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7

These words are homophones. If you are attempting to distinguish them by sound you will fail, as there is no difference in sound (there may be differences in some dialects, but none that I am aware of) So these words are homophones. They have the same sound (but different meanings) It is appropriate to call these words homophones. You can distinguish ...


2

Marge says, "Well, kids, isn't that an informational fact?" https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=the-simpsons&episode=s20e14 It is an example of a redundant statement, which, to me, belies the nature of Marge's character. She is as disinterested in the history as her children, but feels she must encourage their ...


1

Some question forms in English: Present Tense Do you move your car everyday? Where do you live? Interrogative: do/does, the subject and the verb. Past Tense (Simple Past) Did you move your car yesterday? Where did you live in New York? Interrogative: did subject verb When did you move to NY? [simple past tense] When do you move to NY? [meaning: when ...


2

"She is 10 months (old)". We count in months up to 1-year-old. From then there is mixed usage. It is very common for people to say "She is 18 months old", but you will also hear "She is 1 year and 2 months" or "She is 1 and ¾". For children who are 2 or older we likely to just say "She is 2 (years old)", but sometimes "She is 2 and a half". For very young ...


3

That might be a question of style. I would use "an" since I will read through the parenthesized text, and the meaning is perfectly clear. An (imaginary) point . . . If necessary you could avoid it with A point (possibly imaginary) . . .


-1

Whilst it is a joke nowadays, it’s because before Dr Johnson wrote the dictionary, there wasn’t any correct way of spelling something as there weren’t any rules to our spelling, hence why our phonetics don’t tend to make much sense. For example if you look through Shakespeare’s original scripts you’ll find that he spells his own name in different ways as ...


0

Yes, either of "take up" or "pick up" are often used in this situation. We'll pick up tomorrow from where we left off. I think it sounds better to use an object with "take up" We'll take this up tomorrow from where we left off. Son: Dad, can we order pizza for lunch? Father: Take it up with your mother. If it's fine with her it's fine with me....


1

The sentence is written in a conversational style, even though it is in a respected publication like Smithsonian Magazine. You can tell this because of the contraction "let's". Many people were taught in school that contractions should be used in speaking (and dialog) but not in formal writing. The word "geography" is functioning as the object of the ...


-1

It does not sound correct to me. try "thanks for making me feel like it's been a help" if the help has already been received. "thanks for making me feel like it's helping" if the situation is on going


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