5

It's an accent feature. Look up the wine-whine merger Basically it means that some people, depending on their specific accent, still use the "hw" pronunciation, although in countries such as the US it seems to be diminishing. Most of the UK has undergone the merger, except for Scotland and Northern Ireland (and perhaps the Republic of Ireland, which isn't ...


4

I would say it's not wrong, the place is describing a location, that in this context was identified by its relation with the bed. However it isn't seem to bring significant meaning to be additioned in the sentence, thus just: Have you already swept under the bed? or maybe Have you already swept the floor under the bed? could express the same idea ...


2

If you are talking about a dress shirt, the bottom of the back is actually called the "tail" or "shirttail": There is a cut in my shirttail. The 'bottom' of most garments is called "the hem", or possibly "the fringe" (the latter is a little old-fashioned), so you could say: There is a cut in the hem of my shirt, at the back. "Top left", and "bottom ...


1

I would like to think I have a fairly large vocabularly, including those fashionably 'obscure' words, borrowings and neologisms that regularly do the rounds (like petrichor, hygge or sonder) - but until reading your post just now I have literally never heard or seen any of these words before. Googling them, it appears that noceur is French, meraki is Greek, ...


1

...stitch it up and stitch it down. In usage, these examples (up and down) do not show the direction of movement of the needle. These two idioms are understood to mean "repair" [up] or "secure" [down] something that needs closing or tightening. "I need to stitch it up before I can wear this torn shirt." "The shirt pocket is falling off, so I will stitch ...


1

They're all quite informal phrases, so it's difficult to explain why they mean what they do. They just do! Taking your main example, I found one online dictionary definition which says the phrase is: used when one is about to try doing something new, difficult, or unpleasant That's not bad, but I would add a little more. If someone said to me, "Here ...


1

Short answer - no. It is true that "what's up?" can be a way of asking someone who appears distressed or upset if they are alright - so in that sense it can be used to determine if there is a "problem". However, in most contexts, "what's up?" and the slang abbreviation "'sup?" are idiomatic ways of casually asking "how are you?". Like the similar "what's ...


1

Your question asks how to identify the right pronunciation, but your body asks about the reason why pronunciation varies. As for the latter, there are multiple explanations why, and they are probably beyond the scope of this site. As a short answer though, we might observe that "chord" comes from the Latin chorda whereas "chore" comes from Old English ...


1

A loving relative would probably respond differently from a stranger to being thanked. A person in a business or formal situation might say one of a number of things, such as 'you are welcome', 'that's OK', 'don't mention it', etc (I don't like it when people say 'no problem'). However, there is no 'rule' governing what a fond grandmother has to say to a ...


1

I think most English speakers are not necessarily knowledgeable enough about trees to be able to tell the difference between pines, spruces, or firs on sight, so in general people don't make that sort of distinction unless it's actually relevant to the conversation. When in doubt, most people will use "pine" as a generic term for most small/medium conifers, ...


1

The specific expression "go over big for" is not that uncommon, but also, I think, a bit of a special case. It is, in my opinion, sort of a cross between "to go for" (to be interested in) and "to go over big" (to be enthusiastically received), so it essentially means "to become enthusiastically interested in (something) when it is presented to (some group ...


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