New answers tagged

0

There is a basic rule here for English learners: ed has three different pronunciations in English based on whether the final consonant is voiced (using the vocal chords) or unvoiced (not using them) or a separate syllable. For example: Here are the rules: The /t/ sound If the last consonant of the word is voiceless, then the ED is pronounced as a T. Be ...


0

No - you shouldn't drop these sounds. If you dropped the -ed sounds from the end of "expressed" it would sound like "express", which is the wrong tense and the sentence would sound grammatically incorrect. Let's look at your first example: The government has expressed support You're asking if you can drop the hard sound because it '...


0

In casual speech glottalisation of /t/ (its replacement with [ʔ]) - in at least some positions - is far more widespread that AAVE or Cockney (the varieties that have been cited). For instance, I believe Wikipedia is correct to state that: In RP, and in many accents such as Cockney as well as all American English, it is common for /t/ to be completely ...


1

In some cases, /t/ and /d/ (alveolar stops) decay to [ɾ] (alveolar tap), which may be difficult for you to hear since it’s a less distinct sound and not the one you’re expecting. As a native speaker, I can still hear the difference between “I talk with” and “I talked with”, or between “burn the toast”, “burned the toast” and “burnt the toast”, etc., but the ...


0

I mean, there aren't much differences between those 2. However: Someone is sitting next to me. Only means that someone is actually sitting close to you ("next to you"). While: Someone sits next to me. Could means that someone is sitting next to you, someone is actually sitting (the time you are speaking) next to you or could also be a must for ...


2

Canceling them out is close but not quite enough. Here are your examples with one small tweak: I will only study with you. I can only finish this project with you. Eat only with me. The only way to do this is with taking risks. I only play this game with him. The “only” is necessary to invert the sentences from double-negative to positive without ...


1

As you say, in this case, the presence or absence of not doesn't change the meaning. I can't spar with my dead brother unless he climbs out of his grave gives the meaning, but sounds a bit flat, as though his leaving his grave were a likely occurrence. (Compare You can't travel by train unless you buy a ticket.) I can't spar with my dead brother - not unless ...


0

Unless is used to describe something that will happen if something else doesn't happen. For example, "I will walk to school unless it rains," which means that I will walk to school if it does not rain. "Not unless" is a little more situational. You would probably only use it if asked a yes/no question, to which the answer is "no"...


0

Although your meaning is clear in each of these, none of them are actually natural English. Instead, try: Recently, I have been practicing more. or I've been practicing more than I had previously. or I have recently been practicing more than I used to. You do not need to use both 'recently' and 'in the past' to make that comparison. The placement of '...


0

“Come and go” (or “on and off”) can be used to describe intermittency of a normally continuous condition. A single hiccup is not a continuous condition like a fever, but hiccuping or hiccups are, so the expression works.


0

Your example is a statement question, which means any question with the grammatical structure of a statement but a question mark (in writing) or rising tone (in speech) that otherwise indicates a question. They are commonly used to express surprise at or disbelief in what the other person said or did; you are literally questioning it by stating it as a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included