (You'll often see it ...


3

The words sir and ma'am are quite common in the US. Ma'am is the way we usually pronounce madam and has been for a long time. Most Americans are surprised to learn they are the same word. If you are being polite, you will use sir to address any unfamiliar man over the age of 18 or so. You will use miss to address any unfamiliar woman between roughly 13 and ...


2

Apart from words ending in r, there are not many English words where the last letter is a single silent consonant. Many of those come from other languages, for example ballet, valet. Some words have a consonant combination where only one is sounded, eg lamb, crumb, rock. The final consonant combination ng (as in running) represents a single sound and it is ...


2

The context of the full quotation helps here. Hastings is crossing the Channel, from France to England, and can't relax on the boat, instead saying "from the moment I get on board, I feel that the time is too short to settle down to anything." Then he tries to explain how he feels. Perhaps all this is merely a legacy from one's short leaves in the ...


1

It looks like an expression she made up for "skin with fine wrinkles, so it looks like pages from a book". Not a standard expression, but the meaning is obvious from the video. She shows you wrinkled skin and says it is "book skin" - so now you know what "book skin" is, it is that thing that she shows you.


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"Blow up" is a phrasal verb, "over social media" is a prepositional phrase. "Blow up over" isn't a thing The meaning of "blow up" is related to explode, but figuratively. It means "become much worse very quickly" and "over social media" tell you how, or where, that occurred. There was an "...


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