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1

You could easily use gather. Accumulate is a little bit more formal, but would also get the point across. You might also want to think about using the verb to pool as in Pooled rain water will easily become a breeding ground for mosquitoes.


-1

"Situated" and "located", like all words in English, have slightly different meanings, in some contexts, but in your example I can't see even a minor difference between your three choices. For that reason alone, the last (shortest) one is most likely to be used in both written and spoken English, though the first two (longer) options are more likely to occur ...


0

The lecturer is Canadian, with a subtle but noticeable accent to me as a midwestern American. The thing you're noticing appears to be part of his dialect; you're not imagining it, although I probably wouldn't have noticed it myself.


1

When the contraction of you are, that is, you're is said fast in a sentence, it sounds like the e in the interjection er preceded by a y: yer. This is typical in American English. This is not a true phonetic or phonemic description.


0

No. another same doesn't work. The idiomatic expression here would be: You have to wait the same length of time again. "Again" here doesn't just mean "one more time": it is a more or less fixed expression the same time/length/amount/cost again, meaning "as last time": exactly what you wanted to convey by "another same amount" I think.


0

There's not really a common, clear, and concise way to say this in English. Some options are to simply give the time: (you have to wait for) another five minutes. or, somewhat ambiguously: (you have to wait) as long as you've waited. or, precisely but verbosely: (you have to wait) as long as you've waited, again. or giving the time and the ...


0

Your proposed sentence is an appropriate way to describe placing on its side in the morning, though note that in this case, 'put up' is being used to mean 'put away,' i.e. store in a non-usable state/position between uses. This meaning of the phrase is relatively common, but somewhat idiomatic, as it does not (normally) refer to actually lifting the object ...


1

I would phrase it as "He may look rude, but he is very kind on the inside. Though from your choices internally would be the better one. "From inside" is a direction from inside to outside. So for a sentence like "They heard a sound from inside the barrel" It's the sound that moves from inside the barrel to outside (where the listener is). "Internally" is ...


0

Don't use internally, as it suggests something being physically inside the body, like our internal organs. You can use inside (not from inside) metaphorically to refer to personal qualities which are not obvious unless you know the person well.


1

I am done like I am finished (frequently shortened to I'm) is typical conversational English. It's possible to add any number of gerunds, as in swimming, working, eating, sleeping and so on. Alternatively, you can use have in the place of am, generally shortened to I've. The meaning is the same. But with have, you can finish with a noun/noun phrase as ...


1

"Go" can be used in the sense of "say". Although technically a balloon cannot talk or say something, we can think of this as an extended sense. This is very common. But as Garner (2015) note, it is non-standard at best The use of go as a synonym for say is seemingly part of every American teenager’s vocabulary (“So I go, ‘Whattaya mean?’ and he goes, ‘...


2

If we start by splitting the question in two, you could answer as follows. Person A: How far can you throw the ball? Person B: I can throw the ball five metres. Person B: I can throw the ball a distance of five metres. Person B: I could hit an object that was five metres away (from me). The first of these options is the most natural, but ...


0

Most native speakers would know the word "dozen" so there would be no need to ask about it. The most likely question is "What does dozen mean". However suppose that we know that dozen represents a number, but we don't know which number. You could ask "How many is a dozen?" There is no need for "units", but as noted this is not a natural question to ask. ...


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