3

"During" means within that time period, simultaneous with it. "Throughout" means over the whole duration, from start to end. The action does not have to be continuous or constant, but it has to take place one or more times over the whole time period. Note: in weather reports, meteorologists have a somewhat specialized jargon, and they ...


2

Japanese textbooks do like to make up rules for politeness that don't really exist. If you can reach the salt without interrupting another person's eating, it's not rude if your hand is in front of other people. This isn't some kind of special rule that needs to be explained to Japanese people. It is no more rude for English people in England than it is ...


2

Both: "How do you go to school?" and "How do you get to school?" are grammatically acceptable. The Cambridge dictionary has a page about "get vs go", including warnings and arguments can be made for why each sentence is preferred by some over the other, but both sentences are used commonly where I live (I was born and raised ...


2

The Lexico example that you quoted in your comment is correct because "over the parking lot" says that the window looks out over the parking lot. The sentence in your question is not correct because the guy doesn't have a vantage point over the garden- your balcony does, and you do. You usually to use this meaning of over with the verb look rather ...


1

The "put up" is not a usual form. It would probably be understood by most English speakers. You might choose to say "pull up" or "type in" or any of several other forms. There are lots. Heh heh. Maybe you want to say you were driving your car with your friend in the car. You were giving your friend a ride home. I don't suppose ...


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