New answers tagged

0

"I can't find verb after "as would..."," You don't need one. In general, it is perfectly acceptable to assume that the preceding verb is implied. So, if you had a sentence such as, "Having encountered a venomous snake, he turned and ran, just as any reasonable person would run,", you can say instead, "Having encountered a ...


4

1)  I can't find the verb after "as would". "Would" is verb enough.  What that verb means is dependent on the modificand of the prepositional phrase that "as" creates: staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into [stare at her] - or - staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would [stare at ...


20

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into. There's nothing missing from the basic construction. Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" ...


12

The seal was staring [in the same way] as a calm dog would [stare] when she had just walked into its yard. You are expected to 'understand' the missing words, which have been left out to make the sentence shorter.


0

The sentence should say: Can you tell me how I can use this tool? In forming questions, you should place only the first "can" before the subject. All other modal verbs like can should follow the declarative sentence structure. The first "can" placed before you already makes the sentence an interrogative one.


2

From a strictly grammatical viewpoint, both read and write and write and read are grammatical, and essentially equivalent in meaning. There is nothing inherently incorrect in referring to children learning to write and read. Grammar is far from the only consideration in communication, however. In binomial pairs (i.e. groups of words of the same part of ...


0

The way I see it, the reason that sentence is in the SECOND Conditional is because THE OPPOSITE context happened, making the situation specified in your sentence IMPOSSIBLE to happen anymore. So, if you say: "If David didn't give up smoking..." <- the fact you mentioned the conditional clause in the simple past means that this is something ...


Top 50 recent answers are included