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16 votes
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What is the difference in meaning between "I think" and "I am thinking" in the sense of having an opinion?

Verbs of inner state, unlike most verbs, do not normally take the progressive in English. So I think (I feel, I believe) are the ordinary unmarked forms. When they are used with the progressive, ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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9 votes

What is the difference in meaning between "I think" and "I am thinking" in the sense of having an opinion?

We often prefer to use the present simple rather than the present continuous with verbs describing states such as “think”, “agree”, “hope”, “know”, “look”, etc. However, we can use the present ...
Prince ßádhWoloski's user avatar
6 votes

Why is "I'm knowing" incorrect?

Verbs can be considered to be either action verbs or state verbs. Action verbs, are the verbs used to convey an action, eg run, jump, dance, fight, etc. State verbs, however, usually do not convey an ...
James's user avatar
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5 votes
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What is the subtle difference between "I hope" and "I'm hoping"?

It is only a rhetorical difference. The "I'm hoping" refers to an emotion that is currently in progress. So this adds "immediacy" to the sentence. You are referring to feelings ...
James K's user avatar
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4 votes
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is the verb "lie" in the sense of telling lies always stative?

Some writers use the simple present in places where a contemporary native speaker would use the progressive in order to give the words of their characters a somewhat antique feel. "You're lying" ...
TimR's user avatar
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4 votes
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Does "He started remembering" breach the laws of english grammar?

As far as I know, REMEMBER is a state verb and can't be used in continuous form. It's not that they can't be used in continuous form. Refer to the following explanation which is more helpful: "...
Brandin's user avatar
  • 577
4 votes

Can the verb "be' be a dynamic verb?

Yes - in certain contexts, 'be' can also convey a dynamic sense when used in the continuous or progressive form as you stated - "is being," "are being" etc. In these cases, it ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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3 votes

Which verb form to use before 'understanding it'?

The -ing form would be unusual with understand, but I wouldn't go so far as to say that it is ungrammatical or unidiomatic in all circumstances. You would be drawing special attention to the ...
TimR's user avatar
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3 votes
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"She has all the things" in the passive

If you change the verb then you won't have the passive voice of that specific sentence. In fact you may not end up with a passive sentence at all: All the things belong to her. Neither passive nor ...
Laurel's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the difference in meaning between "I think" and "I am thinking" in the sense of having an opinion?

"I think that A" means it is my opinion. "I am thinking that A" often means I am considering A. This is an extension of the literal meaning, that in my mind at the time of speaking is the idea A. The ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 7,547
3 votes

'Knowing' a stative verb?

?They might not be knowing it. Because to know is stative, the sentence above is at least questionable, if not simply unacceptable. This is why I said that knowing the meaning of it is hard. This ...
Gary Botnovcan's user avatar
2 votes

I know him. He is known to me

He is known to me. Known here is a past participle functioning as an adjective. It is not a passive construction What your sentence means is To me, he is known. Compare this with an ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
2 votes

difference between "He was dead by the time the doctor arrived" and "He had been dead by the time the doctor arrived"

The perfect aspect is a narrative device which enables the person telling a story to mention at a certain point in time an event which happened earlier (in a flashback). In sentence 3, the time is ...
user58319's user avatar
  • 282
2 votes

"He is good looking" vs "He is looking good"

In the first sentence, the word looking is called a gerund. A gerund acts like a noun. The word good is an adjective in this sentence, and it is modifying the noun. The sentence means that he is a ...
Arch Denton's user avatar
2 votes

Owning something temporarily

Syntactically, you’re fine. If you were doing anything else for a period of time, during that interval you could say, “I’m x-ing it.” “I’m eating it.” “I’m wearing it.” Semantically, the word ...
Michael Lorton's user avatar
2 votes

What is the appropriate tense for factual statements after a stative verb in the past tense?

Both are possible. Normally the tense would match: I believed cats were evil. However, if you want to emphasise that you believed something that was unchangeable you could use the simple present: ...
James K's user avatar
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2 votes

Can Present Perfect with a stative verb be used to describe a finished action?

As with so many "rules" about English grammar and usage, this one isn't in fact a rule. I have liked pasta since I was a baby. implies that the speaker still likes it. However, the sentence: I ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
2 votes

Is "become" both stative and dynamic verb

Become is a contraction of come to be, which is a general Inchoative (change of state) predicate, like start, finish, end, begin, and continue. He became tired ~ He came to be tired - He was not ...
John Lawler's user avatar
  • 2,840
2 votes

Which verb form to use before 'understanding it'?

Like TRomano said, you don't usually find "to understand" used this way. Understanding usually isn't referred to as an ongoing even with the -ing ending. I think that, as you said, it's a stative verb....
Joe Pinsonault's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

"I see" vs. "I am seeing" in the sense of receiving information through the sense of sight

Verbs of sensation or inner state are usually used in the present simple, as you say. But they can be used in the continuous, putting emphasis on the fact that the seeing (or whatever) is going on ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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2 votes
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'see' in continuous form to express having a romantic relationship

The question is: In which of these sentences are Camille and Philippe in a romantic relationship? The verb ('are') is in the present tense, so we need to find which of the two sentences discusses ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Which one of the present simple and present continuous to use with stative verbs?

English grammar is often not very logical, and the "rules" which are used to teach it are often more guidelines, and frequently do not capture all the nuances of the grammar and usage that ...
David Siegel's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Why is the present continuous possible here? (look)

"You are looking good" is a fixed phrase, almost an idiom. It is used to indicate that the person's appearance is positive at the current moment, thus the present continuous is appropriate, ...
David Siegel's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Why is only the present continuous appropriate here?

(1) I hear you do OK for yourself. sounds to me slightly odd. In the absence of context I would suspect it of being from a speaker of British English. But I have heard this exact cform ""do ...
David Siegel's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Why is the present simple not possible here? (cost)

A sentence such as: This weekend costs me a fortune. using the simple present is indeed not usual. Possible alternates would include: This weekend has cost me a fortune. This weekend will cost me a ...
David Siegel's user avatar
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2 votes

The hill was covered by/with snow. [dynamic or stative]

There really isn't any difference in meaning, and both could be used in the same situation. The use of such expressions be used to describe a snow-covered hill. You could probably force a "...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote
Accepted

Is the word 'remind' is stative verb? (remind vs. reminding)

Both are correct, and identical in meaning. As a response to something another person has just said, it is more common, especially in American conversational English, to use "that" as the subject, ...
BadZen's user avatar
  • 3,729
1 vote

Is "become" both stative and dynamic verb

I do not know what do you mean by dynamic but I think you mean action verb and a state verb Become can be used in the progressive forms and other forms too.So it can be a state verb but may not ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
1 vote

Stative verbs with present perfect simple

You can't use stative verbs with present perfect progressive. "I have been knowing…" is not possible. That is probably what you mean. Like Jason said "have you known" is used with duration, for ...
anouk's user avatar
  • 3,954
1 vote

Doubt about "be/get used to + stative verbs"

"Understanding" is a gerund in this sentence and must be written with "-ing." I am used to understanding people when they speak. (I replaced "while speaking" with "when they speak" to clarify who ...
Tashus's user avatar
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