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/a/ is an open front vowel, meaning the mouth is open and the tongue is positioned in the front of the mouth. It's one of the cardinal vowels and according to Wikipedia, it's not directly intended to correspond to a vowel sound of a specific language but rather to serve as a fundamental reference point in the vowel chart. It's often associated with the TRAP ...


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It can add up. Add up is being used in the sense of addition — the cost of the food will sum together to a high total cost.


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It depends on what you want to say. In this context "it can add up" means "Over the course of time, this is going to start to get more expensive than we would like." Contrarily, "it can't add up" would be used if you want to say "It must not be allowed to get as expensive as that." Alternatively, "it can't add up&...


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This is a subtle thing - hard on means something had effects that were difficult for the person to deal with, or which had a negative impact on them at least. It was hard for him means that it was a difficult process, something he had trouble with. Now those two meanings have a lot of crossover, so you can often use them interchangeably, but I assume the ...


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The expressions are "difficult for him" and "hard on him". Your friend has mistakenly mixed the two expressions together to create "difficult on him". If we say "difficult for him" it means that he found a task challenging, that it required more than the usual effort. If we say that an experience was "hard on him&...


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The expression "Just him and me" doesn't contain a verb, so questions of whether something is subject of the verb or not are unanswerable. The basic form in English is the object form. In reduced expressions where there is no verb, we use the object form. Mum: Who wants some ice cream? Child: Me! (but Child: "I want so ice cream", or &...


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As the comment by FumbleFingers says, the most correct ways to phrase this would be: Just him and me. (object form) Just he and I. (subject form) However, the distinctions between "he" and "him" and between "I" and "me" are ones that native speakers are often careless about, particularly with complex subjects or ...


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