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If we start by splitting the question in two, you could answer as follows. Person A: How far can you throw the ball? Person B: I can throw the ball five metres. Person B: I can throw the ball a distance of five metres. Person B: I could hit an object that was five metres away (from me). The first of these options is the most natural, but ...


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This is purely anecdotal, and not even based on particularly careful observations of my own or others' speech (Australian English, for what it's worth). But I think that /juːsta/ is likely to be found in isolation, sentence-finally, or before other breaks, and /juːstə/ in other positions. This is not dissimilar to pronunciaton of "to" itself as /tu/ versus /...


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You could easily use gather. Accumulate is a little bit more formal, but would also get the point across. You might also want to think about using the verb to pool as in Pooled rain water will easily become a breeding ground for mosquitoes.


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When the contraction of you are, that is, you're is said fast in a sentence, it sounds like the e in the interjection er preceded by a y: yer. This is typical in American English. This is not a true phonetic or phonemic description.


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I would phrase it as "He may look rude, but he is very kind on the inside. Though from your choices internally would be the better one. "From inside" is a direction from inside to outside. So for a sentence like "They heard a sound from inside the barrel" It's the sound that moves from inside the barrel to outside (where the listener is). "Internally" is ...


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I am done like I am finished (frequently shortened to I'm) is typical conversational English. It's possible to add any number of gerunds, as in swimming, working, eating, sleeping and so on. Alternatively, you can use have in the place of am, generally shortened to I've. The meaning is the same. But with have, you can finish with a noun/noun phrase as ...


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"Go" can be used in the sense of "say". Although technically a balloon cannot talk or say something, we can think of this as an extended sense. This is very common. But as Garner (2015) note, it is non-standard at best The use of go as a synonym for say is seemingly part of every American teenager’s vocabulary (“So I go, ‘Whattaya mean?’ and he goes, ‘...


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